Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCrime Victims
IN THE NEWS

Crime Victims

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2012
Now in its 23rd year, Maryland's annual statewide memorial service for crime victims and their families, an official day of remembrance organized by prosecutors and the state Board of Victims Services, comes with a long roll call of the murdered or missing. The names now cover fully 28 pages in the program organizers hand out at the door to each of four services held across the state, and the music video that lists each name runs for most of an hour. Sunday, in Hagerstown in western Maryland, in Denton on the Eastern Shore, in Waldorf in southern Maryland and in the auditorium of Long Reach High School in Howard County, the families of victims gathered to remember their dead and to be among others who share the pain of losing a loved one to violent crime.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 20, 2014
City Police Commissioner Anthony Batts set an example for his fellow officers when he met recently with Baltimore's transgender community to discuss the murder of a 26-year-old transgender woman whose body was found in a Northwest Baltimore alley last week. The death of Mia Henderson on Wednesday, and the slaying last month of Kandy Hall, another transgender woman, sent shock waves through the LGBT community that have left many members fearful of being targeted by violence, yet reluctant to turn to police for help.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Bonnita Spikes | April 12, 2011
This is National Crime Victims' Rights Week -- a time for the nation and our state to ask about the meaning of justice, both present and future, for those harmed by crime. Our theme this year, "Reshaping the Future, Honoring the Past," calls on us to not only reflect, but also to act. Our first duty is to never forget the impact of crime. I am a crime victim. My husband, Michael, was murdered in a convenience store robbery in 1994. I was left to raise our four boys on my own. I'm happy to report that they have all become wonderful, productive adult men despite what they lost that day. But, even now, the anniversary of that day can bring us to our knees.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Lawyer Marilyn J. Mosby entered the Baltimore state's attorney race as a decided underdog. Just 34 years old, she was seeking to unseat a well-connected incumbent who would outraise her by a 3-to-1 margin. She'd never prosecuted a rape or murder case. Some of Baltimore's high-powered lawyers met her campaign with eye rolls. But Mosby's message - consistently expressing outrage over Baltimore's crime rate - resonated with voters. In Tuesday's Democratic primary, she easily defeated State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein, 58, by 10 percentage points.
NEWS
July 20, 2014
City Police Commissioner Anthony Batts set an example for his fellow officers when he met recently with Baltimore's transgender community to discuss the murder of a 26-year-old transgender woman whose body was found in a Northwest Baltimore alley last week. The death of Mia Henderson on Wednesday, and the slaying last month of Kandy Hall, another transgender woman, sent shock waves through the LGBT community that have left many members fearful of being targeted by violence, yet reluctant to turn to police for help.
NEWS
December 21, 2011
Dan Rodricks ' commentary on the towing industry highlights an obvious problem that allows towing companies to make a lot of money at the expense of vehicle owners ("Towing the line on property rights," Dec. 18). But the problem is even larger than Mr. Rodricks suggests. Victims of auto theft or crimes that result in the towing of their vehicle must pay all the associated fees required to retrieve their car after it is recovered by police. As Mr. Rodricks explained, this amount can quickly add up. This is an excellent example of secondary victimization that occurs when crime victims receive unfair and insensitive treatment in the aftermath of a crime.
NEWS
April 28, 2012
The criminal defense lawyers make the fair and typical plea for the "right to privacy" on behalf of the violent suspects they represent, but they ignore that the victim of a crime, be it an individual, a store or whatever, has not only lost their privacy but considerably more in the process ("Maryland police continue to collect DNA samples," April 26). There are consequences to bad behavior and if giving up your DNA is one of them, so be it. Peter Bell, Monkton
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
A group of victim advocates are holding a "tweetchat" to draw attention to what they said was a broken promise from Gov. Martin O'Malley to give money to families of homicide victims. The chat can be followed on Twitter using the hash tag #victimsmatter In the bill that would repeal Maryland's death penalty, O'Malley included $500,000 for next year's budget to help families of murder victims and other violent crimes. O'Malley pressed repeal on the grounds it was expense and ineffective, arguing taxpayer dollars should be better spent.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
Michael Rindos was driving along Bay Dale Drive in Annapolis last summer when he saw a shocking scene: A nearly naked young woman driving behind him was being struck by a man in the car, and she was screaming for help. Rindos, now 19 and a freshman at the University of Maryland, College Park, said he didn't think about the potential dangers that June afternoon. He just sprang into action. "He probably didn't think he was going to be a hero," said Anne Arundel County Assistant State's Attorney Anastasia Prigge.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
Advocates for crime victims and those who provide services for them, including police, huddled Monday in Annapolis as they worked with state officials on ways to better help the thousands of people harmed by crime in Maryland each year. The sessions were the latest step toward the Governor's Office of Crime Control & Prevention's plan to issue a report and recommendations this fall for improving assistance to crime victims. "This is the first-ever blueprint from victims," said Kristen Mahoney, executive director of the office that funnels federal and state grant money to law enforcement, nonprofit agencies and others.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
He's come out on top in six contested elections as a Democrat in an increasingly conservative county, and has withstood criticism that he's both too soft and too tough, appeased minorities and disappointed minorities, said too little and said too much. He's been on the job a quarter-century, long enough to get his typewriter replaced by a computer with a flat-screen monitor, see defendants' locations pinpointed by cellphone towers and have DNA emerge as a key tool in criminal cases.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
A group of victim advocates are holding a "tweetchat" to draw attention to what they said was a broken promise from Gov. Martin O'Malley to give money to families of homicide victims. The chat can be followed on Twitter using the hash tag #victimsmatter In the bill that would repeal Maryland's death penalty, O'Malley included $500,000 for next year's budget to help families of murder victims and other violent crimes. O'Malley pressed repeal on the grounds it was expense and ineffective, arguing taxpayer dollars should be better spent.
