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By Frank Langfitt and Marina Sarris and Frank Langfitt and Marina Sarris,Mason-Dixon Political/Media Research Inc.Sun Staff Writers | July 22, 1994
As the Maryland political campaign heats up, crime and drugs remain the foremost issues on voters' minds, a poll released yesterday found.Thirty-eight percent of those interviewed ranked crime and drugs as the single most important issue facing the state, while 19 percent chose the economy and jobs.Health care, which is dominating the domestic policy debate in Washington, finished a distant fifth, with only 9 percent ranking it as most important as a state issue.Although crime was the top issue in the poll, two-thirds of respondents said they still felt safe walking down their streets at night.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
Baltimore residents are less satisfied with city services than they were last year, but see progress in the city's long-standing fight against violent crime and illegal drugs. Those are some of the mixed findings in the annual Baltimore Citizen Survey, which the University of Baltimore's Schaefer Center for Public Policy completed in October and the Rawlings-Blake administration released Friday. In a statement, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said she's committed to improving Baltimore through "responsible budgeting and focusing on the top priorities of current city residents.
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NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | December 28, 1992
BARCELONA -- With less than a week remaining before th European Community officially eliminates its internal border controls, the frontiers are already humming with a deadly commerce that no one foresaw when the Common Market was launched a generation ago.As the EC liberalizes its trade policies to grease the wheels of legitimate trade, a rogue's gallery of organized crime is moving in on the action.Drawn by open commercial frontiers in the West -- and exploiting political chaos in the former Communist East and the Third World -- international drug rings dealing in heroin and cocaine have begun a wave of terror that crime experts across the continent say is spinning out of control.
NEWS
By Laurie O. Robinson and Jeff Slowikowski | January 31, 2011
"Scared straight" programs have long been wildly popular in this country as a get-tough response to juvenile crime. They typically involve bringing at-risk youths into an adult prison, where they are confronted — in shocking and brutal fashion — by adult inmates. These programs may include tours of the facility and personal stories from prisoners and may even integrate the youths into the prison population for up to a day. Experiencing the harsh reality of life behind bars is thought to deter kids from a life of crime by frightening them into changing their behavior.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
A few years ago, Ruth Jones was ready to give up. She ha just become manager of Allen Apartments in Annapolis, and the illegal drug sales and other crime seemed overwhelming."
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1994
State and local police officers are urging residents of Carroll County to join their neighbors in the 11th annual "National Night Out" from 7 p.m. until 10 p.m. today.When residents turn on their outside lights, lock their doors and spend the evening outdoors with friends and neighbors, they will join more than 26 million people in 8,600 communities across the United States and Canada in demonstrating solidarity against crime, drugs and violence, according to city and state police spokesmen.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
Gov. William Donald Schaefer did something infinitely more satisfying yesterday than trying to salvage government programs in a time of tight money: He saluted some 140 citizens who have found their own ways to fight the scourges of crime and drugs.Assembled in a hot conference room at the Columbia Hilton, the citizens came from communities as diverse as Baltimore's Cherry Hill section and Silver Spring, Hagerstown and Chestertown. The occasion was a daylong program in which community leaders -- most of them volunteers -- traded the secrets of what has worked in their neighborhoods.
NEWS
March 9, 2008
Crime and drugs go hand-in-hand in Baltimore, and both problems are exacerbated by the inability of some city judges to properly evaluate a defendant's drug problem and the lack of sufficient treatment options, particularly for those who commit crimes to support their habit. That reality is reinforced by local judges who vented their frustration about how the criminal justice system handles low-level, nonviolent drug offenders in a new study by a Washington-based think tank. Fixing the problem could save lives.
NEWS
October 4, 1990
The Guardian Angels, colorfully attired crime-busters whose methods have been criticized as little better than vigilantism, are leaving Baltimore again -- victims, they claim, of harassment by local police. This is the second time the group has offered its services to the city, stayed a while, then departed after wearing out its welcome. Let's hope it will be the last.Granted, many of the young men who volunteered for the groups' nightly street patrols no doubt were well-intentioned. And no doubt some residents of the drug-and-violence besieged neighborhoods where the Angels set up operations genuinely believed the group was accomplishing something, and are sad to see it go. But it was inevitable these self-appointed guardians of the public order eventually would clash with police, who quite rightly feel they alone are legally empowered to use force.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
Candidates for the 7th Congressional District seat appearing at an NAACP-sponsored forum last night outlined their plans for improving the economy, education and health care.The Randallstown forum, sponsored by the Baltimore County branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, was attended by more than 100 people.Nearly all of the candidates agreed that creating jobs is the key to economic revitalization of the district, which includes inner-city neighborhoods in West and East Baltimore and portions of Baltimore County stretching from Catonsville to Randallstown.
