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NEWS
May 24, 2011
After reading your article ("Maryland task force recommends banning crib bumpers," May 20) on Maryland possibly banning the crib bumpers, I definitely find myself on the side of banning them. Granted, I'm only a teenage babysitter, and I won't have the responsibility of a child for many, many years, but I had never even thought that there were "dangers of bruising" or any other type of reason to install the bumpers in the first place. I agree with the members of the task force that say babies can't exert the force to hit their head on a side of the crib hard enough to bruise.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
Despite several years of declines and a public health campaign, the number of babies in Baltimore who die while sleeping in a bed with a parent or caregiver remains a persistent concern, the city's health commissioner said. Dr. Oxiris Barbot said she is concerned about the number of "co-sleeping" deaths this year: There have been 11 confirmed cases of sleep-related infant deaths, a category that includes babies who were smothered by someone accidentally rolling over on them as well as incidents of sudden infant death syndrome or other unexplained causes of death.
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FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
As Andrea Walker reported last week , Maryland is a step closer to being the first state to ban the sale of most crib bumpers due to possible suffocation risk. When my first child was born in 2008, I didn't bother buying a whole crib set because I had heard about the risks, and I didn't see the need for getting a comforter for a baby anyway. (Had I thought it through, I would have realized that when we started using the crib as a toddler bed, the comforter would have been nice, but we did just fine with blankets.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
A ban on decorative bumpers that line a baby's crib goes into effect in Maryland Friday. The ban applies to crib bumpers that are made of non-mesh type material and sit directly above the mattress. The ban does not apply to vertical bumpers that wrap tightly around individual crib rails or to mesh crib liners. State health officials will issue a warning to anyone who ships or sells crib bumpers to consumers in Maryland. Retailers who continue to violate the regulation after a warning can receive a fine of up to $500 for each crib bumper shipped or sold.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
The state will consider adopting voluntary safety standards rather than an all-out ban on bumper pads that line the inside of cribs and have been determined a hazard to babies. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been pushing regulations that would make it the first state to ban the sale of bumper pads, but said Friday it will hold hearings to look at voluntary safety standards adopted by the manufacturers. Studies have found that the bumper pads, often included as part of bedding sets, can suffocate or strangle babies.
BUSINESS
By a Sun Staff Writer | July 19, 1994
Children's furniture chain Crib n' Cradle held deposits from 758 people when it shut down last month, a merchandise liquidator said yesterday, far more than the 150-plus estimate that was reported earlier.Crib n' Cradle, based in Severna Park, agreed to turn over its assets to creditors after it became unable to pay bills. Liquidator Steven Haas, hired by the creditors to sort through Crib n' Cradle's books and goods, said yesterday that deposits for undelivered goods add up to more than $100,000.
FEATURES
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | July 5, 1998
Q.Earlier this year, my daughter and her husband installed bunk beds in their 2-year-old son's room in preparation for the birth of their second child. They gave Jake a couple of months to make the change to a "grown-up" bed and allowed another month to put his dismantled crib out of sight before the baby arrived and the crib was set up in her room.However, Jake refused to give up his crib. As the birth date approached, his parents sought the advice of their pediatrician on how best to persuade him to make the change.
NEWS
November 22, 1991
An autopsy was set for today to determine the cause of death of a West Baltimore baby found dead yesterday in her crib.A city homicide detective said Grace Raney, 2 1/2 months, of the 600 block of Baker St., was pronounced dead shortly after 5 p.m. by the crew of a Fire Department ambulance after her mother, Tammy Wallace, called to report her child was unconscious and cold.Western District police also responded to the call and began an investigation.Police said the baby had been dead for two to three hours.
NEWS
By kate shatzkin and kate shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | September 22, 2008
Commenter Kelly asked for tips on transitioning a 20-month-old toddler from the crib to a "big-kid" bed. Kim West, a Severna Park social worker who specializes in helping families get children to sleep, has a simple answer: Don't do it yet. She says many parents make the mistake of trying to get a child into a big bed too early, perhaps to free up the crib for a new sibling. "I worry a lot about a 20-month-old roaming around in his room at night, pulling out drawers, unplugging lamps, exercising all that wonderful but potentially hazardous curiosity," she wrote in a recent newsletter from her practice.
NEWS
By Maurice Possley and Maurice Possley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 22, 2007
CHICAGO -- Federal regulators recalled about 1 million cribs yesterday because the drop rail on some of the nation's best-selling models can detach from the crib's frame, creating a dangerous gap that has led to the deaths of at least three children. After inquiries from the Chicago Tribune for an investigation of Simplicity cribs, the Consumer Product Safety Commission announced the recall of cribs sold under both the Simplicity and Graco names. Covering all cribs made by Simplicity between 1998 and May 2007, it is the largest recall of full-size cribs since the safety commission was created in the 1970s.
