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Crime Prevention Programs

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NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1998
Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. honored 13 programs in Carroll County yesterday for their effectiveness in helping at-risk youngsters and battling juvenile crime.During a visit to Westminster, Curran also named two other Carroll programs as finalists in his "Spotlight on Prevention," a statewide tour to recognize crime prevention programs.Seven Carroll County public school programs were recognized. Some aim at helping parents become their children's first teachers or helping high school dropouts earn equivalency diplomas.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2011
Ella Bailey and her two grandsons hurried down a strip mall sidewalk on a recent sultry summer morning, sipping bottles of pineapple soda. The three passed by a dark swirl on the sidewalk, a bloody reminder that a delivery man was fatally shot at this Northeast Baltimore shopping center less than a month ago. A gouge in the parking lot marks the spot where a bullet ricocheted, shopping center employees say. "All day, all you hear is ambulances and...
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NEWS
December 9, 2007
State transportation officials have scheduled a public hearing Thursday on plans for improving 16 miles of Interstate 95, mostly in Harford County. The meeting is set for 5 p.m. at William Paca Elementary, 2706 Philadelphia Road, Abingdon. Visitors can review displays and question state officials from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Officials will give an overview of the project and take public testimony, which will be recorded, until 8:30 p.m. Residents may also submit written comments for the public record until Jan. 21. More details on the project are available at www.mdtranspor tationauthority.
NEWS
December 9, 2007
State transportation officials have scheduled a public hearing Thursday on plans for improving 16 miles of Interstate 95, mostly in Harford County. The meeting is set for 5 p.m. at William Paca Elementary, 2706 Philadelphia Road, Abingdon. Visitors can review displays and question state officials from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Officials will give an overview of the project and take public testimony, which will be recorded, until 8:30 p.m. Residents may also submit written comments for the public record until Jan. 21. More details on the project are available at www.mdtranspor tationauthority.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1996
A Baltimore County detective who developed crime prevention programs and a state trooper cited for drunken-driving enforcement and valor during a shooting at a shopping mall were named winners yesterday in the 39th annual Baltimore Sun Police Officer of the Year awards ceremony.An independent panel of judges selected the winners from 78 nominees from 12 law enforcement and correction agencies across Maryland. Nominees were selected for exceptional effort in law enforcement and community service.
NEWS
By Edward L. Heard Jr. and Edward L. Heard Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | August 6, 1991
From 8 to 10 tonight, in an act of unity, many city residents will turn on their lights and sit on their front stoops chatting with their neighbors in a symbolic stand against crime.The eighth annual National Night Out will be celebrated with marches, parades, candlelight vigils, block parties and other demonstrations in Baltimore and across the country.The nationwide event was organized around the crime-fighting concepts of the Pennsylvania-based National Association of Town Watch, which promotes crime prevention and circulates a national newsletter.
NEWS
February 8, 1993
When crime levels blip upward, governments often respond by hiring more police officers. It's the kind of step that can curtail crime. Perhaps more significantly, it soothes the public fear that the streets, parking lots and malls are no longer safe.Hiring cops is an option in a strong economy. However, when money's tight, as it is now, what's a government to do? In Baltimore County, where the perception of crime seems to have dwarfed the reality of it, County Executive Roger Hayden is turning to various low-cost and even no-cost methods to curtail criminal activity in his subdivision.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Baltimore County policeSun Staff Writer | August 2, 1994
Violent crime in Baltimore County dropped by 8.1 percent during the first half of 1994, a decline that officials attributed to a cold winter and crime prevention programs.Overall crime increased by 1.2 percent over the same period of 1993, largely the result of a 27.4 percent in auto theft.County Executive Roger B. Hayden, facing a tough re-election battle, showed up yesterday with police officials at the White Marsh police precinct to announce the good news and to unveil the first shipment of 100 new police cruisers being added to the county's fleet -- the first new cars since 1990.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1999
In an effort to keep crime down and the community involved, Howard County police are inviting Long Reach village residents to a forum tonight to discuss safety and crime concerns.The gathering is a continuation of meetings held last year with residents of the Heatherstone townhouse community and the Sierra Woods apartment complex. But this year, police want people from other Long Reach communities to attend and get involved."People in the neighborhoods see a lot of stuff," said Pfc. Lisa Myers, one of the meeting's organizers who works in the HotSpot community.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff | September 23, 1995
Baltimore's leading business group promised yesterday to push hard for expanded government-funded drug treatment and juvenile crime prevention programs, and to urge its members to step up their efforts to make workplaces drug free.The Greater Baltimore Committee (GBC) also pledged its "full and complete support" to building a juvenile justice center in Baltimore and to creating a court to deal swiftly with minor crimes."Let me assure you that the GBC is not idly talking about this subject matter," said William L. Jews, chairman of the organization, which represents more than 700 of the largest businesses in the Baltimore metropolitan area.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1999
