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By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1995
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- The ghosts of Augusta National are hiding out among the azaleas and pines, ready to pounce at a moment's notice in the 1995 Masters. They are here, stirring memories, both good and bad, not to mention the emotional juices of those involved.They are here for Ben Crenshaw, bringing back his 60-foot birdie putt and his heartwarming victory in 1984. They are here for Fred Couples, still trying to figure out how his ball ever stayed up at the 12th hole when he won three years ago.They are here for Curtis Strange, recalling his disappointing double-dip-in-the-water defeat a decade ago. They are here for Scott Hoch and Greg Norman, teasing them about blowing another chance at a green jacket.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. - Right around the time major league teams first began taking notice of a talented young outfielder playing at Crenshaw High in South Central Los Angeles, a harsh reality check came for Trayvon Robinson. The Orioles outfielder was in the 10th grade when his mailbox started to fill with questionnaires from big league clubs, inspiring hope in a place where young men are far more likely to become gang members than major league baseball players. Then, one day, shots rang out from outside his family's housing complex.
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SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | September 29, 1999
The Ryder Cup miracle? Everyone will tell you it was the United States team's dramatic and unprecedented comeback on the event's final day.But the comeback never would have occurred without the real Ryder miracle of 1999 -- captain Ben Crenshaw's feat of taking a dozen mostly spoiled, selfish PGA Tour rivals and turning them into a seamless, cohesive team capable of writing such history.The U.S. comeback not only was one of golf's best, but, at the risk of hyperbole, also one of the best seen in any sport.
SPORTS
By Sports on TV | September 3, 2010
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | April 10, 1995
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Ben Crenshaw carried it around with him all week. It wasn't his not-so-secret wish to win the Masters for Harvey Penick, his longtime teacher and confidant who died last Sunday night at age 90.It was his secret weapon.Moments after Crenshaw tapped in his final putt last night at Augusta National to win the 1995 Masters, moments after he collapsed in tears as he plucked out the ball and fell into the arms of caddie Carl Jackson, Crenshaw let the secret weapon out of his bag."
SPORTS
July 6, 1992
LEMONT, Ill. -- Ben Crenshaw broke one two-year streak and extended another with his victory yesterday over Greg Norman in the Western Open.Crenshaw used a late, two-stroke swing to leap-frog over Norman and claim his first victory since 1990."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1999
BROOKLINE, Mass. -- Ben Crenshaw had been saying all week that it would be difficult to sit anybody on the U.S. team in the first day's matches in the 33rd Ryder Cup, because most of his players were adapting so well to the course at The Country Club.Actually, it wasn't that tough, especially after Crenshaw found his team trailing by a point going into yesterday afternoon's four-ball matches. Crenshaw left Mark O'Meara and Steve Pate out of the lineup."It's always frustrating when you can't get out there, but that's the captain's decision," said O'Meara, who came into the competition in the midst of a slump.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1999
MEDINAH, Ill. -- In announcing his two captain's picks for the U.S. Ryder Cup team yesterday at Medinah Country Club, Ben Crenshaw chose blue-collar players he believes care more about the outcome than the income involved in golf's most prestigious team event.The expected choice was Tom Lehman, who has not taken a week off since the end of May in hopes of making his third Ryder Cup team. The less obvious pick was Steve Pate, who will get a second chance after being injured for most of his first.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2001
POTOMAC - Fred Funk called it an unbelievably long day, When asked whether it had been frustrating, Donnie Hammond laughed and said, "You might say that." And that was the likely consensus of the others in the field of 65 who tried to get in 36 holes of golf on the final scheduled day of the Kemper Insurance Open at TPC-Avenel. Their efforts were thwarted by three weather-related interruptions. The final one, early last evening, resulted in a suspension of play, and all but six players who finished their rounds will return this morning to complete the program.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2003
Odell Bradley got a little nervous when he saw a bunch of military fatigues hanging in Matt Crenshaw's closet last week in his apartment near the Indianapolis campus that combines Indiana University and Purdue University into a tiny commuter school called IUPUI. It was shortly after the basketball team had returned from the Mid-Continent Conference tournament in Kansas. IUPUI, in its fifth season playing a Division I schedule and its third year of eligibility for the NCAA tournament, had earned an automatic berth by beating Valparaiso.