FEATURES
By Tricia Bishop,
The Baltimore Sun
| June 18, 2013
Mothers typically hear it in the hospital: "'Back is best' for baby's sleep. " But dads don't often get the message, leading Baltimore agencies to launch a safe-sleep campaign Tuesday aimed at fathers.  The initiative includes a video  with three dads spelling out why ABC -- alone, back, crib -- is the preferred method to put a baby to bed.  “Over the last three years, we've taught Baltimore mothers about the important role safe sleep...
HEALTH
By Andea K. Walker | February 28, 2013
Legislation pending in the General Assembly challenges new regulations to go into affect this summer that would ban decorative bumpers that line the inside of baby cribs. The bill introduced by Sen. John C. Astle, an Anne Arundel County Democrat, w ould allow crib bumpers that meet standards set up by The American Society for Testing and Materials. The state ban takes affect June 21 and prohibits the sale of pads made of nonmesh material that rest on the crib mattress and run the circumference of the crib . It does not apply to mesh bumpers or those that wrap around crib rails.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
Baltimore homicide detectives are investigating the death of an infant who was found in his Northeast Baltimore home Wednesday afternoon. The father of the four-month-old boy told investigators that he had put the child in his crib with a bottle and returned more than an hour later to find him face down and unresponsive. The child was rushed to Johns Hopkins Hospital where he was pronounced dead at 3:02 p.m. The family's home is located on the 2100 block of Belair Road on the edge of the Four by Four neighborhood.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
Maryland health officials have published final regulations to prohibit the sale of decorative bumpers that line the inside of baby cribs, making this the first state with such a ban. The regulations issued by the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene go into effect June 21. The ban comes amid heightened concern about bumpers, which have been found to suffocate and strangle babies. Older babies can use the bumpers to climb out of the crib and fall, studies have also found.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
The state will consider adopting voluntary safety standards rather than an all-out ban on bumper pads that line the inside of cribs and have been determined a hazard to babies. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been pushing regulations that would make it the first state to ban the sale of bumper pads, but said Friday it will hold hearings to look at voluntary safety standards adopted by the manufacturers. Studies have found that the bumper pads, often included as part of bedding sets, can suffocate or strangle babies.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
As Andrea Walker reported last week , Maryland is a step closer to being the first state to ban the sale of most crib bumpers due to possible suffocation risk. When my first child was born in 2008, I didn't bother buying a whole crib set because I had heard about the risks, and I didn't see the need for getting a comforter for a baby anyway. (Had I thought it through, I would have realized that when we started using the crib as a toddler bed, the comforter would have been nice, but we did just fine with blankets.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
Baltimore homicide detectives are investigating the death of an infant who was found in his Northeast Baltimore home Wednesday afternoon. The father of the four-month-old boy told investigators that he had put the child in his crib with a bottle and returned more than an hour later to find him face down and unresponsive. The child was rushed to Johns Hopkins Hospital where he was pronounced dead at 3:02 p.m. The family's home is located on the 2100 block of Belair Road on the edge of the Four by Four neighborhood.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | May 6, 2001
When a friend's 17-month-old son got his neck stuck in the collapsing side rails of a portable crib and choked to death, E. Marla Felcher was stunned. Then she got angry. She had assumed it was a freak day care accident, but that wasn't entirely true. The toddler's crib had been recalled five years earlier -- but neither the government nor its manufacturer had done much to inform buyers. Worse, she soon discovered that untested and unsafe products were hardly uncommon in the infant products industry, and that the government's primary watchdog, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, can do little about it. "The problem is that there's no way for a parent to know whether the next thing they buy will perform just like that crib," says Felcher, 44, a former Gillette executive and college professor who grew up in Pikesville and now lives in Cambridge, Mass.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2012
Maryland health officials continued their push to become the first state to ban the sale of bumper pads that line the inside of baby cribs, introducing proposed language Friday for regulations that could go into effect next year. The regulations would forbid retailers from selling bumpers that run around the mattress and have been linked to infant deaths. It would not apply to vertical bumpers that line the upper rails of a crib or those made from mesh. Maryland's proposed ban, which would take effect June 21, 2013, comes amid heightened concern about the safety of crib bumpers.
NEWS
September 29, 2011
Of all the deaths that occur among infants, those caused by so-called crib bumpers — the padded, often brightly colored cushions that line the inside of babies' cribs — may be the easiest to prevent. Crib bumpers serve no real purpose other than the cosmetic, while in some case they can cause serious harm, even death. That's why Maryland health secretary Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein was right to accept an expert panel's recommendation on Tuesday to ban their sale in Maryland. Studies have shown that the pads, which are often marketed as a safety feature, have a negligible effect on reducing injuries caused by infants hitting their heads against the hard surfaces of their crib.
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