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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 4, 2000
A light midday meal is often far easier to execute than a dinner party. I realized this as I began to plan a luncheon for a good friend. As a first course, I'm going to serve a warm vegetable salad. The main course will be a rich pureed asparagus soup, garnished with dollops of cream fraiche and chopped chives and served with crusty baguettes. Fresh strawberries tossed with sugar and offered with good cookies will end the meal. The soup is uncomplicated to prepare. Some creme fraiche is stirred into it at the last minute.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | October 15, 2008
Creme fraiche is not nearly as fancy as its French name would suggest. It is easy to find, easier to make and imparts a tart but sophisticated taste to everything from raspberries to smoked salmon. "It is like an even more wonderful cream," said chef Frances Chumley of Whole Foods in Annapolis, who demonstrates how simple it is for home cooks to make their own. "The flavor is kind of tangy and a little bit nutty," she said. "And my favorite way to use it is on a nice cobbler, right out of the oven."
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | October 15, 2008
Creme fraiche is not nearly as fancy as its French name would suggest. It is easy to find, easier to make and imparts a tart but sophisticated taste to everything from raspberries to smoked salmon. "It is like an even more wonderful cream," said chef Frances Chumley of Whole Foods in Annapolis, who demonstrates how simple it is for home cooks to make their own. "The flavor is kind of tangy and a little bit nutty," she said. "And my favorite way to use it is on a nice cobbler, right out of the oven."
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | November 4, 2007
After looking through recipes for easy dishes to serve out-of-town company, I have planned an uncomplicated menu that will give me plenty of time for catching up. A white bean soup with kale and chorizo, an all-in-one main course that can be prepared a day ahead, will anchor the meal, and will be accompanied by an arugula salad and a basket of warm bread. For dessert I have decided to make an old favorite - a plum clafoutis. Clafoutis is one of the simplest yet most delicious French desserts a home cook can prepare.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Contributing Writer | July 25, 1993
Because I was intimidated by too many television chef programs, fish poaching was not among my preferred cooking methods. As I watched the masters swaddling a whole fish in cheesecloth and wrestling it into a $150 fish poacher, I decided I'd rather get out the grill. Poaching looked too risky. I could barely fit four hamburgers into my skillet; what could I do with a whitefish?It took me years to realize that poaching enough fish for two is far easier than doing a whole salmon or comparable fish.
NEWS
By JENN GARBEE and JENN GARBEE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 30, 2006
It's hard to imagine French home cooking without a dollop of creme fraiche, that silky, subtly tart cultured cream that has a way of making food taste better. In France, just about every home cook keeps it handy to enrich sauces, dress up cooked vegetables or balance the sweetness of desserts. At A.O.C. in West Hollywood, chef Suzanne Goin mashes fingerling potatoes with butter and Italian parsley, then stirs in a generous dollop of house-made creme fraiche. Luscious, nutty and a little tangy, it's delicious with those earthy potatoes.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 19, 1995
When one discusses "the berries," it's quite possible it's the raspberry being recognized. And raspberries are recognizable nowadays in supermarkets and thickets near you; it is their season.Raspberries are related to the rose and the blackberry. At their best, they are as fragrant as the rose and as sweet as the fattest, juiciest blackberry deep within the thorns.Though raspberries most often are seen in their red glory, there are also black to purple to golden yellow berries.The little seed sacs are called drupelets, and raspberry lovers will chase one across the table if supplies are low.Raspberries are tasty eaten out of hand, folded into fresh fruit tarts, pies, mousses, shortcakes and sorbets, says Carole Bloom in "The International Dictionary of Desserts, Pastries and Confections" (Hearst, $18)
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 29, 2006
Several months ago, while dining at a seafood restaurant in midtown Manhattan, I ordered a first-course crab and avocado salad and was stunned by the simple ingenuity of the dish. Typically, crab salad is mixed with mayonnaise and rarely includes a spicy accent, but this version was bound with creme fraiche and seasoned with cumin. For entertaining, I love traditional recipes that have been reinterpreted with bright new tastes, and this dish certainly falls into that category. Using creme fraiche (the thick French cream that is a cross between heavy cream and sour cream)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | February 24, 2002
Recently, we asked two young women, both students at Amherst College, to come for a casual supper on a Wednesday evening and discuss studying in France for a semester. One of them had just finished a semester in Paris, and the other was getting ready to start hers in the same city. My husband and I both spent a year at the Sorbonne, so we always encourage students to study abroad. The supper was set for 7:30, and because I was busy all that day, I chose a very simple French menu. Appetizers consisted of bowls of black and green ripe olives.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | January 26, 2003
Homemade soups are mainstays of my winter meals. I use them routinely when entertaining during the cold-weather months. Robust creations like gumbos, chili or seafood chowders -- which are really meals in themselves -- become anchors for casual suppers, while lighter versions star in opening roles for the season's dinner parties. The unremitting cold of a New England winter definitely makes a cup of steaming hot soup seem like an elixir, but there are other reasons I find a bowl of warm broth or a creamy vegetable potage irresistible.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | August 26, 2007
I have always been amazed by the delectable ways the French have for preparing eggs. Last month, while in Paris, I ordered an oeuf en cocotte au crabe and l'estragon - which translates as an egg baked in a dish with crab and tarragon. After my first bite, I was in heaven. All I could think of while savoring this creation was that this recipe would be ideal to serve for brunch or for a special breakfast when we have overnight guests. It was simple, yet sophisticated, and didn't take long to assemble or bake.