SPORTS
April 8, 2006
Augusta, Ga.-- After Ben Crenshaw broke par at the Masters for the first time in 11 years in Thursday's first round, he was asked if he stood any chance of winning the tournament. Crenshaw, a two-time Masters winner, turned away the question with a smile and the gentlest of rebukes. "I've had my time here," he said in his Texas drawl. But after he followed that round with a steady, even-par 72 in yesterday's second round, leaving him five strokes off the lead and very much in contention after 36 holes, he was asked again about daring to dream the impossible.
NEWS
November 6, 2005
On November 2, 2005 GEORGE. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME EAST, 1101 East North Avenue on Sunday after 11 A.M. where services will take place on Monday at 1:30 P.M. See www.marchfh.com.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2003
Odell Bradley got a little nervous when he saw a bunch of military fatigues hanging in Matt Crenshaw's closet last week in his apartment near the Indianapolis campus that combines Indiana University and Purdue University into a tiny commuter school called IUPUI. It was shortly after the basketball team had returned from the Mid-Continent Conference tournament in Kansas. IUPUI, in its fifth season playing a Division I schedule and its third year of eligibility for the NCAA tournament, had earned an automatic berth by beating Valparaiso.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2001
POTOMAC - Fred Funk called it an unbelievably long day, When asked whether it had been frustrating, Donnie Hammond laughed and said, "You might say that." And that was the likely consensus of the others in the field of 65 who tried to get in 36 holes of golf on the final scheduled day of the Kemper Insurance Open at TPC-Avenel. Their efforts were thwarted by three weather-related interruptions. The final one, early last evening, resulted in a suspension of play, and all but six players who finished their rounds will return this morning to complete the program.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | September 29, 1999
The Ryder Cup miracle? Everyone will tell you it was the United States team's dramatic and unprecedented comeback on the event's final day.But the comeback never would have occurred without the real Ryder miracle of 1999 -- captain Ben Crenshaw's feat of taking a dozen mostly spoiled, selfish PGA Tour rivals and turning them into a seamless, cohesive team capable of writing such history.The U.S. comeback not only was one of golf's best, but, at the risk of hyperbole, also one of the best seen in any sport.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1999
BROOKLINE, Mass. -- When the golf cart carrying Ben Crenshaw stopped at the crest of a hill leading up to the 12th green at The Country Club yesterday morning, the U.S. Ryder Cup captain jumped out and spotted an old friend."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1999
BROOKLINE, Mass. -- When the golf cart carrying Ben Crenshaw stopped at the crest of a hill leading up to the 12th green at The Country Club yesterday morning, the U.S. Ryder Cup captain jumped out and spotted an old friend."
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | April 24, 1995
Dr. Marion Carlyle Crenshaw Jr., chairman of the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology since 1980, was killed in a weekend traffic accident when he swerved to avoid a dog.Dr. Crenshaw, 64, who lived in Baltimore's Guilford section, was driving to his country home in Easton in a minivan after dropping off his wife at Baltimore-Washington International Airport when the accident occurred about 5 p.m. Saturday on U.S. 50 near Skipton Creek in Talbot County.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1999
BROOKLINE, Mass. -- Ben Crenshaw had been saying all week that it would be difficult to sit anybody on the U.S. team in the first day's matches in the 33rd Ryder Cup, because most of his players were adapting so well to the course at The Country Club.Actually, it wasn't that tough, especially after Crenshaw found his team trailing by a point going into yesterday afternoon's four-ball matches. Crenshaw left Mark O'Meara and Steve Pate out of the lineup."It's always frustrating when you can't get out there, but that's the captain's decision," said O'Meara, who came into the competition in the midst of a slump.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1999
BROOKLINE, Mass. -- As a 16-year-old high school phenom from Texas, Ben Crenshaw came to The Country Club for the 1968 U.S. Junior Amateur. He wound up losing in the semifinals, but his disappointment in the result was overshadowed by what happened to him at this historic setting that week.He fell in love.The roots of Crenshaw's well-documented passion for the game and its lore can be found here. It's a love affair that has lasted more than three decades and has played a significant part in a career that has been both fulfilling and frustrating.
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