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NEWS
December 16, 2013
Research: Paul McCardell Production: Steve Sullivan, Molly Geary, Brianna Hamilton, Dan Rodricks Video: Christopher T. Assaf, Kevin Richardson Graphics: Leeann Adams Interactive design: Adam Marton, Dana Amihere, Greg Kohn Photography: Barbara Haddock Taylor Special thanks to: Dr. Glenn T. Johnson and the student researchers from the Stevenson University Public History Program (Lindsay McCrea, Tori Woodard, Alexandra Jeffries): WYPR FM; The Cutting Corp.; Jo Ann Babcock; Rebecca Boykin; Stan Heuisler; Steven Ijams; Charles Irwin; Kevin Irwin; Charlie Ives; Larry Ives; Lee Kennedy; Mac Kennedy; Tom O'Neill, Jr.; Mike Pierce; Bonnie Willen Pogach; Debra Smigel; Roslyn Willen Steinhorn; Bud Thomas; Sarah Sadler Woods.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake says she is throwing her support behind City Councilman William "Pete" Welch's bill calling for a large tax break for urban farmers in Baltimore. In legislation pending in a City Council committee, Welch is seeking a 90 percent break on property taxes for urban farmers who grow and sell at least $5,000 of fruit and vegetables a year. The credits, which must be approved by the city's Cffice of Sustainability, are good for five years, but can be renewed for a total of 10 years, according to the bill.
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NEWS
July 5, 2013
In a year when the city is claiming that property tax rates have been reduced, the reduction that many property owners are enjoying is in historic tax credits based on expensive capital property improvements. This weekend, approximately 1,500 cards from the city Department of Finance arrived with first-class postage across the city notifying recipients of "some changes in the Historic Tax Credit (CHAP Credit) given by Baltimore City for qualifying properties. " The upshot of the "changes" is that the "credit has been reduced from the prior year due to an incorrect calculation.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | September 28, 2014
This weekend over 700 people were scheduled to attend our 6th annual Archdiocese of Baltimore Gala to raise money for students who otherwise could not afford to attend a Catholic school in the Archdiocese. Since its inception, the gala has raised more than $4.2 million in tuition assistance and endowment for Catholic schools. The gala is just one way the archdiocese is helping children from low-income families benefit from a Catholic school education. Another is the Partners in Excellence (PIE)
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
A tentative deal was reached Thursday in Annapolis to increase tax credits for film and television productions shot in Maryland, in a bid to keep popular TV series like "House of Cards" and "Veep" from abandoning the state. A joint conference committee on the budget agreed to provide up to $18.5 million in film tax credits, significantly more than the $7.5 million that Gov. Martin O'Malley had originally proposed. Media Rights Capital, the California company producing the Netflix series "House of Cards," warned state officials by letter that it was putting off work on the show's third season until it could be assured that sufficient tax credits would be approved.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Four Maryland organizations won the right to raise $135 million for community development projects by selling federal tax credits, the Treasury Department said Wednesday. The New Markets tax credits help developers fund projects intended to add jobs and bring other improvements to distressed areas. Investors purchasing the credits from New Markets recipients receive a break on their federal income taxes. The local recipients are Baltimore-based CDF Development, a Cordish Cos. affiliate that intends to invest in retail and mixed-use projects; Baltimore-based Harbor Bankshares Corp., which will offer below-market-rate loans to projects in low-income neighborhoods; Columbia-based ESIC New Markets Partners, which focuses on health care centers, healthy-food options and mixed-use developments; and Bethesda-based Mid-City Community CDE, whose investments will include transit-oriented businesses.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
Lawmakers approved $25 million in tax credits for the film industry Tuesday, expanding and extending a program that was set to expire in 2014. Tuesday's vote sends to Gov. Martin O'Malley a bill that increases subsidies to film companies by $17.5 million over this year. O'Malley proposed the increased tax credit, along with credits for biotechnology and cyber security industries. Since the credits were first approved in 2011, they have gone to several projects including the popular Netflix series "House of Cards" that stars Kevin Spacey and was filmed in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
The state's biotech tax credits drew more than 180 applications within three minutes of the window opening for the $8 million available this fiscal year, the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development said Thursday. The credits go to investors pumping money into fledgling Maryland biotechnology firms in need of capital. The credits will be handed out on a first-come, first-served basis to those that qualify — thus the rush. Initial credit certifications will be issued within 30 calendar days, DBED said.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | February 8, 2013
Because of the delay by Congress to address last year's expiring tax cuts, the IRS has had less time to update its forms and systems. That's postponed the start of the tax season until Jan. 30 for everyone. But some filers have had to wait even longer because the IRS still hasn't updated all the forms. Starting Sunday, the IRS is ready to being processing returns that include Form 4562 for depreciation and amortization. And on Feb. 14 th , it will begin handling returns using Form 8863 to claim education credits.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2012
