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NEWS
November 27, 2007
A second public meeting is scheduled for tonight on a proposal for a cricket field on Baltimore County-owned property near Loch Raven Reservoir. The meeting will let the county Department of Recreation and Parks gather input from the community on the proposed use of Cloverland Park, a property formerly known as the Maryland Golf Academy site, near Towson Golf and Country Club and the former Peerce's Plantation restaurant. The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. at Jacksonville Elementary School, 3400 Hillendale Heights Road.
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SPORTS
By Jordan Littman, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
On the cricket field at the South Germantown Recreational Park on Sunday afternoon, Jamie Harrison saw his dream come true. Dozens of parents and fans gathered to watch his plan of three years finally come to fruition: two teams battle for the Maryland Youth Cricket Championship, the first such event in United States history. The event saw the Germantown Kids Cricket Club win the state title over Cockeysville Kids Cricket, 25-23, after a one-month, four-team tournament. "This is something happening in front of me that I envisioned and imagined and thought that could happen," said Harrison, the founder and president of the United States Youth Cricket Association.
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EXPLORE
December 19, 2012
Reading the article, "Some residents upset with cricket field plan," (Dec. 6) brings up a question: Who are these "incumbent users" and why do they think they have priority in using a public park? A cricket field will be usable by the diversifying ethnic population. Is it the fact that many cricket players represent that diverse population that has people upset? Is it because they don't understand the rules or have never attempted the game? I suspect so. Perhaps these people would do well to remember that five or six decades ago, soccer was virtually unknown in the U.S. In fact, soccer was brought to this country by immigrants who had played it throughout Europe.
EXPLORE
December 19, 2012
Reading the article, "Some residents upset with cricket field plan," (Dec. 6) brings up a question: Who are these "incumbent users" and why do they think they have priority in using a public park? A cricket field will be usable by the diversifying ethnic population. Is it the fact that many cricket players represent that diverse population that has people upset? Is it because they don't understand the rules or have never attempted the game? I suspect so. Perhaps these people would do well to remember that five or six decades ago, soccer was virtually unknown in the U.S. In fact, soccer was brought to this country by immigrants who had played it throughout Europe.
SPORTS
By Jordan Littman, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
On the cricket field at the South Germantown Recreational Park on Sunday afternoon, Jamie Harrison saw his dream come true. Dozens of parents and fans gathered to watch his plan of three years finally come to fruition: two teams battle for the Maryland Youth Cricket Championship, the first such event in United States history. The event saw the Germantown Kids Cricket Club win the state title over Cockeysville Kids Cricket, 25-23, after a one-month, four-team tournament. "This is something happening in front of me that I envisioned and imagined and thought that could happen," said Harrison, the founder and president of the United States Youth Cricket Association.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1997
Expect heads to turn tomorrow as the Baltimore Cricket Club introduces the gentlemanly sport to West Baltimore youngsters who don't know a wicket from a wombat.The group also is inaugurating a new home in Leon Day Park. In an exhibition match against Washington-area players, the club hopes to attract youths from nearby basketball courts and other hangouts to check out the sport."This is what we promised the city: Provide us the field and we will teach the sport to young people," said John Hay, a longtime club member.
NEWS
By Fauzia Salman | February 20, 2007
With the Cricket World Cup coming next month, the air is full of speculation about another Pakistan-India match. Cricket is more than a sport for Pakistanis and Indians. It is a cult followed by millions across the subcontinent with a passion inconceivable even to ardent American football and baseball fans. Devotion to cricket is synonymous with patriotism. Political leaders, media icons and the general public all join in the hysteria. Matches between the two rival cricketing nations foster incredible emotional energy.
NEWS
By Paul Watson and Paul Watson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 18, 2004
SRINAGAR, India - Prime Minister Manmohan Singh made his first visit as India's leader to the disputed Kashmir region yesterday and offered to hold unconditional peace talks with any separatists there who would shun violence. But a moderate separatist leader expressed disappointment at the invitation, which came as India began a limited withdrawal of troops from the region. "My brothers and sisters, my doors are open to all those who are ready to talk to me peacefully," Singh said from behind a wall of bulletproof glass in the summer capital of India's Jammu and Kashmir state.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | December 17, 2007
For now, the fields at Cloverland Park in northern Baltimore County are bare, save for swirls of yellowed grass and the occasional deer track. But by summer, athletes are expected to be scurrying across a manicured playing field here. Dressed in white and thwacking leather balls at a wooden wicket, they won't be playing baseball or lacrosse or any of the sports more commonly associated with this region. They will be playing cricket.
NEWS
By BILL GLAUBER and BILL GLAUBER,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 5, 1999
ALDWORTH, England -- The Bell Inn is a bar, two rooms and adjoining cricket field. It's worn wooden benches, sweet amber beer and warm winter soup. It's Ian Macaulay, a pipe-smoking, 73-year-old pub patriarch who presides over a family-run business handed down through five generations of the same family.And it's among the hardy survivors of a cherished tradition -- the British country pub."I suppose with the patrons, in the back of their minds, this is what a pub should be," Macaulay says.
NEWS
November 27, 2007
A second public meeting is scheduled for tonight on a proposal for a cricket field on Baltimore County-owned property near Loch Raven Reservoir. The meeting will let the county Department of Recreation and Parks gather input from the community on the proposed use of Cloverland Park, a property formerly known as the Maryland Golf Academy site, near Towson Golf and Country Club and the former Peerce's Plantation restaurant. The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. at Jacksonville Elementary School, 3400 Hillendale Heights Road.
NEWS
By Fauzia Salman | February 20, 2007
With the Cricket World Cup coming next month, the air is full of speculation about another Pakistan-India match. Cricket is more than a sport for Pakistanis and Indians. It is a cult followed by millions across the subcontinent with a passion inconceivable even to ardent American football and baseball fans. Devotion to cricket is synonymous with patriotism. Political leaders, media icons and the general public all join in the hysteria. Matches between the two rival cricketing nations foster incredible emotional energy.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1997
Expect heads to turn tomorrow as the Baltimore Cricket Club introduces the gentlemanly sport to West Baltimore youngsters who don't know a wicket from a wombat.The group also is inaugurating a new home in Leon Day Park. In an exhibition match against Washington-area players, the club hopes to attract youths from nearby basketball courts and other hangouts to check out the sport."This is what we promised the city: Provide us the field and we will teach the sport to young people," said John Hay, a longtime club member.
NEWS
By Nancy Knisley and Nancy Knisley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 16, 2000
Daniel Parrott, captain of The Pride of Baltimore II, says he lives a storybook life -- and as someone whose earliest adventures came by way of storybooks, he ought to know. Just as his imagination was stirred by "Robinson Crusoe," "Treasure Island" and other books about the sea that he read as a boy, Parrott's work is the kind to inspire imagination. As captain of the 185-ton topsail schooner since June 1998, he has sailed the world's oceans as a goodwill ambassador for Maryland. Sometimes he steps backs for a moment and asks himself, "Can you believe this?"
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 8, 2000
CAMBRIDGE, England -- We're not at Camden Yards anymore, hon. To get to yesterday's opening day of the English cricket season, turn right at the war memorial, right at the church steeple, follow a brick wall around a corner, and walk straight into the 19th century. There, you find 22 players, dressed in white, a bunch of kids who study classics and history and play for Cambridge University, against old pros with a team representing the county of Lancashire. You sit on a splintery wooden bench, joining about 200 others who are arrayed around a field that seems to be about the size of Towson.
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