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By M.S. Mason and M.S. Mason,The Christian Science Monitor | February 7, 1993
When creme brulee is made to perfection, eating it is a little like falling into clouds -- a satin luxury. The twice-cooked and chilled custard is completed with a caramelized ("brulee" means burnt) sugar topping that cracks like glass when you tap it with a spoon. The contrast of cold custard and hot sugar, of silken vs. hard texture, of delicate vs. strong flavor, and of dark vs. light color sets the unpretentious dessert among the classiest, richest, and most delicious.So delicious, in fact, that a well-made creme brulee can make a French pastry chef's reputation.
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | November 1, 2009
What's a nice semi-boneless quail with couscous and roasted shallots doing in a place like this? From what I understand, the new Reserve is a serious upgrade from what was there before. But the upgrade consists of two bars, more flat-screen TVs than you can shake a stick at, some high-top tables, exposed brick walls, really loud music and no fabric to speak of. All that adds up to a typical South Baltimore bar, nicer than some, but not exactly where you expect to find duck confit salad and creme brulee.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | December 26, 2004
The more things change, the more things stay the same. And in 2004, Baltimore's restaurant scene didn't even change that much. For every hip new Blue Sea Grill or Taste that opened this year, it felt like there were three new bars or pubs serving the usual fried calamari, crab dip and quesadillas. You still had to wait two or three weeks to get a prime-time Saturday night reservation at Baltimore's favorite Spanish restaurant, Tio Pepe. This is a quintessential mid-century special-occasion establishment, with rich food in huge portions.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 20, 2009
My mouth waters for traditional Baltimore summer cooking, a commodity that seems to grow more elusive. Then, on a recent trip to Rehoboth Beach, Del., came a revelation: remarkable coleslaw. It was served at a grand Baltimore institution that has moved - Jake's Seafood House, run by the Klemkowski family, who for years seemed to have a corner on good food in Locust Point in South Baltimore. I'm not a seafood eater, so why do I go to Jake's? Because the owners are old-time South Baltimoreans who know how to make coleslaw.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 7, 2000
I've sampled creme brulee in every flavor imaginable. I've tried it scented with lemon grass and also with ginger. I've enjoyed dark chocolate as well as orange perfumed creations and admired pumpkin and also maple syrup versions. And, even though I've savored every bite of these "burnt custards" (as the name is translated), I can't remember one I liked better than the white chocolate creme brulee served at The Square, a well-known London restaurant. Several months ago my husband and I and good friends dined in this French restaurant located in the Mayfair area of England's capital.
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | October 16, 1996
Blowtorch cooking? I don't think so. Turning sizzling bacon with a dinner fork is as much danger as I want in the kitchen.That's why I make creme caramel, rather than its torchy sister, creme brulee. Both desserts are luscious, creamy custards made with generous amounts of milk, cream, eggs and vanilla. Both refresh the palate with a cooling, smooth embrace. Silky and sensual.But creme brulee has a crunchy, caramelized upper crust. And )) to create that brown sugar bonnet, the cook has to sift a layer of brown sugar on the cooked custard and fire it with flames just before serving.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | July 15, 1998
Here's a simple recipe that makes good eating (in six weeks) and great gifts to save for the holidays. Use as a topping over ice cream, pound cake, flan and bread pudding. Add to chocolate cake or brownie batter. Or combine with other fruit in season.Brandied CherriesMakes 1 1/2 quarts2 pounds fresh sweet cherries, pitted2 cups sugar1 quart brandyCombine and mix well. Store in tightly covered jar in cool place for 6 or more weeks. Portion into canning jars for gifts and store in a cool, dark place.
NEWS
By DONNA PIERCE and DONNA PIERCE,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 22, 2006
In England, I was served from a huge dish of creme brulee that was covered with a glassy-smooth, see-through sheet of caramelized sugar. It was smooth as ice. How do you get caramelized sugar to look like a golden ice-skating rink? The smooth caramelized sugar topping you describe is made by using a small kitchen torch. They're sold at most cooking or baking supply stores for $30 to $40. The process for creating a slick, shiny surface with the torch is described in Essentials of Baking, from Williams-Sonoma.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | August 6, 1997
Sweet potatoes from the SouthThis unusual and delicious recipe for sweet potatoes is adapted from "The New Southern Cook" by John Martin Taylor (Bantam, $16.95). Serve with roast lamb or chicken:Sweet potatoes4 small sweet potatoes3 tablespoons fresh, grated horseradish1 cup heavy creamSlice peeled sweet potatoes 1/4 -inch thick. Toss with other ingredients and bake, covered with foil, at 400 degrees for 30-45 minutes until just tender.Must havesWilliams-Sonoma has outdone itself with food-related gadgetry in its current catalog.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1999
Ruth's Chris Steak House has the potential to offer a perfect dining experience -- wonderful, cozy ambience, excellent service and great food.However, our recent visit was egregiously flawed. In an establishment with the word "steak" in its name, half of my filet mignon was too well-done.And at a restaurant with prices like those of Ruth's Chris, perfection is not just something you hope for. You demand it.My boyfriend and I called the restaurant at 8 p.m. on a Friday and were told that the earliest we could be seated was 9.The restaurant is partitioned into cozy dining alcoves, and we were seated in one, but unfortunately for us, it was in a busy spot next to a door.