NEWS
By Amy Scattergood and Amy Scattergood,Los Angeles Times | May 13, 2007
The sun moves over the Saturday Pico farmers' market in Santa Monica, Calif., filtering through the canopy that protects the delicate herbs and baby lettuces at the Kenter Canyon Farms stall. The salad of market lettuces that we take for granted on the menu these days, an edible bouquet that tastes as good as it looks, effectively began in owner Andrea Crawford's garden. To be more accurate, Alice Waters' garden. Twenty-six years ago, Crawford began growing lettuces and herbs for Chez Panisse, literally in Waters' backyard.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | February 10, 2007
Whenever I am invited to a potluck, I instinctively offer to make dessert, but recently, when a good friend mentioned that she'd like to have us over for such a supper, I volunteered to bring a vegetable. I did this because I was anxious to try a new dish one of my enthusiastic assistants had developed. The recipe was for a sweet potato gratin, which had been fashioned after a similar dish I had created using Yukon Gold potatoes and creme fraiche. My talented helper, Emily Bell, had replaced the white spuds with sweet potatoes, and used rosemary in place of thyme as a seasoning.
NEWS
By Betty Hallock and Betty Hallock,Los Angeles Times | January 7, 2007
Parsnip and celery root are layered with nutmeg-laced cream and two kinds of cheese for this luscious gratin created by Ari Rosenson, chef de cuisine of Cut in Los Angeles. This recipe calls for a 9-inch gratin dish or deep-dish pie plate. Betty Hallock writes for the Los Angeles Times, which provided the recipe analysis. CELERY ROOT AND PARSNIP GRATIN Serves 8 1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon finely chopped shallots 1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons heavy cream 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon milk 2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon finely ground black pepper 1 pinch nutmeg 2 large celery roots (about 2 1/2 pounds total)
NEWS
By JENN GARBEE and JENN GARBEE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 30, 2006
It's hard to imagine French home cooking without a dollop of creme fraiche, that silky, subtly tart cultured cream that has a way of making food taste better. In France, just about every home cook keeps it handy to enrich sauces, dress up cooked vegetables or balance the sweetness of desserts. At A.O.C. in West Hollywood, chef Suzanne Goin mashes fingerling potatoes with butter and Italian parsley, then stirs in a generous dollop of house-made creme fraiche. Luscious, nutty and a little tangy, it's delicious with those earthy potatoes.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 15, 2006
My husband, a quintessential extrovert, never met a stranger, so after several decades of living with him, I'm no longer surprised when he mentions that he's invited friends over for wine and appetizers. He often asks a group of his fellow professors who are working on a project together to meet at our house for drinks, or he'll arrive home from work, announcing that he's met some new people I am certain to like, and that they can stop by for cocktails on such and such a day. He reasons that having guests in for sips and nibbles is not the same as a dinner party, so he can be spontaneous.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 29, 2001
PARIS -- I had hoped to escape the heat and humidity of the season because we are in Paris, where typically much of summer is mild. How wrong I was! This week the temperature soared into the 90s. I noticed that the heat affected what Parisians were eating. What I refer to as the three "S's" seemed to be the dominant theme for menus. La soupe, la salade and le sorbet were the foods of choice. French restaurants don't always include soups as a first course, but during the height of the hot spell I saw more than one soupe glacee or chilled potage suggested as an opener.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 10, 2000
Moms really get stereotyped. When it's Father's Day, Dad gets a choice of steak, lobster or ribs -- robust, delicious, finger-licking foods. But Mom? What is she served on Mother's Day? Delicate little creature that she is, she gets tiny little morsels of food -- a shrimp cocktail, a single chocolate-dipped strawberry. Presumably these offerings reflect the genteel woman's sensitive nature. Nonsense. Women have appetites that are just as robust as those of most men. Moms deserve a satisfying meal on their day. Give up on the cream-cheese-frosted sandwich loaf.
FEATURES
By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | May 13, 2006
On Mother's Days past, our son (assisted by his dad) liked to make breakfast for me. Following much clanging of pots and pans, I would be greeted by a smiling junior chef, proudly holding a tray loaded with breakfast. In those days, our child rarely ventured into the kitchen to cook. Mother's Day was the single exception. But now, a few decades later, he's a parent himself, and more than a little talented when it comes to cooking. In fact, he does most of the meal preparation for his young family, and loves celebrating special occasions with good food.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 29, 2006
Several months ago, while dining at a seafood restaurant in midtown Manhattan, I ordered a first-course crab and avocado salad and was stunned by the simple ingenuity of the dish. Typically, crab salad is mixed with mayonnaise and rarely includes a spicy accent, but this version was bound with creme fraiche and seasoned with cumin. For entertaining, I love traditional recipes that have been reinterpreted with bright new tastes, and this dish certainly falls into that category. Using creme fraiche (the thick French cream that is a cross between heavy cream and sour cream)
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