NEWS
March 9, 2008
Crime and drugs go hand-in-hand in Baltimore, and both problems are exacerbated by the inability of some city judges to properly evaluate a defendant's drug problem and the lack of sufficient treatment options, particularly for those who commit crimes to support their habit. That reality is reinforced by local judges who vented their frustration about how the criminal justice system handles low-level, nonviolent drug offenders in a new study by a Washington-based think tank. Fixing the problem could save lives.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2003
The Stafford Apartments, an elegant Mount Vernon landmark with a troubled recent past, is to be converted from low-income housing to dorms for Peabody Institute's music students by next fall, the building's owner says. "That's our schedule," said Patti Shwayder, senior vice president of Denver-based AIMCO Inc. "Of course, anything can happen, but it seems to be proceeding along." The news has elicited cheers from some neighbors and business leaders. They say drugs and crimes linked to the Stafford have tarnished Mount Vernon Place, often called one of the prettiest urban squares in the nation.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2003
As she enters the Parham Court townhouse in Stillmeadows, Wanda Hebron sidesteps the overdue Blockbuster videotapes, the dirt-crusted candy wrappers, the loose tobacco and empty crack bags. "This is the kind of stuff we're going up against," said Hebron, the president of Stillmeadows' condominium association. Once a desirable neighborhood of affordable, owner-occupied townhomes in western Anne Arundel County, Stillmeadows is now fighting some of the crime, drugs and blight that have engulfed neighborhoods around it. Stillmeadows residents say that as the county has stepped up enforcement efforts in nearby Pioneer City and its most dangerous street, Arwell Court, drug dealers and rogue tenants are moving to their community.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson, Laurie Willis and Laura Vozzella and M. Dion Thompson, Laurie Willis and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2002
Many of the old homes in the East Oliver neighborhood have been knocked down or stand empty now. Weeds overpower abandoned front yards. RIP tags are spray-painted on walls and the fronts of vacant houses lining block after block of East Preston Street, where the drug boys who call themselves the "283 crew" own some corners. It can be a safe street, as long as you mind your own business. Dorothy Knight and the other volunteers who run the soup kitchen every Friday at Knox Presbyterian Church know the rules and say they are not afraid to walk through the sometimes violent world around them.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2002
It used to be that when you saw ex-convicts like Samuel Jones roaming the streets of Druid Heights in West Baltimore, they were selling addicts their next highs or chasing their own. But as members of the Druid Heights Peace Patrol, men like Jones - former prisoners and recovering drug addicts - now deal peace on the streets of a community where they once were considered part of its blight. Armed with notepads, leaflets and a desire to make Druid Heights safer, the men volunteer to walk side by side with like-minded residents and a police escort, documenting neighborhood conditions - from vacant rowhouses to trash-strewn corners.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
About 50 residents turned out last night for a forum sponsored by Howard County police in Oakland Mills, where concerns about crime have heightened since two unidentified men exchanged gunfire near the village center last month.Police Chief Wayne Livesay and other officers attended the meeting, which lasted about two hours and was aimed at establishing an anti-crime network that will help the village deal with problems ranging from robbery to drug abuse."We can't do it without you, and you can't do it without us," said police Cpl. Paul Steppe of the Community Services Division.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | November 6, 1994
The once decorous state Senate race in northwestern Baltimore County has turned nasty, with incumbent Democrat Paula C. Hollinger and GOP challenger Richard J. Manski hurling accusations of lying and distortion.Ms. Hollinger was furious Friday about a Manski campaign brochure that included a "Special Crime Alert Insert!" The insert showed a photo of drug paraphernalia with the caption, "Free Heroin and Crack for Addicts," Paula Hollinger, Baltimore Sun, 10/10/94.She complained that her remarks had been distorted and taken out of context.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1996
Setting new priorities for officers on the street, Baltimore's police commissioner is directing them to concentrate on seizing guns and to de-emphasize arrests for possessing small quantities of drugs.Carefully wording his statements to assure residents that street dealers will still be targeted, Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier said it is not worth an officer's time to look for people carrying a few small bags of cocaine or heroin."We think that guns and gun violence is where we should focus our energy, not drugs and drug arrests," Mr. Frazier said in an interview, elaborating on a five-page letter being sent this week to the department's 3,100 police officers.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
Candidates for the 7th Congressional District seat appearing at an NAACP-sponsored forum last night outlined their plans for improving the economy, education and health care.The Randallstown forum, sponsored by the Baltimore County branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, was attended by more than 100 people.Nearly all of the candidates agreed that creating jobs is the key to economic revitalization of the district, which includes inner-city neighborhoods in West and East Baltimore and portions of Baltimore County stretching from Catonsville to Randallstown.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1996
Setting new priorities for officers on the street, Baltimore's police commissioner is directing them to concentrate on seizing guns and to de-emphasize arrests for possessing small quantities of drugs.Carefully wording his statements to assure residents that street dealers will still be targeted, Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier said it is not worth an officer's time to look for people carrying a few small bags of cocaine or heroin."We think that guns and gun violence is where we should focus our energy, not drugs and drug arrests," Mr. Frazier said in an interview, elaborating on a five-page letter being sent this week to the department's 3,100 police officers.
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