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Crime Is Down

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NEWS
By Linda Chavez | May 12, 2000
CRIME IS down for the eighth year in a row, so why don't Americans feel safer? Public opinion polls show that voters still rank crime as one of their most serious worries, and most Americans say they don't feel completely safe in their homes or when they go out at night. Despite figures released this week that show that serious crimes declined by 7 percent in 1999, most people believe crimeremains too high. And they're right. It's important to put crime in some perspective. Violent crime in the United States peaked in 1991, when some 758 violent crimes and more than 5,100 serious property crimes were committed per 100,000 population.
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NEWS
July 30, 2012
Instead of "People, not politicians killed gun control," Doyle McManus should have titled his July 27 op-ed "people and politicians reduce crime in America. " Not until the middle of his commentary does he admit that crime is down, and he attributes the lack of interest in gun control to this fact. But he does not say, or ignores the fact that, crime is down because of the increase in gun permits allowed by at least 35 states. As a newspaper columnist, he could have discovered this by reading John Lott's book, "More Guns, Less Crime.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 16, 1997
Now the Republican Congress can investigate the Democratic attorney general, and vice versa.According to Justice Department figures, crime is down everywhere but where you may be standing.E7Jackie Robinson integrated baseball, not Brooklyn.Well, it's getting to be nearly time to start thinking about doing the old income-tax return, isn't it?Pub Date: 4/16/97
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2012
Saying they are stretched too thin and face problems with a new dispatch and reporting system, Anne Arundel County police supervisor unions are blaming the administration for a situation they say is taking a toll on them and public safety. Two supervisors unions released a list of problems Friday that they say are putting the department on "the verge of crisis. " The sergeants and lieutenants groups previously voted no confidence in County Executive John R. Leopold and police Chief James Teare Sr. The unions contend the department's leadership — "especially" Leopold — has led to "a deterioration of public safety," and say that police fear a rise in crime, according to a prepared statement Friday.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | May 28, 1997
The way he acts at NATO, you would think Yeltsin had invented it.You can come out of the bomb shelter now. Violent crime is down 15 percent in Bawlmer County.The nerve of some school from New Jersey running away with it all at lax, again.Spielberg is the last dinosaur, flick-wise.Pub Date: 5/28/97
NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 30, 1998
Resolve not to argue about which comes first: the end of the new year, the millennium or the world.The people want the senators to hold a dignified trial, hearing all the evidence and rendering a judicious verdict, in three hours tops.N Cheer up. Crime is down, if not here, then everywhere else.The five worst NFL teams fired their coaches so they could hire each other's.Pub Date: 12/30/98
NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 12, 2001
Ashcroft won't say whom he locked up or why, and won't check whether they bought guns cause thats their right. On second thought, George won't try to end Social Security as we know it before the congressional elections, and probably won't after. Ehrlich is right. Politicians should raise the money first, then seek an office appropriate to the amount raised. Good news. Crime is down if you don't count murder.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 3, 1994
It's a story out of Disney: A handsome Arab prince rode up with $100 million to rescue the Euro Disney disaster.Why should Clocker's Fancy in St. Mary's County be a Maryland historic monument when it would fetch more money as a Washington weekend retreat?Hizzoner's housing, police and school chiefs are all shaking up their establishments. You'd almost think he was some kind of radical.Crime is down 11 percent in New York City. You could always move there.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 15, 1999
School crime is down but this is not time to claim victory and go home.After hearing out Sinn Fein and Unionist politicians as long as they want, George Mitchell deserves if not the Nobel prize, at least sainthood.They found a drug that's good for heart attacks whether before, after, during or instead of.In a town where Alex. Brown is German, Maryland Casualty is Swiss, Allfirst is Irish and Williams and Wilkins is Dutch, isolationism is not an option.The Republican Party of Maryland is a broad tent, but Bobby Neall found the flaps.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2003
Worried about a recent spike in killings, Baltimore police are flooding the streets this week with extra officers on overtime shifts and deploying others to trouble spots, officials said. "They wanted to see if they could knock it down the first week of the month to set the tone for the rest of the month," said city police spokesman Matt Jablow of commanders' efforts to clamp down on crime. The commanders lengthened the hours of two shifts of patrol officers in each district from eight-hour to 12-hour tours, with the extra four hours funded by overtime, Jablow said.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | June 14, 2009
In the days before computers, the police had File 13, for "forget it." The year was 1964, and Baltimore police discovered that half of the city's criminal complaints had not been properly reported. The police chief was forced to retire, the department established an internal affairs unit and lawmakers removed a restriction that only city residents could lead the agency. Altering, fudging, manipulating and sometimes even ignoring crime has been a part of police work here and around the country since cops started counting and politicians started using the numbers to climb into office or to sabotage opponents.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | June 6, 2009