In an effort to keep crime down and the community involved, Howard County police are inviting Long Reach village residents to a forum tonight to discuss safety and crime concerns.The gathering is a continuation of meetings held last year with residents of the Heatherstone townhouse community and the Sierra Woods apartment complex. But this year, police want people from other Long Reach communities to attend and get involved."People in the neighborhoods see a lot of stuff," said Pfc. Lisa Myers, one of the meeting's organizers who works in the HotSpot community.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1998
Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. honored 13 programs in Carroll County yesterday for their effectiveness in helping at-risk youngsters and battling juvenile crime.During a visit to Westminster, Curran also named two other Carroll programs as finalists in his "Spotlight on Prevention," a statewide tour to recognize crime prevention programs.Seven Carroll County public school programs were recognized. Some aim at helping parents become their children's first teachers or helping high school dropouts earn equivalency diplomas.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1996
A Baltimore County detective who developed crime prevention programs and a state trooper cited for drunken-driving enforcement and valor during a shooting at a shopping mall were named winners yesterday in the 39th annual Baltimore Sun Police Officer of the Year awards ceremony.An independent panel of judges selected the winners from 78 nominees from 12 law enforcement and correction agencies across Maryland. Nominees were selected for exceptional effort in law enforcement and community service.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,SUN STAFF | February 29, 1996
Led by a rise in robbery and burglary, the number of serious crimes in Howard County increased 4.9 percent last year -- though arrests in such cases dropped about 6 percent, according to 1995 statistics released by county police yesterday.It was the third year in a row that the growing county has experienced a rise in what police categorize as serious crime -- a category consisting of homicide, rape, assault, burglary, robbery, theft and car theft.And two of last year's most serious crimes -- the shooting of two employees at a Scan furniture store in Columbia's Owen Brown village last June and an armored car robbery outside a shopping center in Hickory Ridge village in August -- remain unsolved.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff | September 23, 1995
Baltimore's leading business group promised yesterday to push hard for expanded government-funded drug treatment and juvenile crime prevention programs, and to urge its members to step up their efforts to make workplaces drug free.The Greater Baltimore Committee (GBC) also pledged its "full and complete support" to building a juvenile justice center in Baltimore and to creating a court to deal swiftly with minor crimes."Let me assure you that the GBC is not idly talking about this subject matter," said William L. Jews, chairman of the organization, which represents more than 700 of the largest businesses in the Baltimore metropolitan area.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | September 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The ceremony marking President Clinton's signing of the crime bill was a true political extravaganza, but it also was a throwback that probably has little meaning for skeptical voters these days. As a media event, it was a classic -- worthy of Buckingham Palace or at least the days when Mike Deaver arranged such televised spectacles as backdrops for President Ronald Reagan.There were 2,000-plus guests on the White House lawn, including a phalanx of uniformed police and representatives of community organizations and groups of crime victims.
NEWS
July 30, 1994
President Clinton calls it "the toughest, largest, smartest federal attack on crime in the history of our country." Political hyperbole aside, Democrats in Congress with a modicum of Republican support seem poised to pass a massive $30.2 billion measure that attempts to come to grips with the crime crisis from many angles: More cops on the beat, bans on specified assault weapons, extension of the federal death penalty, financial support for prison construction...
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,SUN STAFF | February 29, 1996
Led by a rise in robbery and burglary, the number of serious crimes in Howard County increased 4.9 percent last year -- though arrests in such cases dropped about 6 percent, according to 1995 statistics released by county police yesterday.It was the third year in a row that the growing county has experienced a rise in what police categorize as serious crime -- a category consisting of homicide, rape, assault, burglary, robbery, theft and car theft.And two of last year's most serious crimes -- the shooting of two employees at a Scan furniture store in Columbia's Owen Brown village last June and an armored car robbery outside a shopping center in Hickory Ridge village in August -- remain unsolved.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Baltimore County policeSun Staff Writer | August 2, 1994
Violent crime in Baltimore County dropped by 8.1 percent during the first half of 1994, a decline that officials attributed to a cold winter and crime prevention programs.Overall crime increased by 1.2 percent over the same period of 1993, largely the result of a 27.4 percent in auto theft.County Executive Roger B. Hayden, facing a tough re-election battle, showed up yesterday with police officials at the White Marsh police precinct to announce the good news and to unveil the first shipment of 100 new police cruisers being added to the county's fleet -- the first new cars since 1990.
NEWS
July 30, 1994
President Clinton calls it "the toughest, largest, smartest federal attack on crime in the history of our country." Political hyperbole aside, Democrats in Congress with a modicum of Republican support seem poised to pass a massive $30.2 billion measure that attempts to come to grips with the crime crisis from many angles: More cops on the beat, bans on specified assault weapons, extension of the federal death penalty, financial support for prison construction...
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