The ink was barely dry on Baltimore City's new property tax bills when we spotted fresh errors in the way some historic tax credits were recently calculated. If this sounds familiar, it should. On June 24 The Sun published the results of an investigation that found the city has failed to collect millions of dollars in potential revenue because of chronic errors and miscalculations in the historic credit program, which offers tax breaks for historic renovations. With a new tax year starting July 1, we checked to see if the problems had been fixed on recently mailed bills.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Ravens coach John Harbaugh praised the late-game adjustments on defense in Sunday's 23-21 win over Cleveland that kept the Browns off the scoreboard in the final quarter and gave the offense the chance to complete its comeback. "That's what won the game, the resolve of our guys to finish the game - probably spearheaded by our defense in terms of the three-and-outs," Harbaugh said. "I think we had three out of four three-and-outs at the end, and two in a row in the fourth quarter.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The City Council gave final approval Monday to a plan to offer up to $5,000 in tax credits to homeowners who move to new homes but choose to remain in the city. The Resident Retention Tax Credits - which will were approved unanimously by the council - are intended to help residents who lose their Homestead tax credits when they switch homes. The program was pushed at the state level by Del. Maggie McIntosh, a Baltimore Democrat. Her bill allowed city homeowners to transfer a portion of the Homestead tax credit from their old building to a new property.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
When Guy W. Willey Sr. was growing up, he hunted and ate Delmarva fox squirrels in the low-lying forests of the Eastern Shore, long before it was clear the giant cousins of the common gray squirrel were in danger of disappearing. He was "dirt poor," he recalled, and lots of folks did it back then. Now, at 83, he's been invited to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge on Friday, when federal officials are expected to announce the squirrel has bounced back from the brink of extinction and is no longer in need of legal protection.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
R. Alonzo "Lonz" Childress, a civil engineer whose career with the Baltimore County Department of Public Works spanned more than 40 years, died Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of complications from an infection. The Taneytown resident was 72. "Lonz was one of the most pragmatic and even-keeled persons that you'd ever meet. He was good at getting to the bottom of problems," said Brian L. Childress, a nephew who is a civil engineer with D.S. Thaler & Associates. "He always maintained a steady course and never got worked up. He could solve engineering problems without ever getting out of sync," said Mr. Childress, who lives in Perry Hall.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | August 14, 2014
If you had a complaint about your credit card last year, about billing or fraud, for instance, you were more likely to live in Maryland than North Dakota. Mid-Atlantic residents had the most credit card complaints per capita, with Maryland ranked overall in the U.S. as the state with the third highest number of complaints, according to a new study. Consumer website ValuePenguin analyzed the more than 13,000 complaints collected by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in 2013 to come up with its findings.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Customers who dined at P.F. Chang's China Bistro at the Inner Harbor during two months this spring may be victims of debit and credit card data theft, the Scottsdale-based chain warned Monday in an announcement of a widespread security breach at 33 U.S. locations. PF. Chang's was alerted to a possible breach on June 10 by the U.S. Secret Service and launched a still-ongoing investigation. The company said it had the problem contained by the next day and has been processing credit and debit cards securely since June 11. Chang's said its card processing system was breached.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
More than 100 applicants are vying for $12 million worth of Maryland tax credits available to biotechnology investors in fiscal 2015, state economic development officials said. Applications for the Biotechnology Investment Incentive Tax Credit program were submitted online Tuesday to the state Department of Business and Economic Development. The program, first funded in fiscal 2007, has spurred investment of more than $120 million in 70 biotech firms, state officials said. Some Baltimore area companies that received investments last year include American Gene Technologies International, Animalgesic Laboratories, Cerecor Inc., Clear Guide Medical and Diagnostic Biochips.
NEWS
August 7, 2013
Do you think it is possible that your editorial writers will ever get it through their seemingly impenetrable skulls that neither the state nor the city nor - heaven forbid - miscalculating bureaucrats ever pay for their mistakes? Taxpayers do. It is one thing to say that homeowners who benefited from miscalculated historic property tax credits should not be billed for past miscalculations, and that taxpayers should not bear the cost of those mistakes ( "Doing what's fair on the historic tax credit," Aug. 5)
NEWS
August 4, 2014
Harried commuters will be gratified by the Maryland Public Service Commission's decision last week to require taxicabs operating in Baltimore City to install credit card-reading devices in the back seat where passengers sit. The new rule, which goes into effect at the end of the year, will allow customers to just swipe a Mastercard or Visa to pay the fare rather than having to carry cash. It's a convenience riders in other cities have long enjoyed, and it has probably taken a lot of the anxiety out of hailing a cab. It's about time Baltimore caught up with the trend.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
John W. Dorsey, former chancellor of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County who later returned to the classroom where he taught economics, died Monday of respiratory failure at his Laurel home. He was 78. "Many believe that he saved UMBC from several alternative fates, from absorption to closure, and set it onto the sound course that leads to today," said Joseph N. Tatarewicz, an associate professor of history at UMBC and director of the university's human context of science and technology program.
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