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Yvonne Wenger | April 20, 2012
What happens when cities tear down public housing? The issue has played out in Baltimore and major cities across the country (remember the controversy surrounding HOPE VI, or Opportunities for People Everywhere? More here on that). A new study out this month by the Urban Institute and Emory University reveals the latest on the subject. It's an attempt to answer with "empirical evidence" whether a common perception is true: that teardowns contribute to crime waves in the neighborhoods where the former public-housing families settle.
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NEWS
August 29, 2014
Almost exactly two years ago this week Anthony Batts arrived in Baltimore to take over the leadership of the city's police department. Since then Baltimore has seen homicides go up, then come down again as Mr. Batts has instituted reforms, shaken up the force and reached out to local residents in an effort to build trust between his officers and the citizens they serve. It wasn't always obvious that the department was making progress on his watch, but it's a measure of his success in all those endeavors that today he enjoys the confidence of public officials who just a year ago were openly questioning whether he was up to the job. That remarkable turnaround in attitudes was reflected in the ringing endorsements Mr. Batts received this week from City Council members who appear set to unanimously approve his nomination for a new six-year contract as the city's top cop. Over the past two years Mr. Batts clearly has proven himself as a leader who can get things done, and he has vindicated the high hopes Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake held out for him when she recruited him from the West Coast where he had spent most of his 30-year career in law enforcement.
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NEWS
November 25, 2011
Regarding Leonard Pitts' column about crime in a public housing project, I offer my own reasons why state government needs to focus on improving education and job training in devastated urban areas like Liberty Square ("What if this was your neighborhood?" Nov. 20). As a student of sociology at Elon University, I have studied the impact of education on incarceration rates. Sixty-seven percent of prisoners have not earned a high school diploma. Since education has been shown to significantly reduce the probability of incarceration, even slight improvements in educational achievement would produce a drop in crime and incarceration rates.
NEWS
May 13, 2014
City Councilman Brandon Scott had the right idea this week when he said the bill he is sponsoring to toughen up the city's curfew law to require children under 14 to be indoors year-round by 9 p.m. is not about arresting kids or cutting crime rates. It's about keeping the city's young people safe, and that can't happen if they are allowed to wander the streets late at night. It's really the parents' responsibility to make sure their children are where they're supposed to be at all times, especially after dark.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 1997
The percentage of Americans victimized by crime fell last year to the lowest level since the government began keeping data on the issue in 1973, according to a Justice Department report issued yesterday.The report found that the nation's rate of violent crime dropped 10 percent in 1996, while the rate of property crime declined 8 percent."I'm flabbergasted," said Jeffrey Fagan, director of the Center for Violence Research and Prevention at Columbia University."That's a very dramatic drop."
NEWS
August 3, 2012
Although some of my neighbors and local political representatives think I'm a nuisance and new to our great state of Maryland, this is simply not the case. I was born and raised in Middle River, attended theU.S. Naval Academyand have worn a uniform in service to our nation, moving many times through the years. My family and I decided to come back home and be an active, positive participant in our community. Early on, I've noticed a few things. We are told that times are tough and that our municipalities are cutting back due to decreased revenue, crime is continuing to rise, and it is becoming harder to fund public education.
NEWS
January 6, 2012
Peter Hermann 's story on Baltimore murders accurately described the challenges the city faces even as violence there has dropped ("Baltimore murder victims, suspects share ties to criminal justice system," Jan. 2). However, the progress has also allowed Gov. Martin O'Malley to declare that his Violence Prevention Initiative was responsible for the decline - an overreaching claim that flies in the face of data. Baltimore's murder rate has been decreasing for more than a decade, closely tracking a national trend, and it began dropping long before the governor's initiative was launched.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | November 3, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The pace of crime in Maryland is slowing as more and more criminals are imprisoned, but the state is far from a safe place to live, according to a conservative group that released a Report Card on Crime yesterday.Maryland was ranked fourth-highest in terms of violent crime rates, behind Florida, New York and California, and had the eighth-highest crime rate, said the American Legislative Exchange Council.The solution, say leaders of the bipartisan group of state legislators, is to put criminals -- especially repeat violent offenders -- in jail longer by establishing minimum sentencing guidelines and ensuring prisoners serve at least 85 percent of their sentences.
NEWS
By Robert Reno | August 31, 1999
A STEEPLY falling crime rate has been one of the defining events of the decade, something that would cause most civilized nations to wallow in self-satisfaction.But perversely, it occurred in a period when the incidental mass homicide became a recurring national event. These shootings have spawned a new TV-news genre, the nonfiction soap opera, during which politicians, social scientists and media pundits all swoon and chant "What did we do wrong?"Gun owners go on the screaming defensive, and some "expert" invariably suggests that teen-agers or racists likely to become maniacs can be expertly and effectively screened from those who merely act like them.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2003
The total number of reported crimes in Howard County dropped during the first three months of this year, but the number of arrests also fell, according to a first-quarter crime report. Violent crimes decreased from 117 to 114, or 2.56 percent, in the first three months, and total property crimes decreased from 1,739 to 1,538, or almost 12 percent, during the same period, said the report released Friday from county police. Total arrests declined by more than 30 percent. Severe winter weather may have had a significant impact on the decreases, said Sherry Llewellyn, a police spokeswoman.
