Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCrichton
IN THE NEWS

Crichton

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 21, 1999
A new techno-thriller by Michael Crichton is always a supercharged commercial publishing event in the American book industry. Along with a tiny handful of others -- mostly women who also manufacture trademark-formula fiction forms with the clockwork of Henry Ford's first assembly line -- Crichton cranks out guaranteed megasellers.The latest Crichton was launched last week with full-page newspaper ads and the squealing of hundreds of 18-wheelers' tires: The publisher, Alfred A. Knopf, puffed that the first hardcover printing is 1.5 million copies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Climb the stairs to Gregory Paul's third-floor Charles Village apartment and you may quickly find yourself slipping back 100 million years or more into the Mesozoic era. The Baltimore artist's walls are filled with lush portraits of dinosaurian wildlife in action, many in color. Tyrannosaurs step off across mud flats on a sunset hunt. A pair of feathered Archaeopteryx cavort like gulls at the surf line of an ancient beach. The dynamic scenes are part of his work for the new Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs — but Paul, 56, a self-taught paleontologist, full-time illustrator, author and dino-consultant to TV, museums and the movies, is no newcomer.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 19, 1994
"ER" has to improve.zTC Anyone who has seen even a slice of an episode of "St. Elsewhere" knows how good medical dramas can be. Let's be kind and not compare "ER," which will premiere at 9 tonight on WBAL (Channel 11), to "St. Elsewhere" just yet.Based on the fact that Michael ("Jurassic Park") Crichton is executive producer, let's just believe for now that the drama about life, death and bad coffee in an emergency room is going to get better. But based on how little improvement from the rough cut of the pilot seen in August to the finished version of the first two episodes, which I saw last week, I admit that such belief might be a big mistake.
NEWS
By Dennis McLellan and Dennis McLellan,Los Angeles Times | November 6, 2008
LOS ANGELES - Michael Crichton, the doctor-turned-author of best-selling thrillers such as The Terminal Man and Jurassic Park and a Hollywood writer and director whose credits include Westworld and Coma, has died. He was 66. Dr. Crichton died in Los Angeles on Tuesday "after a courageous and private battle against cancer," his family said in a statement. For nearly four decades, the 6-foot-9 writer was a towering presence in the worlds of publishing and filmmaking. "There was no one like Crichton, because he could both entertain and educate," Lynn Nesbit, Dr. Crichton's agent since the late 1960s, told the Los Angeles Times yesterday.
FEATURES
By Josh Getlin and Josh Getlin,Los Angeles Times | January 25, 1994
Michael Crichton looks like a winner but feels like a dinosaur.True, he stands to make millions from his new novel, "Disclosure," just as he did with "Jurassic Park," "Rising Sun" and other blockbusters. Yet to hear him talk, he and other free-thinkers face extinction in a fight for survival with feminists and the pooh-bahs of political correctness."There's absolutely a chill in the workplace these days," Mr. Crichton says, picking lint off his Armani suit and scowling down at Central Park, 43 floors below his hotel suite.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | August 20, 1993
Of course you bought one of the 9 million copies of "Jurassic Park" in print, and certainly you've seen the movie. But if you've still got brontosauruses on the brain, take note:The illustrated gift edition of "Jurassic Park" is out. All yours, for $35.Today, publisher Alfred A. Knopf is releasing 15,000 copies of a special-edition hard-cover printing of Michael Crichton's best-selling novel, which was originally published in hardback in November 1990.The...
NEWS
By SARAH WEINMAN and SARAH WEINMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2006
City of Shadows Ariana Franklin Malicious Intent Kathryn Fox Harper Paperbacks / 380 pages / $13.95 A good forensic thriller is difficult to find; too many of them rely too heavily on jargon and stock characters to advance the story, leading to too much forensic and not enough thriller. Fortunately, Kathryn Fox, an Australia-based doctor, fuses both elements with a sure touch because she renders her heroine, freelance forensic pathologist Anya Crichton, as a human being whose life is endangered by the work she does.
FEATURES
By Merrill Goozner and Merrill Goozner,Chicago Tribune | September 3, 1993
Japanese moviegoers will have to wait a while before dawn breaks for the controversial movie "Rising Sun."The long-planned October release of the movie made from the Michael Crichton thriller has been postponed until at least February, possibly later. The delay came after picketing by Asian-American groups at the U.S. opening of the movie and after charges it engages in "Japan bashing" received widespread publicity.A spokesman in Tokyo for 20th Century Fox Far East says the company needed time to rework the trailers and ads for the film.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | January 20, 1994
The sexes, already at daggers drawn about so many things, now have something new to scrap about. It is Michael Crichton's novel ''Disclosure,'' number one this coming weekend on the New York Times best-seller list, with about one million copies already in print and the movie rights sold for $3.5 million.Its subject is sexual harassment of an employee by his boss. A woman boss. Batten down the hatches.Mr. Crichton has sold more than 100 million books worldwide -- 30 million in the United States in the last 18 months alone -- because his raw material (the adjective is just right)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 3, 1993
RISING SUN(Fox, priced for rental, rated R) 1993Author Michael Crichton was on a cinematic roll this summer, with his two most recent novels -- "Rising Sun" and, of course, "Jurassic Park" -- being turned into nearly simultaneous box-office blockbusters.Mr. Crichton said in an interview before the opening of "Rising Sun" that, unlike "Jurassic Park," for which he wrote the screenplay, he had disassociated himself with "Rising Sun" early in the pre-production stages. In addition to having a different vision than director Philip Kaufman of the direction the film should take, Mr. Crichton said the task of rewriting and editing what he had already spent months creating was a daunting prospect, something he did not relish even with "Jurassic Park."
