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By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2003
The central witness in a high-profile federal racketeering case concluded his testimony yesterday as jurors continued hearing evidence against a group of area men accused of using Baltimore nightclubs to disguise a violent crime ring. Louis W. Colvin, a convicted heroin dealer who authorities say became one of the group's two leaders when he left federal prison in the late 1990s, gave jurors a firsthand account of criminal acts that included drug dealing, arson, insurance fraud and attempted murder.
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BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | May 31, 2007
ATLANTA -- Organized retail theft is on the rise, according to an industry survey. More than three-quarters of retailers said their stores had been hit by crime rings in the past year, the National Retail Federation said yesterday. The federation surveyed 99 senior loss-prevention executives across all sectors of the retail industry. The trade group also found that 71 percent of retail respondents saw a boost in organized theft, up significantly from a similar survey in 2006, when 48 percent of retailers experienced an uptick.
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2002
For more than a decade, Louis W. Colvin and James E. Gross Sr. have been linked by crime. They were arrested together in 1990, each carrying a loaded handgun as they climbed into a new, white Lincoln Continental where police found dozens of tiny bags of heroin stuffed into a Pepperidge Farm cookie bag. They were convicted together on drug and gun charges. They served nearly identical prison terms. And when they got out, allege court records filed by U.S. prosecutors in the spring, Gross and Colvin soon were reunited, running a violent Baltimore crime ring that reached well beyond routine drug dealing into arson, insurance fraud, witness intimidation and attempted murder.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 24, 2003
In Baltimore County Recycling plant damaged in fire; no injuries reported CATONSVILLE - Large portions of a paper recycling plant on the Patapsco River collapsed last night during a raging four-alarm fire. More than 100 firefighters from Baltimore and Howard counties and Baltimore City siphoned water from the river to battle the blaze, which was reported about 9 p.m., at the Simkins Industries plant, said Lt. Vernon Adamson, a Baltimore County Fire Department spokesman. No one was reported injured in the fire, which was still burning early today.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2003
Before he became the government's star witness in a high-profile racketeering case, Louis W. Colvin for two years juggled the competing roles of high-rolling nightclub operator, crime-ring leader and Drug Enforcement Administration informant, testimony and records show. From mid-2000 until last spring, Colvin was known publicly for operating a pair of area nightclubs, including a stylish club in downtown Baltimore where he said he had personal bodyguards and a partnership with former heavyweight boxing champion Hasim S. Rahman.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2003
A federal jury in Baltimore found a group of area men guilty yesterday of using nightclubs and other businesses as fronts for a violent crime ring, marking the first time in recent history that U.S. prosecutors have dismantled a city drug gang under the same racketeering laws that helped bring down Mafia figures elsewhere. The trial, which stretched over seven weeks and featured testimony about the ringleaders' ties to former state Sen. Michael B. Mitchell Sr. and boxer Hasim S. Rahman, could become an important test case for prosecutors as they weigh whether to bring similar organized crime charges to fight Baltimore's loosely structured drug trade.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2002
In the latest example of federal authorities moving to prosecute Baltimore's worst crimes, seven area men have been charged under rarely used racketeering laws with running a crime ring that reached well beyond routine drug-dealing into arson, witness tampering and attempted murder, U.S. Attorney Thomas M. DiBiagio said yesterday. A federal indictment made public yesterday said the group was responsible for arsons that destroyed two nightclubs - one as part of an insurance fraud scheme at the group's former operations base, Strawberry's 5000 in Baltimore County; the other allegedly to thwart competition at the now-defunct Club Fahrenheit in Southeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2003
Two convicted heroin dealers who authorities say used Baltimore nightclubs to hide a violent crime ring repeatedly relied on the advice and connections of former state Sen. Michael B. Mitchell to keep their legitimate business fronts running smoothly, an events promoter who worked closely with the men testified yesterday. In one instance, the leaders of the alleged crime ring received a more favorable hearing date before the city liquor board after one of the men handed Mitchell some cash before the former Baltimore councilman met privately with liquor board officials, promoter Martin "Chicken" Young testified in U.S. District Court.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 24, 2003
In Baltimore County Recycling plant damaged in fire; no injuries reported CATONSVILLE - Large portions of a paper recycling plant on the Patapsco River collapsed last night during a raging four-alarm fire. More than 100 firefighters from Baltimore and Howard counties and Baltimore City siphoned water from the river to battle the blaze, which was reported about 9 p.m., at the Simkins Industries plant, said Lt. Vernon Adamson, a Baltimore County Fire Department spokesman. No one was reported injured in the fire, which was still burning early today.