NEWS
December 27, 2013
Recent news has really made me want to speak out about our government and how it prioritizes things. Finally, Congress has passed something of a budget, but how can they think that it will help the economy if they don't extend the unemployment benefits for so many people? There are so many homeless, hungry, sick and poor people in our country. What really disturbed me was when the president stated that he would like to see a gay or lesbian winner in the Olympics this year. How can he even say something like that when there are so many other needs in our country?
NEWS
September 22, 2013
Perhaps Gov. Martin O'Malley doesn't remember what the homicide rate was back in the day when he was Baltimore's mayor, or maybe he's just trying to burnish his crime-fighting credentials ahead of his anticipated 2016 presidential bid. Either way, his recent comments criticizing the rising murder rate and declining number of arrests in the city - and his implicit swipe against Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony Batts -...
NEWS
July 10, 2013
The major shake-up of the city police department command structure this week by Commissioner Anthony Batts brings to an end a months-long process during which the city's top cop has been working assiduously to put his own team in place. The transfers and promotions announced today reflect Mr. Batts' best judgment of his department's strengths and weaknesses as well as the effectiveness of the leaders he has appointed to key posts. Having put his personal stamp on the organization, he now owns it, and from this point forward he can expect to be held fully accountable for its success or failure.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | January 15, 2013
Why rob banks? Depression era bank robber Willie Sutton's supposed answer to this question is legendary because of its irrefutable logic: "Because that's where the money is. " The late Mr. Sutton's simple quip about criminality is remembered and repeated by succeeding generations when situation at hand calls for a reality check. Such is the case when the question increasing police presence in Harford County Public Schools is raised. Why put more police in the schools? Because that's where the at-risk population is for eight or more hours a day for about 180 days each year.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
After five years of progress in reducing or holding virtually stable the number of homicides committed in Baltimore City, 2012 saw a disturbing rise in killings over the previous year. City officials need to ask themselves whether this is merely a statistical blip in an otherwise generally positive trend, or whether it indicates more serious problems ahead. As of today, 215 people have been killed in the city, a 10 percent increase over this time last year. In 2011, the first year since the 1970s with fewer than 200 homicides, officials pointed to the drop as a major victory against crime and a sign that Baltimore was finally on a path to shed its image as one of America's most dangerous cities.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
Crime in Maryland fell to its lowest level since the federal government began compiling such statistics in 1975, Gov. Martin O'Malley's office announced Wednesday. The state reported that total crime dropped 4.8 percent in 2011, and homicides decreased 6.6 percent to 398 - the lowest total since 1985 and the lowest ever reported by Maryland on a per-capita basis. Property crime rates also hit record low levels last year, including the categories of breaking and entering, larceny and auto theft.
NEWS
By Tim Weiner and Tim Weiner,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The United States is "the most violent and self-destructive nation on earth," the Senate Judiciary Committee said in a report released yesterday.The report depicted Americans killing, raping and robbing each other at a furious rate, surpassing every other country that keeps crime statistics.The nation's citizens committed a record number of killings in 1990 -- at least 23,200, or nearly three an hour -- and a record number of rapes, robberies and assaults, the committee said.
NEWS
By Richard Moran | February 28, 1995
IN THE RAUCOUS debate over the Republicans' anti-crime package, which the Senate is to take up next month, the hiring of more police officers has become the major point of contention. The outcome of this battle will no doubt be significant for congressional politics, but it will do little to reduce crime in America.As hard as it may be to believe, there is no direct relationship between the number of police officers and the rate of crime in a community.In 1991, San Diego and Dallas had about the same ratio of police officers to the population, yet twice as many crimes were reported in Dallas.
NEWS
August 28, 2012
Whoever Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake had chosen to replace retired Baltimore City Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III would have had a tough act to follow. But in Anthony Batts, who comes to Baltimore after a 30-year career in California that included stints as police chief in Long Beach and Oakland, the mayor may have found a leader whose skills and experience match Baltimore's needs. If Mr. Batts can build on the solid accomplishments of his able predecessor, he will find a warm welcome in this city.
NEWS
August 3, 2012
Although some of my neighbors and local political representatives think I'm a nuisance and new to our great state of Maryland, this is simply not the case. I was born and raised in Middle River, attended theU.S. Naval Academyand have worn a uniform in service to our nation, moving many times through the years. My family and I decided to come back home and be an active, positive participant in our community. Early on, I've noticed a few things. We are told that times are tough and that our municipalities are cutting back due to decreased revenue, crime is continuing to rise, and it is becoming harder to fund public education.
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