Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCrime Scene Investigation
IN THE NEWS

Crime Scene Investigation

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Tim Swift and Tim Swift,SUN REPORTER | March 10, 2008
After an onslaught of forgettable game shows, strangely themed newsmagazines and just plain-old reruns, scripted programming will rebound from its strike-induced coma next week as CBS' Monday comedy lineup returns to full strength. Top-rated sitcom Two and a Half Men along with How I Met Your Mother and The Big Bang Theory will lead the way as the first shows to return with new episodes since the three-month-long Hollywood writers' strike was resolved early last month. More sitcoms will return in early April, followed by heavyweight dramas like Grey's Anatomy and CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
A man hangs from a rope connected to the beam of a barn, his feet smashing through a wooden crate so he looks like he's cut off at the knees. His wife explains that when he was angered or annoyed, he would go to that spot, get up on a bucket, put a noose around his neck and threaten suicide. On the fatal day, she placed the bucket elsewhere, so he grabbed the crate. Is this a picture of accidental death, as she contends? Or is it suicide — or murder? This scene doesn't belong to a forensic TV series like "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
A man hangs from a rope connected to the beam of a barn, his feet smashing through a wooden crate so he looks like he's cut off at the knees. His wife explains that when he was angered or annoyed, he would go to that spot, get up on a bucket, put a noose around his neck and threaten suicide. On the fatal day, she placed the bucket elsewhere, so he grabbed the crate. Is this a picture of accidental death, as she contends? Or is it suicide — or murder? This scene doesn't belong to a forensic TV series like "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
FEATURES
By Tim Swift and Tim Swift,SUN REPORTER | March 10, 2008
After an onslaught of forgettable game shows, strangely themed newsmagazines and just plain-old reruns, scripted programming will rebound from its strike-induced coma next week as CBS' Monday comedy lineup returns to full strength. Top-rated sitcom Two and a Half Men along with How I Met Your Mother and The Big Bang Theory will lead the way as the first shows to return with new episodes since the three-month-long Hollywood writers' strike was resolved early last month. More sitcoms will return in early April, followed by heavyweight dramas like Grey's Anatomy and CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
NEWS
By Nick Shields and Nick Shields,sun reporter | February 27, 2007
Dana Kollmann writes about the hot summer day she went to a squalid rowhouse to collect evidence of a drug overdose. She describes how she photographed a man dead in the bathroom, a syringe still in his arm. In another room of the rowhouse, she recalls, the dead man's brother sat at the kitchen table -- and gnawed at a drumstick and played along with a TV game show. It was Wheel of Fortune and, according to Kollmann, the brother called out an answer: "Fun in the sun." "You just don't see this stuff on CSI," said Kollmann, a former real-life crime scene investigator for the Baltimore County police and author of a new book that chronicles her adventures.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2005
Three years ago, science teacher Terri Bradford had to rely on textbooks and the traditional gear of lab biology and chemistry to grab the interest of her River Hill High School students. Today, Bradford is known for her mock crime scene layouts - complete with fake corpses and bloody footprints in the classroom - as she teaches the applied science of forensics. Bradford, who is part of a growing group of forensic science teachers in high schools across the country, uses real-life stories, equipment and guest speakers from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, as well as professional pathologists, to impart crime-solving lessons.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2003
Christine Grace, 16, traces her interest in blood splatters, tire tracks and ballistics to the night when she saw these detectives solving the most heinous murder by the thread of a single hair. She was watching the television show CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. "I was just, like, how could they solve crimes from a hair?" Christine said. Last fall, she enrolled in a new forensic science class at Dulaney High School in Timonium, and ever since, she has wanted to be a forensic scientist, collecting evidence at crime scenes.
FEATURES
September 26, 2007
Top TV shows for the week of Sept. 17-23, according to A.C. Nielsen Co.: ShowNetworkViewers* 1Football: Dallas at ChicagoNBC19.0 2Survivor: ChinaCBS15.3 3CSI: Crime Scene InvestigationCBS14.0 4Sunday Night NFL Pre-KickNBC13.8 5Cold CaseCBS12.7 6Deal or No Deal, MondayNBC11.7 7SharkCBS11.4 860 MinutesCBS11.3 9Without a TraceCBS11.2 10Two and a Half MenCBS10.8 The listing gives estimated numbers of viewers (in millions) for each show last week.
NEWS
By Nick Shields and Nick Shields,sun reporter | February 27, 2007
Dana Kollmann writes about the hot summer day she went to a squalid rowhouse to collect evidence of a drug overdose. She describes how she photographed a man dead in the bathroom, a syringe still in his arm. In another room of the rowhouse, she recalls, the dead man's brother sat at the kitchen table -- and gnawed at a drumstick and played along with a TV game show. It was Wheel of Fortune and, according to Kollmann, the brother called out an answer: "Fun in the sun." "You just don't see this stuff on CSI," said Kollmann, a former real-life crime scene investigator for the Baltimore County police and author of a new book that chronicles her adventures.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2005
Three years ago, science teacher Terri Bradford had to rely on textbooks and the traditional gear of lab biology and chemistry to grab the interest of her River Hill High School students. Today, Bradford is known for her mock crime scene layouts - complete with fake corpses and bloody footprints in the classroom - as she teaches the applied science of forensics. Bradford, who is part of a growing group of forensic science teachers in high schools across the country, uses real-life stories, equipment and guest speakers from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, as well as professional pathologists, to impart crime-solving lessons.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2003
Christine Grace, 16, traces her interest in blood splatters, tire tracks and ballistics to the night when she saw these detectives solving the most heinous murder by the thread of a single hair. She was watching the television show CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. "I was just, like, how could they solve crimes from a hair?" Christine said. Last fall, she enrolled in a new forensic science class at Dulaney High School in Timonium, and ever since, she has wanted to be a forensic scientist, collecting evidence at crime scenes.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.