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By Matt Vensel | May 24, 2011
The controversial comments made over the weekend by Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis about how a canceled season would cause a spike in crime have overshadowed Tuesday’s informal player workouts at Towson University. His claim continues to be a talker out in the blogosphere and among terrestrial media outlets. “Do this research if we don't have a season -- watch how much evil, which we call crime, watch how much crime picks up, if you take away our game," Lewis said in an interview withESPN’s Sal Paolantonio . ESPN’s John Clayton agrees that football is a vital part of society, but he thinks all that crime talk is a bit of an exaggeration . Sports Illustrated’s Peter King isn’t “ buying what Lewis is selling .” Pete Prisco ofCBS Sports also criticized the legendary linebacker, and he wants to know if there is data to back up the claim . Well, Baltimore Sun crime reporter Justin Fenton has compiled crime data from football Sundays via Baltimore public records.
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By Jonah Goldberg | March 10, 2014
President Obama announced last week a new race-based initiative, My Brother's Keeper. According to the White House, the program will coordinate government agencies and private foundations to help young men and boys of color. "Of color" basically means blacks and Latinos. In fact, it's pretty obvious the program is aimed at young black men. This fact has invited some conservative criticism. The Weekly Standard's Terry Eastland notes that the program is likely unconstitutional.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
A total of 7,164 people were the victim of a reported hate crime across the country in 2012, with 19.2 percent of them targeted because of their sexual orientation, according to new data released by the FBI on Monday . The numbers show a decline compared to 2011, when 7,713 victims were reported targeted, 20.4 percent because of their sexual orientation. In 2012, 1,376 victims were targeted for their sexual orientation. Of the offenses, 53.9 percent were based on "anti-male homosexual" bias, 28.6 percent on a general "anti-homosexual" bias, 12.7 percent on an "anti-female homosexual" bias, 3 percent on an "anti-bisexual" bias, and 1.9 percent on an "anti-heterosexual" bias.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
A total of 7,164 people were the victim of a reported hate crime across the country in 2012, with 19.2 percent of them targeted because of their sexual orientation, according to new data released by the FBI on Monday . The numbers show a decline compared to 2011, when 7,713 victims were reported targeted, 20.4 percent because of their sexual orientation. In 2012, 1,376 victims were targeted for their sexual orientation. Of the offenses, 53.9 percent were based on "anti-male homosexual" bias, 28.6 percent on a general "anti-homosexual" bias, 12.7 percent on an "anti-female homosexual" bias, 3 percent on an "anti-bisexual" bias, and 1.9 percent on an "anti-heterosexual" bias.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2002
The Baltimore County Police Department is 6 1/2 months behind in compiling official countywide crime statistics, a time lag department officials blame on Year 2000 computer modifications. The delay has caused concern among members of the County Council, which in its 2002-2003 budget message urged the department to speed the process. The statistics - which measure crimes such as homicide, rape, robbery and vehicle theft - are voluntarily given to the Federal Bureau of Investigation to allow the bureau to track national crime trends.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | March 3, 2006
Legislators are pursuing whistleblower protections for police who refuse orders from their superiors to underreport crime, the latest fallout from the politically tinged debate over Baltimore police practices. Sen. Nancy Jacobs, a Harford County Republican, and Del. Jill P. Carter, a Baltimore Democrat, said they want to make it a crime for local police departments to knowingly report false crime statistics. They also want to shield street-level officers from reprisals if they refuse to report false crime statistics.
NEWS
By DOUG DONOVAN and DOUG DONOVAN,SUN REPORTER | February 15, 2006
Mayor Martin O'Malley said yesterday that the city's violent crime statistics are accurate and that an independent audit of the data, similar to one he authorized six years ago, is not warranted, despite calls for such a review by his Democratic opponent for governor. Critics question whether O'Malley's assertion that Baltimore's violent crime declined nearly 40 percent during his tenure has been inflated because it compares 1999 data, which underwent a comprehensive audit that increased the reported incidents of violence, to 2004 statistics, which were not subjected to the same scrutiny.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
The crime rate dropped 10 percent in Harford County last year, according to statistics compiled by the Maryland State Police.Figures show that the total number of crimes committed in the county fell to 6,078 from 6,722.Only St. Mary's, Washington and Worcester counties reported a larger percentage of decline in crime for 1992. All had an 11 percent decrease last year.Cecil County's crime rate also fell 10 percent.The figures in the 1992 Preliminary Uniform Crime Report are provided by law enforcement agencies statewide and are listed along with 1991 totals.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2003
Baltimore police are investigating the possibility that they under-reported rapes in the city last year, according to sources familiar with an internal review ordered by Commissioner Kevin P. Clark. The review preliminarily found that the city might have under-reported the crime by as much as 32 percent, or by about 85 rapes, the sources said. Baltimore police reported to the FBI that there were 178 rapes in the city last year. Clark said in an interview that the review was only half complete, and he believed that the final number would probably not be much higher than what police reported to the FBI, which records and publishes national crime statistics.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | February 11, 2006
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is funding a study to determine whether Baltimore City and four Maryland counties are correctly reporting crime statistics, raising major objections from some police departments that see it as a flawed - and potentially politically motivated - exercise. The grant is being administered by the Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention, the same agency that Ehrlich said during the 2002 campaign was highly politicized under the leadership of his opponent, then-Lt.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
