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NEWS
December 2, 1992
A Baltimore County politician describes the jurisdiction' crime problem as a 5,000-pound gorilla.People know it's out there. They know it has to be taken seriously. They fear it.They just aren't sure what to do about it.County residents are understandably concerned that area crime seems on the rise. Particularly when they learn about the more sensational recent crimes -- the double murders at the Randallstown bank and the Catonsville barber shop, the killing of a mall employee and the kidnapping of an off-duty police officer in Owings Mills -- many citizens must tell themselves, "I thought I lived out here to avoid this kind of stuff."
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2014
A recent spate of high-profile crimes in the area around Patterson Park has sparked new and warring commentary over the perennial issues of public safety and inequality in Baltimore. It started this week with a blog post titled " Baltimore City, You're Breaking My Heart " from Tracey Halvorsen, who lives in the area around Patterson Park. Her subheadline: "This is why people leave. " In the piece posted on Thursday, Halvorsen says there are many reasons to love her neighborhood, but that she's tired of hearing and worrying about crime and is unimpressed with the city's response.
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NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 30, 1999
Crime in Baltimore dropped more than 9 percent between January and March compared with the same period last year, a decrease city police and neighborhood leaders attribute mostly to community policing.Community leaders say e-mailings between residents and police through the Internet, neighborhood meetings and a cordial relationship between authorities and residents also played a part."For example, we have extremely effective safety programs in our community," said Doreen Rosenthal, president of the Mount Royal Improvement Association.
NEWS
April 17, 2013
It's unfortunate when an everyday accident happens but it's sad when columnist Dan Rodricks and Michael Hanchard use it to play the race card ("Man sees race, indifference in experience with Baltimore police," April 13). First, if as Michael Hanchard suggested "a middle-aged white couple had been surrounded by black or Latino attackers" no one would have known about it since The Sun wouldn't have printed whether the alleged attackers were black or Latino. They call that being PC. Secondly, if the couple were white they would have to be very careful where they drive or walk in the city, since they could be attacked simply because they are white.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,sun reporter | October 5, 2006
Responding to political advertisements by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. that have focused on crime in Baltimore, Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, former city health commissioner, said yesterday that the Ehrlich administration has hindered public safety efforts by failing to adequately fund drug treatment. Beilenson - who worked for Ehrlich's opponent, Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley, and who recently lost a Democratic bid for Congress - said that if Ehrlich is serious about reducing crime in Baltimore, he should make a more significant investment in fighting drug addiction through state grants.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1997
Continuing a downward trend that began nearly two years ago, crime in Baltimore declined substantially in the first nine months of 1997, compared with the same period last year, figures show.Violent crime dropped 9.3 percent, and property crime declined 12.6 percent, according to statistics released yesterday by the Baltimore Police Department.Together, they represented a cumulative drop in city crime of 11.8 percent.The numbers have been going down since last year, when crime decreased significantly for the first time in a decade.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF BTC Sun staff writers Robert Guy Matthews, Marilyn McCraven and Jamie Stiehm contributed to this article | April 17, 1997
Violent crime plummeted in Baltimore in the first three months of this year, picking up where 1996 left off when the number of assaults, shootings and robberies dropped significantly for the first time in a decade.Police officials are taking credit for the reductions -- nearly 20 percent for violent crime and 14 percent for property crime -- saying three years of incremental changes in the department are starting to pay off."I think that it validates our strategies that we put in place," said Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier, who was hired three years ago as shootings and homicides hit record levels.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 8, 2001
Seems like old times, having Britain back east of Suez. Hizzoner is busy protecting the nation's cities from terrorism. Crime in Baltimore will have to wait its turn. The Diamondback is a fellow's best friend. Whenever Annapolis folks worry how to balance the budget, they look at Coppin State College and save. Finally, folks can tell Barry Bonds from Bobby Bonds.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 16, 1994
What changed U.S. policy on Bosnia was French policy, and what changed that was French public opinion. When more Frenchmen got less comfortable with genocide, Bill thought better of bombing.Tonya may not beat Nancy or Oksana or Surya, but she whupped USOC.It can be fatal to witness a crime in Baltimore, which is why they have secret trials in Belfast.There's nothing like a good Baltimore-Toronto rivalry, whatever the sport.