NEWS
By DONNA PIERCE and DONNA PIERCE,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 22, 2006
In England, I was served from a huge dish of creme brulee that was covered with a glassy-smooth, see-through sheet of caramelized sugar. It was smooth as ice. How do you get caramelized sugar to look like a golden ice-skating rink? The smooth caramelized sugar topping you describe is made by using a small kitchen torch. They're sold at most cooking or baking supply stores for $30 to $40. The process for creating a slick, shiny surface with the torch is described in Essentials of Baking, from Williams-Sonoma.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | December 26, 2004
The more things change, the more things stay the same. And in 2004, Baltimore's restaurant scene didn't even change that much. For every hip new Blue Sea Grill or Taste that opened this year, it felt like there were three new bars or pubs serving the usual fried calamari, crab dip and quesadillas. You still had to wait two or three weeks to get a prime-time Saturday night reservation at Baltimore's favorite Spanish restaurant, Tio Pepe. This is a quintessential mid-century special-occasion establishment, with rich food in huge portions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 2003
Restaurateur Qayum Karzai has had the Midas touch when it comes to Baltimore restaurants. First, there was the Helmand, the North Charles Street restaurant that features the cuisine of his native Afghanistan. Then came Tapas Teatro, which specializes in Spanish "little plates" and has given new life to the area around the Charles Theatre. Both eateries have been wildly successful. So, will the magic continue at Karzai's restaurant No. 3? You can see for yourself, starting next week, when b opens at 1501 Bolton St. If everything goes as planned, Karzai and wife Patricia will open the doors Tuesday to what they describe as a "neighborhood bistro."
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | March 13, 2003
Tim "Tank" Holland and Tom Szewczyk were just a couple of regular Joes from Dundalk until forced to deal with the awesome burden of celebrity. Now friends and neighbors stop and ask when the two will get their own cooking show on TV. Now when they walk into the bar at the Battle Grove Democratic Club, where they're long-time members, a cry goes up from the regulars like the one that greeted Norm when he strolled into Cheers. All of this stems from their coming appearance on the Food Network, on a new show called Food Fight that pits two-person teams in cook-offs against one another.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2002
I RAN INTO my cousin, Katie O'Hare, the granddaughter of my great-Aunt Cora, at the corner of 32nd and Barclay streets bright and early one Saturday not long ago. She was buying her half-gallon of South Mountain Creamery milk imported to Baltimore from Middletown in Frederick County. We then launched into a discussion of our family's mania for cream-rich dairy products - and the lengths we would go to satisfy our tastes for butterfat. Katie recalled the early morning hours with her father, my cousin Billy-O, drinking their cream and munching on a fresh-baked cruller.
NEWS
By Nicholas Boer and Nicholas Boer,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | February 25, 2001
Pudding had its day, flan came and went, but don't mess with brulee. It's here to stay. So let's bring it home. First off, you don't need a blowtorch. But it does add to the thrill and mystery. Like hand-blown glass, creme brulee is clearly elegant -- and remarkably fragile for being created from a hot blue flame. There is a difference, however. Whereas a work of glass may take years of practice, a perfect creme brulee can be had on the very first try. I've made thousands of brulees in many guises since my first batch, but they all start with a simple recipe I learned in an elegant French restaurant on a resort in Kauai.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 11, 1991
It has been Mobtown and Crabtown and Charm City. And, for a while, Baltimore was Nickel City. This was early in the 20th century, when a nickel actually bought something: a sandwich, a beer, a taxi dance or a trolley ride. When the buffalo nickel was introduced in 1913, Baltimoreans used more of them than anyone else in the country.This history lesson comes courtesy of the new Nickel City Grill in Harborplace. The owner and chef are Sunbelters, but their place pays tribute to our town's history; the deco design, which uses lots of dark wood and features sleek booths that resemble railroad dining cars, recalls Baltimore's former reputation as an industrial and transportation center, and the menu updates the region's famed seafood, chicken and ribs.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | November 1, 2009
What's a nice semi-boneless quail with couscous and roasted shallots doing in a place like this? From what I understand, the new Reserve is a serious upgrade from what was there before. But the upgrade consists of two bars, more flat-screen TVs than you can shake a stick at, some high-top tables, exposed brick walls, really loud music and no fabric to speak of. All that adds up to a typical South Baltimore bar, nicer than some, but not exactly where you expect to find duck confit salad and creme brulee.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 7, 2000
I've sampled creme brulee in every flavor imaginable. I've tried it scented with lemon grass and also with ginger. I've enjoyed dark chocolate as well as orange perfumed creations and admired pumpkin and also maple syrup versions. And, even though I've savored every bite of these "burnt custards" (as the name is translated), I can't remember one I liked better than the white chocolate creme brulee served at The Square, a well-known London restaurant. Several months ago my husband and I and good friends dined in this French restaurant located in the Mayfair area of England's capital.
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