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Letter to The Aegis | March 14, 2013
Editor: Every day the media reports more crime, more violent crime, all kinds of pointless crimes. I can think of at least three excellent deterrents to crime – any crime: • The moral/religious compass, based on the Judeo-Christian principles found in America's foundation that was once taught by parents, teachers and clerics.  • The fear of punishment after arrest, trial and conviction – particularly execution.    ...
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NEWS
September 30, 2013
The vitriolic discourse between Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Gov. Martin O'Malley should be directed to the judges and courts ("Don't return to a failed crime-fighting strategy," Sept. 22). The number of arrests don't matter if the courts fail to give meaningful sentences. Most of the recidivists, when caught, have long records and should not even be on the streets. It makes no sense to give a sentence for a violent crime, suspend most of it and then release the defendant on time served (because they could not post bond)
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NEWS
September 30, 2013
The vitriolic discourse between Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Gov. Martin O'Malley should be directed to the judges and courts ("Don't return to a failed crime-fighting strategy," Sept. 22). The number of arrests don't matter if the courts fail to give meaningful sentences. Most of the recidivists, when caught, have long records and should not even be on the streets. It makes no sense to give a sentence for a violent crime, suspend most of it and then release the defendant on time served (because they could not post bond)
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | March 14, 2013
Editor: Every day the media reports more crime, more violent crime, all kinds of pointless crimes. I can think of at least three excellent deterrents to crime – any crime: • The moral/religious compass, based on the Judeo-Christian principles found in America's foundation that was once taught by parents, teachers and clerics.  • The fear of punishment after arrest, trial and conviction – particularly execution.    ...
NEWS
September 16, 2010
No matter who wins the final vote count in the states' attorney contest, we will all be talking about crime over the next several weeks. Police and prosecutors fight crime, but education prevents crime. We're seeing signs of an educational renaissance in Baltimore City, but it's just the beginning. As a teacher, a city resident and a Democratic nominee to the Maryland Senate, I won't be satisfied until our schools are so great that families want to move into the city so their children can attend Baltimore City Public Schools.
NEWS
May 24, 2009
When Baltimore police roll into city neighborhoods known for serious drug violence, the first thing they often hear are shouts of "Five-O! Five-O!" from lookouts warning of their approach. The lookouts, mostly men in their 40s and 50s who are considered too old to play much of a role in the street-level drug trade, earn a meager subsistence on the periphery of the business. Younger, up-and-coming dealers pay them a pittance to keep watch, usually in the form of just enough heroin or crack cocaine to get them through another day. So when Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III, who came up through the ranks and once walked those mean streets himself, considers how to manage Baltimore's endemic crime problem, he's got to be thinking of those middle-age guys on the street who, broke, unemployed and addicted, are as much victims of the city's violent drug trade as are the junkies who line up in the shadows to buy their daily fix. "The best thing I could possibly do to reduce crime in Baltimore would be to give all my officers two kinds of cards to hand out," the commissioner says.
NEWS
June 22, 2012
In the discussion of the downtown crime problem by Del. Pat McDonough and The Sun's Dan Rodricks , there is an important missing link ("Sailabration brings out the mobs," June 19). When the link is considered, one can see that they are both right! They are discussing two different areas. Delegate McDonough is talking about downtown Baltimore and Mr. Rodricks is talking about the Inner Harbor. As someone who has lived in the central business district for the past six years, there is only one reason that I'm there - namely, the harbor.
NEWS
October 26, 2011
Since Sept. 13, the date of Baltimore City's mayoral primary, there has been little to no coverage of the race leading up to the general election Nov. 8. The winners of that race will have it in their power to fix the 1 in 4 jobless rate in Baltimore City, stimulate a stagnant city economy, fix the appalling vacant property problem, balance the budget without raising taxes, fix an outdated transportation system, seriously address the crime problem...
NEWS
January 28, 2013
I do not believe in any form of gun control, and I think it will ultimately kill more law-abiding Americans than any other law. The vast majority of Americans believe in the Second Amendment and that infringing on one's right to defend oneself is a clear violation of the Constitution. I would be happy to offer ideas about how to reduce violent crimes committed with firearms. This is not rocket science, it's common sense. But gun control only equals more crime. It only helps the criminals among us commit more crimes.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | January 27, 1994
Boca Raton, Florida.--The issue of crime has provoked American politicians to spout demagoguery more befitting of the leaders of religious cults.FBI figures show that the rate of major crimes has not gone higher. But the flaming political rhetoric has, searing most Americans with a panicky fear of violence.Republican leaders cry that ''the Democrats are soft on crime,'' as they used to call them ''soft on communism.'' Now as then, leading Democrats are shaking in their boots, stooping to the disgraceful posture of trying to prove that they aren't coddlers of murderers, rapists, muggers and kidnappers.