Baltimore Police have been able to present some impressive - sometimes maybe even hard to believe for some - crime statistics in the past decade, but a figure put forward last night was beyond head-scratching. In preparation of a walk through downtown to the Inner Harbor with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, police sent a reporter a data sheet showing that crime was down substantially in the downtown neighborhood and Seton Hill.  Down so much, the data showed, that it had declined 525 percent.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
When the University of Maryland issues its end-of-year crime report to the U.S. Department of Education - as is required by federal law - it will not include the recent off-campus shooting that left two students dead and another wounded. Though the violence occurred less than a quarter-mile from campus, the university is not required to report it under the 1990 Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistic Act . "The rules for Clery reporting are very exact, and this incident will not fall into the geographic area for which we report," Crystal Brown, a university spokeswoman, said in an email.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
Most major crime was down in Baltimore County during the first half of 2012 compared with the average rate of crime during the same time frame in the past five years, according to Baltimore County police. Rapes, the exception to the overall 8.6 percent decline, increased. The first six months of the year showed homicides, robberies and aggravated assaults, all considered "Part I violent crime," had declined compared with the previous five-year average, Police Chief James Johnson wrote in a summary of the statistics posted on the county website Tuesday.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | November 15, 2012
Baltimore city school police are working to reconcile insufficient documentation of roughly 300 police reports to meet an annual deadline for the Baltimore City Police Department to submit its annual crime stats to the federal government, school and law enforcement officials confirmed Thursday. In a memo, city police informed school police leaders that more than 300 reports were considered "delinquent," because paperwork had not been filed, or not filed properly. Sources told The Baltimore Sun that roughly half of the reports pertained to Part I offenses, which are considered the most dangerous and are often felonies.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun reporter | September 4, 2012
WEATHER The National Weather Service is calling for Tuesday to be rainy, with a high near 86 and southeast winds 5 to 9 miles per hour. There is an 60 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. New rainfall amounts between one tenth and one quarter of an inch are possible. Tuesday night is expected to be cloudy and rainy, with a low around 75 and south winds 8 miles per hour. There is a 60 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2012
Campus crime statistics reported to the federal government show there were 15 burglaries at Morgan State University in 2010. But a review of the university's daily crime log found twice as many. When reporting campus crime to the U.S. Department of Education, Morgan State downgraded many burglaries to thefts, following a federal directive that crimes not be reported as burglaries without evidence of unauthorized entry. And thefts — there were more than 100 reported at Morgan State in 2010 — are not included in the federal data on campus crime.
NEWS
By DOUG DONOVAN AND JULIE BYKOWICZ and DOUG DONOVAN AND JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTERS | February 24, 2006
Even as Mayor Martin O'Malley's top administration officials dismiss critics' doubts about Baltimore crime statistics as politically fueled attacks, they stepped up a campaign yesterday to restore public confidence in their reporting techniques. In a hastily assembled morning news conference, the city's health commissioner and fire chief presented data showing that a downward trend of gunshot-related emergency room visits and ambulance calls appear to correlate with a five-year decline in shootings recorded by police.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
Most major crime was down in Baltimore County during the first half of 2012 compared with the average rate of crime during the same time frame in the past five years, according to Baltimore County police. Rapes, the exception to the overall 8.6 percent decline, increased. The first six months of the year showed homicides, robberies and aggravated assaults, all considered "Part I violent crime," had declined compared with the previous five-year average, Police Chief James Johnson wrote in a summary of the statistics posted on the county website Tuesday.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | May 24, 2011
The controversial comments made over the weekend by Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis about how a canceled season would cause a spike in crime have overshadowed Tuesday’s informal player workouts at Towson University. His claim continues to be a talker out in the blogosphere and among terrestrial media outlets. “Do this research if we don't have a season -- watch how much evil, which we call crime, watch how much crime picks up, if you take away our game," Lewis said in an interview withESPN’s Sal Paolantonio . ESPN’s John Clayton agrees that football is a vital part of society, but he thinks all that crime talk is a bit of an exaggeration . Sports Illustrated’s Peter King isn’t “ buying what Lewis is selling .” Pete Prisco ofCBS Sports also criticized the legendary linebacker, and he wants to know if there is data to back up the claim . Well, Baltimore Sun crime reporter Justin Fenton has compiled crime data from football Sundays via Baltimore public records.
NEWS
May 11, 2010
Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has been saying recently that this year he isn't going to let Gov. Martin O'Malley redefine reality. Apparently that's a task he prefers to handle himself. How else to explain the former governor's contention that a report of significant reductions in statewide violent crime in 2009 does not count as "progress?" That a dip to crime levels not seen since the 1970s isn't worthy of some celebration? Certainly, the former governor is right to point out that Maryland remains far too violent.
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