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NEWS
March 24, 2014
After reading your article about Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts' visit to Chicago to observe its crime-fighting strategy, I could only ask: "Are you kidding me?" ( "Baltimore Police look to Chicago for crime-fighting insight," March 19). In many ways Chicago has more of a crime problem than we do, and it is no more effective at improving it. Baltimore's mayor and police commissioner should look at cities that have turned their crime problems around or have consistently low crime rates.
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NEWS
July 2, 2014
Victims advocates are expressing dismay over a decision this week by Maryland's highest court that could lead to the removal of hundreds of names from a list of registered sex offenders in the state. The advocates say removing names from the registry could put women and children at greater risk by leaving families less able to identify potential predators in their midst. But critics of the list argue there's no evidence it has resulted in fewer sexual assaults or deterred offenders from committing such crimes.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2003
An upscale Annapolis clothing store that celebrated its 50th anniversary last month and recently pledged financial support for local crime-fighting efforts was the target of a burglary early Sunday in which about $19,000 in clothing was taken. Police said about 50 pairs of pants, 68 sweaters, eight jackets and five leather bags were stolen from Johnson's On the Avenue, a store at the corner of Maryland Avenue and State Circle that caters to military men and high-end male shoppers. "It's a tribute to the community that [Johnson's]
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Baltimore's nearly $2.2 million proposal to reduce violent crime received preliminary approval from the City Council Monday, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said. The proposal would support Operation CeaseFire, a program aimed at reducing recidivism rates among violent offenders; and a youth center to hold minors who break curfew; and includes $1.2 million in city gambling revenue for overtime and staffing in high-crime areas. As the mayor stressed the need for the supplemental funding at a Monday evening news conference at City Hall, she said less than 1 percent of Western District residents committed more than 60 percent of the killings and more than 70 percent of the nonfatal shootings in that area.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2000
As Baltimore's homicide count continued to rise yesterday, Mayor Martin O'Malley blamed bickering with former police commissioner Ronald L. Daniel for holding up a new crime-fighting plan that could have prevented the recent spate of killings. The mayor remained undaunted by a homicide count that is rapidly spiraling beyond last year's pace, and he predicted this will be the first year in a decade that Baltimore records fewer than 300 killings. His remarks came after a night during which two men were killed and another critically wounded in three separate shootings.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1999
Howard County may get state funds this year for another anti-crime "HotSpot," a three-year initiative in which police and other law enforcement officials target a community and tailor a comprehensive prevention and enforcement strategy to it.The budget unveiled this month by Gov. Parris N. Glendening includes $3.5 million to double the number of HotSpots throughout the state from 36 to 72.Howard, which has a HotSpot in Columbia's Long Reach Village, would...
NEWS
April 5, 2000
WITH THE MIGHT of city voters' mandate, Mayor Martin O'Malley made clear yesterday that he won't tinker with a radical crime-fighting plan recommended by his consultants. This is the reality the City Council and others need to take into account as the process for naming the successor to Commissioner Ronald L. Daniel moves ahead. They may argue about the wisdom of the mayor's choice of Edward T. Norris, a former New York City deputy commissioner, to run the Baltimore Police Department. But the 152-page crime-fighting blueprint, in Mr. O'Malley's judgment, is non-negotiable.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Howard Libit and Del Quentin Wilber and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2001
A program at the heart of Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend's crime-fighting strategies has come under attack from city police officials who question its effectiveness and are cutting the number of officers assigned to the effort. Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris criticized the HotSpot Initiative, writing in a letter yesterday to state officials that "we cannot and will not return to the failed policies of the past, which, for political reasons, favored some neighborhoods over others."
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend marshaled a vivid show of political force in Northwest Baltimore yesterday, defending one of her suddenly embattled crime-fighting initiatives at a hastily arranged rally. Flanked by state and city politicians, religious leaders and hundreds of community supporters, Townsend climbed the steps of a closed public library in Park Heights and said she would not back away from the HotSpot program, which provides money for coordinated crime fighting, probation, anti-delinquency and drug-treatment efforts.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2002
In appointing a veteran commander as Baltimore's acting police commissioner, Mayor Martin O'Malley said yesterday that he wanted to provide stability for the department so that it could remain focused on crime fighting in coming months, and not become distracted by a search for a new leader. "The only thing I will be searching for is crime reduction through this year and the first quarter of next year," O'Malley said at a news conference to announce his selection of John McEntee as acting commissioner.