NEWS
March 9, 2013
Regarding Doug McNeil's letter criticizing stricter regulation of firearms sales, is everyone as tired of reading about gun legislation and crime reduction as I am ("Gun licensing won't reduce crime," March 3)? Of course criminals will ignore the law. But it might well be better if fewer hotheads, fools and depressed personalities owned handguns and assault weapons. We all know what a hothead is. An acquaintance of mine once got angry at his car and shot out the windshield. Should he have had a pistol?
NEWS
January 28, 2013
I do not believe in any form of gun control, and I think it will ultimately kill more law-abiding Americans than any other law. The vast majority of Americans believe in the Second Amendment and that infringing on one's right to defend oneself is a clear violation of the Constitution. I would be happy to offer ideas about how to reduce violent crimes committed with firearms. This is not rocket science, it's common sense. But gun control only equals more crime. It only helps the criminals among us commit more crimes.
NEWS
June 22, 2012
In the discussion of the downtown crime problem by Del. Pat McDonough and The Sun's Dan Rodricks , there is an important missing link ("Sailabration brings out the mobs," June 19). When the link is considered, one can see that they are both right! They are discussing two different areas. Delegate McDonough is talking about downtown Baltimore and Mr. Rodricks is talking about the Inner Harbor. As someone who has lived in the central business district for the past six years, there is only one reason that I'm there - namely, the harbor.
NEWS
October 26, 2011
Since Sept. 13, the date of Baltimore City's mayoral primary, there has been little to no coverage of the race leading up to the general election Nov. 8. The winners of that race will have it in their power to fix the 1 in 4 jobless rate in Baltimore City, stimulate a stagnant city economy, fix the appalling vacant property problem, balance the budget without raising taxes, fix an outdated transportation system, seriously address the crime problem...
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2011
Baltimore County police have charged a 25-year-old man in a Saturday stabbing that injured four people at a Parkville bar — an incident that concerns officers who say the club has had violent crime problems in the past. Allen Quentin Johnson, of the 1500 block of Lester Morton Court in Baltimore City, faces 18 charges including first-degree assault after police said he stabbed four men outside the Cheers Bar & Grill at 1969 E. Joppa Road. The stabbing was one of several incidents in recent years that have brought police to Cheers Bar, located behind the Perring Plaza shopping center in Parkville, which overlooks Interstate 695. A number of police reports cite the bar as the backdrop for assaults, disorderly crowds, and one attempted-murder charge in October 2008, but the police calls have died down in the past year.
NEWS
September 16, 2010
No matter who wins the final vote count in the states' attorney contest, we will all be talking about crime over the next several weeks. Police and prosecutors fight crime, but education prevents crime. We're seeing signs of an educational renaissance in Baltimore City, but it's just the beginning. As a teacher, a city resident and a Democratic nominee to the Maryland Senate, I won't be satisfied until our schools are so great that families want to move into the city so their children can attend Baltimore City Public Schools.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | March 19, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer called today for new strategies for law enforcement in the community as he opened the Governor's Summit on Violent Crime at the Baltimore Convention Center.The governor's opening remarks came as approximately 700 law enforcement officials and business and community leaders gathered to address the mounting crime problem in the city and throughout Maryland.Mr. Schaefer said the crime problem cannot be solved simply by "throwing money at it." Rather, he said, issues such as the disintegration of the family and education and welfare reform must be addressed.
NEWS
March 9, 2013
Regarding Doug McNeil's letter criticizing stricter regulation of firearms sales, is everyone as tired of reading about gun legislation and crime reduction as I am ("Gun licensing won't reduce crime," March 3)? Of course criminals will ignore the law. But it might well be better if fewer hotheads, fools and depressed personalities owned handguns and assault weapons. We all know what a hothead is. An acquaintance of mine once got angry at his car and shot out the windshield. Should he have had a pistol?
NEWS
By Sherrilyn Ifill | September 13, 2010
There have been few things more dispiriting in Baltimore's public life than the last weeks of the race for state's attorney between incumbent Pat Jessamy and challenger Gregg Bernstein. Ms. Jessamy has held the position since 1995, surviving early battles with former Mayor Martin O'Malley and outlasting a series of controversial police chiefs. This time around many influential Baltimoreans decided to support Mr. Bernstein, a well-respected and skilled criminal defense attorney with no public or elective office experience but with a well-financed campaign and strong engagement with many voters.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2010
The mayor confronted a citizen at a community meeting. "Is there any crime in your neighborhood?" the chief executive asked. "Oh yea, it's terrible," the man replied. Said the mayor: "Well, what specifically? Has anything happened to you or to your wife? A neighbor?" Said the man: "No. But the morning paper is full of it. " The man wasn't identified in the editorial published in The Baltimore Sun that recounted this conversation. The mayor was William Donald Schaefer.
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