NEWS
February 1, 1997
IT IS NO relief to his parents, but the murder of 3-year-old James Smith III has not been in vain. Since the child was shot at a barber shop, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has opened his eyes to some good ideas that could reduce violent crime in the city.Two weeks after the Jan. 2 shooting Mr. Schmoke announced he was for the first time moving money within the city budget to pay for more drug treatment slots. Much of the violent crime in Baltimore is linked to drug abuse. Last week, the mayor said he wants to follow Prince George's County's lead and get legislative approval for a bail bonds fee in Baltimore, with the money used for public safety.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2012
Campus crime statistics reported to the federal government show there were 15 burglaries at Morgan State University in 2010. But a review of the university's daily crime log found twice as many. When reporting campus crime to the U.S. Department of Education, Morgan State downgraded many burglaries to thefts, following a federal directive that crimes not be reported as burglaries without evidence of unauthorized entry. And thefts — there were more than 100 reported at Morgan State in 2010 — are not included in the federal data on campus crime.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2012
On Saturday night, Denise Kostka and her husband, disturbed by loud voices, peered out from their eighth-floor room in the Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel and saw at least 100 teens massing on the street below. "I never saw anything like that, ever," said Kostka, visiting from Springfield, N.J., to take in the sights and see her niece who lives in Federal Hill. Then they saw police surround a car. "I thought, 'Oh my God, it's "COPS" live,'" Kostka said, referring to the popular reality television show.
NEWS
July 5, 2011
The Independence Day festivities in the Inner Harbor were marred by two incidents of violence Monday night, the fatal stabbing of a 26-year-old man after an argument and the wounding of a 4-year-old boy by an apparent stray bullet. But before people start condemning Baltimore as unsafe and irredeemable, some caution — and perhaps context — is in order. That's not in any way to excuse these reprehensible actions. The stabbing victim — Joseph Calo, 26, of Opelika, Ala. — couldn't have merited his fate in the midst of what was supposed to be a joyful celebration of this nation’s founding.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2011
Armed robbers held up a doctor's office and a delivery driver was critically wounded in a shooting in a shopping center parking lot Tuesday — two brazen daytime attacks that continued a trend of rising crime in Northeast Baltimore. The robbery occurred in the 5400 block of Belair Road at about 10:30 a.m., police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi confirmed. A gunman wearing a tan-and-white outfit with a tan bandana over his face entered the doctor's office and took undisclosed amounts of cash and cellphones from patients and staff, Guglielmi said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
Despite a nearly across-the-board decline in crime, Baltimore maintained the fifth-highest homicide rate in the country last year, according to preliminary data released Monday by the FBI. Nationwide, crime dropped for the fourth straight year, continuing to defy predictions that crime would rise during a recession. Violent crime declined 5.5 percent last year compared with 2009, while property crimes dropped 2.8 percent. In Baltimore, violent crime declined 3.6 percent, and the city ranked seventh in violent crime per 100,000 residents.
NEWS
May 8, 2011
Residents of Northeast Baltimore, an area long regarded as a mostly placid, middle-class enclave of stable neighborhoods and small businesses, are understandably upset over a spike in crime that has left the district leading the city in homicides. As The Sun's Justin Fenton reported last week, shootings and other violent crimes in Northeast are up more than 20 percent at a time when homicides in Baltimore as a whole are at a two-decade low. The worst-hit communities have been Coldstream-Homestead-Montebello and Lauraville along the Harford Road corridor and the Belair-Edison neighborhood astride Belair Road.
NEWS
By Staff Report | March 3, 1993
While Baltimore County established a record for murders in 1992, the number of less serious crimes actually decreased by 4.8 percent, according to a report released yesterday.The annual crime statistics from county police and showed that violent crime continued to rise: there were more rapes, robberies and murders in 1992 than in 1991.Murder led the way. Forty-four people were killed in the county, compared to 25 the year before, an increase of 76 percent. The county has averaged around 30 murders per year over the last decade.
NEWS
June 21, 2004
ANNA MANTEGNA, newly hired prosecutor for Baltimore, isn't giving up her weekend job as a waitress at ESPN Zone. How could she? She has racked up about $90,000 in student loans, and starting pay for an assistant state's attorney is $10,000 less than a novice public defender earns. In fact, Ms. Mantegna, a law clerk to a judge, is taking a $2,052 pay cut to join the state's attorney's office. The pay disparity between city prosecutors and their counterparts in the public defender and attorney general's offices must be rectified.
NEWS
August 4, 2010
I have never commented on any article in your paper before, but this article ("Nothing new about fear-of-crime complaints," Aug. 4) upset me so much that I had to say something. In what way do these stats "counter" city residents' fears about crime? I cannot imagine how hard a policeman's job in Baltimore must be, but the scrutiny that the department receives for the continued state of crime in this city is in no way unfair. I live in Mount Vernon and generally feel very safe in my neighborhood.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | January 22, 2010
More arrests are being made using DNA, thanks to expanded collection and processing in Maryland, state and city police said Thursday morning. At a joint news conference, State Police Superintendent Col. Terrence B. Sheridan and Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III announced that the state's DNA database had assisted in the arrests of 101 people for serious crimes committed in Baltimore over the past three years, including 68...
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