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Crime In Baltimore

NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
Arrests using DNA are being made at a faster clip thanks to expanded collection and processing in Maryland, state and city police said Thursday morning. At a joint news conference, State Police Superintendent Col. Terrence B. Sheridan and Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III announced that the state's DNA database had assisted in the arrests of 101 people for serious crimes committed in Baltimore over the past three years, including 68 for rapes or sex offenses and 13 for murder.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | May 29, 2009
Crime is down 9 percent this year, city police tell us. The mayor says we're seeing "extraordinary results" and attributes the drop to her plan to target violent criminals. Meanwhile, people are being attacked in and around downtown, from Mount Vernon to Federal Hill, and five people have been killed this week, including a man shot near the baseball stadium shortly after the bars and clubs had closed. Cops say they're beefing up patrols at the Inner Harbor and neighboring communities, and people say they're scared.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | May 26, 2009
With the unofficial beginning of summer here, crime in Baltimore so far this year is down in nearly every category, mirroring a national trend as most large cities defy predictions that crime will rise in a struggling economy. Total crime is down 9 percent, including an 11 percent drop in violent crime. Property crime, which rose last year for the first time in 15 years, is down 9 percent so far this year. And homicides, which for much of the year were up by a considerable margin, have largely stabilized in recent weeks.
NEWS
May 24, 2009
When Baltimore police roll into city neighborhoods known for serious drug violence, the first thing they often hear are shouts of "Five-O! Five-O!" from lookouts warning of their approach. The lookouts, mostly men in their 40s and 50s who are considered too old to play much of a role in the street-level drug trade, earn a meager subsistence on the periphery of the business. Younger, up-and-coming dealers pay them a pittance to keep watch, usually in the form of just enough heroin or crack cocaine to get them through another day. So when Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III, who came up through the ranks and once walked those mean streets himself, considers how to manage Baltimore's endemic crime problem, he's got to be thinking of those middle-age guys on the street who, broke, unemployed and addicted, are as much victims of the city's violent drug trade as are the junkies who line up in the shadows to buy their daily fix. "The best thing I could possibly do to reduce crime in Baltimore would be to give all my officers two kinds of cards to hand out," the commissioner says.
NEWS
By Doug Ward | August 12, 2008
There is a lot of talk today about one's carbon footprint and how we can all be "greener" in our approach to everyday living on the planet. But what impact do we have on crime - and how can we reduce it? Just imagine: It's Friday night in a McMansion in the suburbs of Baltimore. A rich white guy settles in for the evening with a couple of martinis, some weed and a couple of lines of coke. He's not hurting anyone, right? Wrong; he's contributing to the deaths of Baltimore's unfortunate black youths.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | April 20, 2008
In a city where leaders have for years tried and failed to curtail one of the nation's highest crime rates, a University of Maryland law professor has turned his classroom into a crime-fighting think tank. Professor Orde F. Kittrie is challenging his 13 students this semester to come up with workable ideas for making Baltimore and the rest of Maryland a safer place to live. The proposals, due in the form of term papers, are not destined for burial in a dusty file cabinet, the product of mere intellectual exercise.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | February 17, 2008
Long before a video of a Baltimore policeman berating a skateboarder in the Inner Harbor became a YouTube sensation, crime was one of the hottest Internet topics from the city. Most days, there are more blog posts from Baltimore about crime than about the Orioles, politics or practically any other subject, according to blog trackers like blogpulse and Ice Rocket. Call it the Wire-ization of Baltimore, but the topic continues to shape the identity and perception of the city. At least a half-dozen blogs focus on crime in and around the city.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 10, 2008
We asked painter Tony Shore, whose gritty new images of gang violence and street crime are on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery, whether he'd been watching too much TV lately - specifically, The Wire, HBO's police drama about gang violence and street crime in Baltimore. Not at all, Shore replied. Over the past few months he's been far too busy making his signature acrylic-on-black-velvet paintings to watch TV. Still, since winning the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts' $25,000 Sondheim Artscape Prize last summer, Shore has taken his painting in an unexpected direction.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | December 30, 2007
For the second year in a row, more Baltimore families have suffered through the murder of a loved one than in the previous year. The increase, though slight, underscores a troubling trend in homicides that leaves Baltimore standing virtually alone among major American cities. Since 1990, Baltimore's homicide rate, the number of killings per 100,000 residents, has stayed consistently high, while most other U.S. cities have seen their numbers drop in the years since crack cocaine-related crime was at its worst.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | December 2, 2007
Sean Taylor dies nearly every single day in Baltimore. Tragic. Senseless. Wasted promise and stolen potential. No, he's not usually a professional football player with an enviable bank account. But he is usually young, black and the victim of a crime. Last Monday, in his Palmetto Bay, Fla., home, his name was Sean Taylor. At the exact time Taylor was shot by an intruder, in Baltimore, his name was Michael Crowder, a 33-year-old man who was found unresponsive not far from his Coppin Heights home.
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