Executives of a venture capital company that has been a mainstay in Baltimore's Mid-Town neighborhood for a quarter-century told the mayor they are moving to the suburbs because their employees no longer feel safe in the city, an economic blow that demonstrates the far-reaching impact crime can have on a neighborhood. The announcement from Louis Citron, the general counsel of New Enterprise Associates on St. Paul Street, which has offices in Chevy Chase, California, China and India, came in the form of an e-mail Thursday night to Mayor Sheila Dixon and three members of the City Council.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | May 29, 2009
Crime is down 9 percent this year, city police tell us. The mayor says we're seeing "extraordinary results" and attributes the drop to her plan to target violent criminals. Meanwhile, people are being attacked in and around downtown, from Mount Vernon to Federal Hill, and five people have been killed this week, including a man shot near the baseball stadium shortly after the bars and clubs had closed. Cops say they're beefing up patrols at the Inner Harbor and neighboring communities, and people say they're scared.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | May 26, 2009
With the unofficial beginning of summer here, crime in Baltimore so far this year is down in nearly every category, mirroring a national trend as most large cities defy predictions that crime will rise in a struggling economy. Total crime is down 9 percent, including an 11 percent drop in violent crime. Property crime, which rose last year for the first time in 15 years, is down 9 percent so far this year. And homicides, which for much of the year were up by a considerable margin, have largely stabilized in recent weeks.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | April 20, 2009
Last year, Baltimore police decided to pursue a potentially wince-inducing task: asking victims of crime if they thought the department was doing a good job. The results may surprise some: A majority of crime victims - 63 percent - were satisfied with the police response to their emergency calls. But most were frustrated with the follow-up, and nearly half said they plan to move out of their neighborhood in the near future, according to results of a survey conducted by the Baltimore Police Department.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Justin Fenton and Annie Linskey and Justin Fenton,annie.linskey@baltsun.com and justin.fenton@baltsun.com | February 10, 2009
Baltimore City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake introduced resolutions yesterday asking the city's police commissioner to brief the council on the effect of reduced police overtime on Baltimore's homicide rate, a plan to redraw police district lines and the effectiveness of the city's blue-light crime cameras. At a City Council lunch, Rawlings-Blake said current police district lines are outdated and could be responsible for a "structural deficit" in police overtime spending.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | May 29, 2009
Crime is down 9 percent this year, city police tell us. The mayor says we're seeing "extraordinary results" and attributes the drop to her plan to target violent criminals. Meanwhile, people are being attacked in and around downtown, from Mount Vernon to Federal Hill, and five people have been killed this week, including a man shot near the baseball stadium shortly after the bars and clubs had closed. Cops say they're beefing up patrols at the Inner Harbor and neighboring communities, and people say they're scared.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Peter Hermann contributed to this article | March 19, 1997
As law enforcement officials from around the state met in Baltimore yesterday to discuss anti-crime efforts, Maryland State Police issued an annual report showing that crime -- especially violent crime -- dropped statewide in 1996.Murder, rape, robbery and serious assault declined 5 percent, and overall crime dropped 3 percent compared with 1995, according to the annual report.But while overall crime dropped 5.1 percent in the Baltimore metropolitan region and 1.2 percent in the Washington region, it rose on the Eastern Shore and in Western Maryland, including Carroll County.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | October 30, 2008
The members of the Eastern District police community relations council meet on the last Tuesday of every month, and they had developed a routine. Many people arrived early, sat down with an officer and quietly talked about drug dealing near their homes. It's not a good idea to air such complaints in public. But the members learned this week that they will no longer be able to have that sit-down with an officer. Complaints about established drug operations - crimes in progress still go to 911 - now need to be e-mailed directly to the major in charge of the district.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | October 17, 2008
With all my work to provide a different and smarter take on crime, readers want only one thing: "They just want to know how many break-ins are on my block." That insightful analysis comes from Robert E. Pierre, a crime reporter for The Washington Post. We appeared together this week on a radio show put together by the federal government's Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency. In English, that's parole and probation for D.C. criminals. Its spokesman, Leonard A. Sipes Jr., who used to speak for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, runs an impressive media operation that consists of TV, radio and blogs - designed to promote the agency but also to discuss criminal justice issues.
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