NEWS
By SARAH WEINMAN and SARAH WEINMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2006
City of Shadows Ariana Franklin Malicious Intent Kathryn Fox Harper Paperbacks / 380 pages / $13.95 A good forensic thriller is difficult to find; too many of them rely too heavily on jargon and stock characters to advance the story, leading to too much forensic and not enough thriller. Fortunately, Kathryn Fox, an Australia-based doctor, fuses both elements with a sure touch because she renders her heroine, freelance forensic pathologist Anya Crichton, as a human being whose life is endangered by the work she does.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2005
Hot on the heels of Jose Canseco's controversial book on baseball and steroids, agent Doug Ames is pitching a tell-all football book by the Columbia, S.C., doctor under a federal steroids investigation. "It will shock a lot of people," Ames said yesterday from New York, where he and Dr. James Shortt have been visiting book publishers. Shortt is under investigation by state and federal authorities for prescribing steroids. CBS News reported last week that three players with the Carolina Panthers filled testosterone prescriptions issued by Shortt two weeks before they played in the February 2004 Super Bowl.
FEATURES
By Bettijane Levine and Bettijane Levine,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2002
LOS ANGELES -- Michael Crichton turns out to be as oddly compelling in person as his weird creatures are on paper. Crichton's the father of the techno-thriller, the guy who dreamed up cloned dinos roaming Jurassic Park and more than a dozen other best-selling books of futuristic fiction loosely based on scientific facts. Now he's come up with Prey, yet another tale of technology gone amok, featuring a monster you wouldn't want to reckon with. This one is actually a swarm of nano-particles -- each less than half the thickness of a human hair -- teensy machines with cameras built in. They have the ability to reproduce and evolve independent of the humans who created them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 21, 1999
A new techno-thriller by Michael Crichton is always a supercharged commercial publishing event in the American book industry. Along with a tiny handful of others -- mostly women who also manufacture trademark-formula fiction forms with the clockwork of Henry Ford's first assembly line -- Crichton cranks out guaranteed megasellers.The latest Crichton was launched last week with full-page newspaper ads and the squealing of hundreds of 18-wheelers' tires: The publisher, Alfred A. Knopf, puffed that the first hardcover printing is 1.5 million copies.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH TEACHOUT and ELIZABETH TEACHOUT,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 8, 1996
"Airframe," by Michael Crichton. Knopf. 368 pages. $26.How do you know when Michael Crichton has turned out one of his best novels? When you're afraid that reading it will ruin the movie for you.At his best, Crichton has turned out stuff from "Jurassic Park" to "ER" that has proven compulsively screenworthy. Add "Airframe," his new novel about the airline industry, to this list. It's a one-sitting read that will cause a lifetime of white-knuckled nightmares - and this in spite of the slipshod quality of the writing.
NEWS
By JOHN R. ALDEN and JOHN R. ALDEN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 1995
Dinosaurs are rising from the dead. That, at least, is what a glance at the new novels section of any library or bookstore would seem to prove. But while dinosaurs deserve resurrection as much as the dodo or the great auk, the triumphant return of these hulking brutes to the literary stage is a mixed blessing. I'm ready to send all those fictional saurians back to the museums from whence they came.It has nothing to do with literary merit. Yes, "The Lost World" (Knopf. 393 pages. $25.95), Michael Crichton's sequel to "Jurassic Park," is clunky and dumb.
NEWS
By Doug Struck | December 16, 1990
There have been conscientious objectors for as long as there have been wars. And in this country, the military has never quite known what to do with them.Revolutionary militia marched off to battle without bothering those in the community who were known to have religious prohibitions against war, according to Jim Crichton, a counselor for the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Friends (Quakers).In the Civil War, with no such community understanding, objectors were often conscripted and cruelly treated if they continued to refuse.
NEWS
By JOHN R. ALDEN and JOHN R. ALDEN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 1995
Dinosaurs are rising from the dead. That, at least, is what a glance at the new novels section of any library or bookstore would seem to prove. But while dinosaurs deserve resurrection as much as the dodo or the great auk, the triumphant return of these hulking brutes to the literary stage is a mixed blessing. I'm ready to send all those fictional saurians back to the museums from whence they came.It has nothing to do with literary merit. Yes, "The Lost World" (Knopf. 393 pages. $25.95), Michael Crichton's sequel to "Jurassic Park," is clunky and dumb.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 9, 1995
Is Bob Dole secretly behind "Congo"?No movie has made or will make the Republican senator and presidential candidate seem more right in his assault on debased popular culture than this tawdry, cruel, ugly exercise in cynicism and utter insensitivity. Isn't it a little late in the game to expect an audience to get with a film that watches gleefully as guys with automatic weapons mow down an unknown species of gray gorilla? Talk about natural born killers!OK, they're only men in monkey suits, and as a movie illusion, the old man-in-the-monkey-suit bit hasn't advanced much beyond the '40s and "Ramar of the Jungle."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 19, 1994
"ER" has to improve.zTC Anyone who has seen even a slice of an episode of "St. Elsewhere" knows how good medical dramas can be. Let's be kind and not compare "ER," which will premiere at 9 tonight on WBAL (Channel 11), to "St. Elsewhere" just yet.Based on the fact that Michael ("Jurassic Park") Crichton is executive producer, let's just believe for now that the drama about life, death and bad coffee in an emergency room is going to get better. But based on how little improvement from the rough cut of the pilot seen in August to the finished version of the first two episodes, which I saw last week, I admit that such belief might be a big mistake.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.