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 14, 2003
BELGRADE, Serbia-Montenegro - A day after Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic was gunned down, the government announced yesterday that it had arrested or detained 58 people in connection with the assassination, including two men believed to have been involved in some of the worst atrocities of the Balkan civil wars. Acting Prime Minister Nebojsa Covic said a successor to Djindjic would be nominated Sunday. After a day of intensive manhunts under a government-declared state of emergency, police said 56 people had been detained on suspicion of conspiring in Wednesday's sharpshooter ambush on Djindjic, who was shot as he walked into his office building.
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 14, 2003
BELGRADE, Serbia-Montenegro - A day after Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic was gunned down, the government announced yesterday that it had arrested or detained 58 people in connection with the assassination, including two men believed to have been involved in some of the worst atrocities of the Balkan civil wars. Acting Prime Minister Nebojsa Covic said a successor to Djindjic would be nominated Sunday. After a day of intensive manhunts under a government-declared state of emergency, police said 56 people had been detained on suspicion of conspiring in Wednesday's sharpshooter ambush on Djindjic, who was shot as he walked into his office building.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2003
The predawn fire that destroyed the Rosedale nightclub Strawberry's 5000 on a cold January morning two years ago appeared at first to be little more than a bad ending to a business troubled by rowdy crowds, parking lot fights and sagging profits. As they sifted through the bar's charred remains, however, investigators began uncovering the outline of what they later would describe as a violent and highly organized crime ring with a series of legitimate business fronts, connections to prominent Baltimore figures and ties to the city's drug trade reaching back more than a decade.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2003
A federal jury in Baltimore found a group of area men guilty yesterday of using nightclubs and other businesses as fronts for a violent crime ring, marking the first time in recent history that U.S. prosecutors have dismantled a city drug gang under the same racketeering laws that helped bring down Mafia figures elsewhere. The trial, which stretched over seven weeks and featured testimony about the ringleaders' ties to former state Sen. Michael B. Mitchell Sr. and boxer Hasim S. Rahman, could become an important test case for prosecutors as they weigh whether to bring similar organized crime charges to fight Baltimore's loosely structured drug trade.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2003
The central witness in a high-profile federal racketeering case concluded his testimony yesterday as jurors continued hearing evidence against a group of area men accused of using Baltimore nightclubs to disguise a violent crime ring. Louis W. Colvin, a convicted heroin dealer who authorities say became one of the group's two leaders when he left federal prison in the late 1990s, gave jurors a firsthand account of criminal acts that included drug dealing, arson, insurance fraud and attempted murder.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2003
Before he became the government's star witness in a high-profile racketeering case, Louis W. Colvin for two years juggled the competing roles of high-rolling nightclub operator, crime-ring leader and Drug Enforcement Administration informant, testimony and records show. From mid-2000 until last spring, Colvin was known publicly for operating a pair of area nightclubs, including a stylish club in downtown Baltimore where he said he had personal bodyguards and a partnership with former heavyweight boxing champion Hasim S. Rahman.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2003
Two convicted heroin dealers who authorities say used Baltimore nightclubs to hide a violent crime ring repeatedly relied on the advice and connections of former state Sen. Michael B. Mitchell to keep their legitimate business fronts running smoothly, an events promoter who worked closely with the men testified yesterday. In one instance, the leaders of the alleged crime ring received a more favorable hearing date before the city liquor board after one of the men handed Mitchell some cash before the former Baltimore councilman met privately with liquor board officials, promoter Martin "Chicken" Young testified in U.S. District Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Joan Jacobson and Story by Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2001
Just after dawn on the day Charlie Wilhelm decided to come clean, he heard car doors slam outside his Hampden rowhouse and knew this time his nightmare was real. As he bolted from bed and pulled on a pair of pants, detectives burst through the unlocked front door. P In the living room, Charlie restrained his barking Rottweiler while upstairs, his wife rousted their frightened children from their beds. Police, drawn guns at their sides, told Charlie they had a search warrant: They were looking for evidence of bookmaking.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2002
For more than a decade, Louis W. Colvin and James E. Gross Sr. have been linked by crime. They were arrested together in 1990, each carrying a loaded handgun as they climbed into a new, white Lincoln Continental where police found dozens of tiny bags of heroin stuffed into a Pepperidge Farm cookie bag. They were convicted together on drug and gun charges. They served nearly identical prison terms. And when they got out, court records filed by U.S. prosecutors last spring alleged that Gross and Colvin soon were reunited, running a violent Baltimore crime ring that reached well beyond routine drug dealing into arson, insurance fraud, witness intimidation and attempted murder.
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