NEWS
March 24, 2014
After reading your article about Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts' visit to Chicago to observe its crime-fighting strategy, I could only ask: "Are you kidding me?" ( "Baltimore Police look to Chicago for crime-fighting insight," March 19). In many ways Chicago has more of a crime problem than we do, and it is no more effective at improving it. Baltimore's mayor and police commissioner should look at cities that have turned their crime problems around or have consistently low crime rates.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts and other top members of the agency have visited counterparts in Chicago to observe their crime-fighting strategy, the latest in a series of efforts to adopt law enforcement practices around the country. Chicago since 2012 has led the U.S. in total homicides, though its 413 murders in 2013 were a five-decade low and the city's per-capita murder rate is less than half that of Baltimore.  Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy hit back against skeptics in an interview with the Chicago Sun-Times published Wednesday , saying his crime-reduction plans are working.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 20, 2014
"O'Malley smiled and read his mail," David Kennedy, the widely respected criminologist, recalls of a December 1999 meeting with the new mayor of Baltimore. Martin O'Malley sat by while Jack Maple, his crime-fighting consultant from New York City, browbeat Kennedy, peppered him with questions, cut off his answers and either betrayed or feigned ignorance of Kennedy's violence-reducing strategy called Ceasefire. Kennedy recalls the exchange in his 2012 book, "Don't Shoot: One Man, a Street Fellowship, and the End of Violence in Inner-City America.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Heather R. Mizeur plans to propose what she calls a "transformational" approach to fighting crime on Wednesday, in which she would eliminate mandatory minimum sentences and use the governor's clemency and pardon powers to cut the prison population. Mizeur will introduce a detailed plan calling for a holistic approach to reducing crime, including social and educational programs as well as law enforcement strategies. "We cannot settle on 'tough on crime' after the fact - we need to stop crime before it occurs," she says in a 13-page plan.
NEWS
December 9, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was right last week to defend Baltimore's Safe Streets program as an effective tactic for reducing gun violence, despite the fact that one of the initiative's workers was arrested recently on federal drug and firearms charges. The fact that one bad apple turned up among the dozens of people employed in the effort doesn't invalidate the need for such programs or the valuable service they perform in troubled city neighborhoods. Safe Streets is a juvenile-violence reduction initiative in four city neighborhoods that employs street-wise community outreach workers to persuade adolescent boys and young men to choose nonviolent alternatives for settling disputes.
NEWS
By Justin George, Justin Fenton and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts wants to stop sending officers out on low-priority 911 calls, expand foot patrols and create a unit focused on investigating incidents in which police use force. He proposes assigning homicide detectives to city neighborhoods, beefing up investigative units and sending elite plainclothes officers to more police districts. He wants to install tiny cameras on officers' uniforms and put computer tablets in their hands. A year on the job, Batts on Thursday unveiled an overarching crime-fighting plan he said would bring "much-needed" and "long-sought-after reform" in a department he said has relied too heavily on outdated procedures and technology.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | November 16, 1992
Two Baltimore women who have led crime-fighting efforts at their public housing projects will gain national attention today on the syndicated television show "Inside Edition," which airs locally at 4:30 p.m. on WBAL (Channel 11).Barbara McKinney, 40, of the Lexington Terrace complex, and Anna Warren, 56, of Claremont homes, are scheduled to talk with "Inside Edition" producers this morning for the same-day telecast. Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is also scheduled to be interviewed.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | August 26, 1994
The question some adult viewers are going to have when they see Fox TV's "M.A.N.T.I.S" tonight is, "How did this show ever make it onto the network's fall schedule?"The answers are: 1) "M.A.N.T.I.S." is not primarily for adults. 2) For all its comic-book trappings, there's a deeper message here of empowerment that could be appealing to teens and pre-teens, especially African-Americans.The action-adventure series, which premieres at 8 tonight on WBFF (Channel 45), stars Carl Lumbly as Dr. Miles Hawkins, an African-American biophysicist who is paralyzed from the waist down when he's struck by a stray a bullet.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 28, 2013
Given what he said recently about solving Baltimore's crime problem, one imagines Martin O'Malley charging into the dressing room of a police district station, flipping the poker table upside down and yelling, "Get off your butts, you guys, and go arrest everybody!" Except, instead of "butts," he'd probably use that other word he used in 2001 when, as the cocky first-term mayor of Charm City, O'Malley famously trash-talked Pat Jessamy for not prosecuting a case our then-state's attorney considered a loser.
NEWS
September 22, 2013
Perhaps Gov. Martin O'Malley doesn't remember what the homicide rate was back in the day when he was Baltimore's mayor, or maybe he's just trying to burnish his crime-fighting credentials ahead of his anticipated 2016 presidential bid. Either way, his recent comments criticizing the rising murder rate and declining number of arrests in the city - and his implicit swipe against Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony Batts -...
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