NEWS
April 28, 2012
The criminal defense lawyers make the fair and typical plea for the "right to privacy" on behalf of the violent suspects they represent, but they ignore that the victim of a crime, be it an individual, a store or whatever, has not only lost their privacy but considerably more in the process ("Maryland police continue to collect DNA samples," April 26). There are consequences to bad behavior and if giving up your DNA is one of them, so be it. Peter Bell, Monkton
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for highs in the upper 40s and cold, windy and wet conditions. Tonight, winds are expected to remain up to 20 miles per hour and there is a 50 percent chance of rain or snow showers. TRAFFIC Check our traffic map for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM THE WEEKEND... Residents evacuated after 3-alarm fire ignites Canton warehouse : The Baltimore City Fire Department battled a three-alarm fire at a warehouse at 1200 Baylis St. in the Canton area late into the night Sunday, bringing it under control around midnight.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2012
Now in its 23rd year, Maryland's annual statewide memorial service for crime victims and their families, an official day of remembrance organized by prosecutors and the state Board of Victims Services, comes with a long roll call of the murdered or missing. The names now cover fully 28 pages in the program organizers hand out at the door to each of four services held across the state, and the music video that lists each name runs for most of an hour. Sunday, in Hagerstown in western Maryland, in Denton on the Eastern Shore, in Waldorf in southern Maryland and in the auditorium of Long Reach High School in Howard County, the families of victims gathered to remember their dead and to be among others who share the pain of losing a loved one to violent crime.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 19, 2012
The Harford County State's Attorney's office is participating in National Crime Victims' Rights Week April 22-28 and will feature a program about presenting crime this Monday. This annual observance seeks to increase public awareness and knowledge among crime victims and survivors about the wide range of rights and services available to people who have been victimized by crime, according to State's Attorney Joseph Cassilly. The theme for the 2012 National Crime Victims' Rights Week is "Extending the Vision, Reaching Every Victim.
NEWS
May 18, 2000
The Howard County Police Department will no longer charge crime victims for police reports, and it has reduced the fee it charges lawyers and insurance companies for the documents. Effective immediately, the department has eliminated the $7.50 fee for people classified on incident reports as victims or owners of property that has been stolen or damaged. Insurance companies and lawyers will be charged $2.50 for the reports.
NEWS
April 9, 2008
To commemorate National Victims' Rights Week (April 13-19), a public memorial ceremony in remembrance of Howard County crime victims will be held at 7 p.m. on April 16 at the county government's office complex in Ellicott City. The ceremony will be held in the Banneker Room at the George Howard Building, 3430 Courthouse Drive, followed by a candlelight vigil at the Omar J. Jones, Jr. Plaza adjoining the Carroll Building and the George Howard buildings. Light refreshments will be served.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
John Josselyn stood at a gun range in Baltimore County on the warmest day of last week, ready for target practice with his .22-caliber pistol, and recalled how the simple threat of a gun once saved him from three thugs. The gun-rights advocate called it "tantamount to the rattle of a rattlesnake. " But Matthew Fenton's memories of firearms give him no sense of security. He was shot in the head three decades ago during a robbery that led him to found an anti-gun lobbying group. There's still a half-dollar sized piece of skull missing today above his left eye, where the bullet struck him that night.
NEWS
December 21, 2011
Dan Rodricks ' commentary on the towing industry highlights an obvious problem that allows towing companies to make a lot of money at the expense of vehicle owners ("Towing the line on property rights," Dec. 18). But the problem is even larger than Mr. Rodricks suggests. Victims of auto theft or crimes that result in the towing of their vehicle must pay all the associated fees required to retrieve their car after it is recovered by police. As Mr. Rodricks explained, this amount can quickly add up. This is an excellent example of secondary victimization that occurs when crime victims receive unfair and insensitive treatment in the aftermath of a crime.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.