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Credits

NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Baltimore officials plan to offer up to $5,000 in tax credits to homeowners who move to new homes but choose to remain in the city. The Resident Retention Tax Credits - which will be introduced before the City Council Monday - are intended to help residents who lose their Homestead tax credits when they switch homes. “This has the potential to be a very effective tool in retaining families and contributing to my goal of growing Baltimore by 10,000 families over the next decade,” Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.  The program was pushed at the state level by Del. Maggie McIntosh, a Baltimore Democrat.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Developers are set to receive tax credits designed to spur the construction of new apartments and homes in Baltimore under legislation the City Council approved Monday. The tax credits, which received no opposition from the council, are part of a plan by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to keep families in Baltimore and attract new residents to the city. "We look at different trends in the market that help us to determine what credits might put the city in the best position to be competitive," said Kevin R. Harris, a spokesman for Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
City officials want to hire their own assessors to determine the size of historic tax credits in response to errors blamed on the state that left some property owners with wildly inaccurate bills. The proposal is the latest step by the Rawlings-Blake administration to resolve problems in the calculation of the tax credits for improvement to historic properties. The calculations were sometimes wrong, and some property owners wound up owing thousands of dollars more in taxes than they anticipated.
NEWS
May 31, 2014
The opening of the Edgar Allan Poe House at 30 Amity Street was a small milestone in preserving important historical realities of Baltimore City. This opening also represented a significant achievement by a small number of citizens who realized that cooperative nonprofit action can serve a constructive purpose. It is interesting to note that the French sociologist Alexis de Tocqueville, in his work "Democracy in America," in the 1830s noted that Americans "are forever forming associations.
NEWS
May 19, 2014
In 2006, when the electric industry was a hot topic in the Maryland governor's race, the issue was BGE rates, with the Democratic candidate, Martin O'Malley, promising more consumer-friendly regulators who would seek to roll back a 72 percent increase. Eight years later, another Democratic candidate, Del. Heather Mizeur, is seeking to make the electric industry part of the governor's race and is again promising more consumer-friendly regulators. But the issue this time is reliability.
NEWS
May 16, 2014
We, members of the Marijuana Policy Coalition of Maryland, write in response to the editorial, "Spin control," that appeared on May 8. Our coalition is non-partisan and does not endorse candidates. We take no position on the Maryland gubernatorial race. The purpose of this letter is to set the record straight. Our coalition promotes honest, fact-based dialogue regarding marijuana use and the impact of its criminalization and advocates for the safe, effective, efficient regulation and taxation of the sale of marijuana in Maryland for adults.
NEWS
May 13, 2014
How's this for a solution to the plastic bag problem that would not penalize poor people ( "Bag the bag tax," May 12)? As a community service, supermarkets could give a 5-cent credit on their bill to anyone who brought and used reusable bags for their purchases, as some stores already do. This would mean that those who were not bothered about a 5-cent fee and continued to use plastic bags would subsidize those who were affected by the cost....
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
The state has started a new tax credit program designed to help make home ownership more affordable for working families, Housing and Community Development Secretary Raymond A. Skinner said Thursday. The Maryland HomeCredit program allows eligible buyers to claim a federal tax credit worth 25 percent of interest paid on a mortgage -- up to $2,000 annually -- for the life of a loan, as long as the property remains a primary residence.   To qualify, a buyer's income and the price of the property must fall below certain limits, which vary by location.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
Property owners could be able to apply for most city tax credits through an online system by the end of the year, a set-up designed to improve the accuracy of a process that has been troubled by errors, officials said Friday. The online system went live Friday for developers of large apartment buildings, said William Voorhees, the city's director of revenue and tax analysis. He said he expects it to open to applications for the historic properties tax credit this summer and most others by the end of the year.
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