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NEWS
October 2, 2005
The Savage branch library, 9525 Durness Lane, will sponsor a program on credit repair, including tips from experts at the Small Business Administration on how to improve credit scores. The program, part of the series "Libraries Mean Business," will be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The series highlights ways the library serves county businesses. The library will sponsor a meeting of its Mystery Book Club at 7 p.m. Oct. 12 to discuss The Talisman, by Stephen King and Peter Straub. The library's Third Wednesday Book Club will meet at 7 p.m. Oct. 19 to discuss Searching for Yellowstone by Paul Scullery.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | July 30, 2014
Do-not-call violations and telemarketing abuses ranked as the fastest-growing consumer complaints last year, according to a report released Wednesday. Three Maryland agencies participated in the annual survey by the Consumer Federation of America and the North American Consumer Protection Investigators. The survey compiled the top, worst and fastest-growing complaints. The Howard County Office of Consumer Affairs, the Maryland Attorney General's Office and the Montgomery County Office of Consumer Protection were among 43 agencies from 23 states that responded.
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BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE and EILEEN AMBROSE,eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | December 4, 2008
Tough economic times might push even more desperate consumers into the hands of unscrupulous credit repair firms. That worries Maryland regulators, who are stepping up oversight of credit repair groups. "We have to stay ahead of the problems," says Sarah Bloom Raskin, Maryland's commissioner of financial regulation. Her office has launched a campaign dubbed "Operation Repair," which includes making sure individuals and companies offering credit repair to Marylanders are licensed as required.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE and EILEEN AMBROSE,eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | December 4, 2008
Tough economic times might push even more desperate consumers into the hands of unscrupulous credit repair firms. That worries Maryland regulators, who are stepping up oversight of credit repair groups. "We have to stay ahead of the problems," says Sarah Bloom Raskin, Maryland's commissioner of financial regulation. Her office has launched a campaign dubbed "Operation Repair," which includes making sure individuals and companies offering credit repair to Marylanders are licensed as required.
BUSINESS
By KEN HARNEY | November 2, 2008
With foreclosures, short sales and credit card defaults at record levels, an aggressive breed of firms has sprung up offering to power-wash consumers' damaged credit files and boost credit scores, thereby eliminating records of bankruptcies and mortgage delinquencies, even when the information is accurate. Such services - promoted on the Internet and in radio ads - are attractive to people who want to buy a house but whose credit scores are too low for a mortgage through the Federal Housing Administration, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. The problem with these companies, say federal and state authorities, is that their promises may be deceptive and illegal.
BUSINESS
By KEN HARNEY | June 8, 2008
Picture this: You're eager to take advantage of today's troubled real estate market and buy a foreclosed house at a fire-sale price. The problem is you don't have much money for a down payment. And your credit files are scuffed up with late payments. What you need is a service that can help put it all together for you -- linking you into lists of available foreclosures, credit repair, and even low-down-payment mortgage financing. Companies that promise to do at least some of these things -- especially to fix your credit -- ply their wares aggressively on the Internet.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | August 5, 2008
Fair Isaac Corp. is revising the formula for its widely used FICO credit score for the second time in a year. This time, the company seems to have gotten it right. Last week, the company said it would restore "authorized user accounts" when it calculates the FICO credit score. That's a reversal of a year ago. "Two thumbs up," John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education for Credit.com, says of this latest development. Lenders use credit scores to determine whether to extend credit to you and under what terms.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1994
* Coldwell Banker Grempler Realty Inc. reported Elaine Northrop of the Ellicott City/Howard County office has been named top producer among the 50,000 Coldwell Banker sales associates throughout the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico for the third straight year with a record $31 million in sales. Ms. Northrop had $27 million in sales in 1992 and $20 million in 1991.* Credit Repair & Financial Services of Baltimore announced the appointment of its president, Natalie Love, as chairman of The National Urban League and NationsBank Community Loan Review Board and Comprehensive Credit Counseling Project.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The postcards promise cash prizes, free vacations and expensive cars, and they begin by trumpeting the good news: "Congratulations, You are a Guaranteed Winner!"Better not believe it, say federal investigators and consumer advocates who sounded a warning yesterday about an increasing flood of fraudulent get-rich postcard schemes."The postcard is now the calling card of more and more con artists" who are defrauding the elderly, the poor and others by the millions, said Linda Golodner, president of the National Consumers League, a Washington advocacy group.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1993
* United Parcel Service has unveiled a new graphic for display on the side of its familiar fleet of 64,000 chocolate-brown vehicles. The new logo, a two-tone globe labeled with: "Worldwide Delivery Service" and the firm's 800 telephone number, depicts the global reach and service accessibility of now worldwide "small package" ground and air freight carrier.* Lucas Brothers, the Baltimore-based national office supply and furnishings distributor, has changed its corporate name to Lucas Inc. and becomes holding company for Lucas Corporate Interiors and Lucas Corporate Stationers.
BUSINESS
By KEN HARNEY | November 2, 2008
With foreclosures, short sales and credit card defaults at record levels, an aggressive breed of firms has sprung up offering to power-wash consumers' damaged credit files and boost credit scores, thereby eliminating records of bankruptcies and mortgage delinquencies, even when the information is accurate. Such services - promoted on the Internet and in radio ads - are attractive to people who want to buy a house but whose credit scores are too low for a mortgage through the Federal Housing Administration, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. The problem with these companies, say federal and state authorities, is that their promises may be deceptive and illegal.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | August 5, 2008
Fair Isaac Corp. is revising the formula for its widely used FICO credit score for the second time in a year. This time, the company seems to have gotten it right. Last week, the company said it would restore "authorized user accounts" when it calculates the FICO credit score. That's a reversal of a year ago. "Two thumbs up," John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education for Credit.com, says of this latest development. Lenders use credit scores to determine whether to extend credit to you and under what terms.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,The Morning Call | July 6, 2008
If you can improve your credit scores, you will probably spend less money, perhaps hundreds or thousands of dollars less each year. Here is how to raise your scores, so you can receive the best financing rates and deals, better rates on insurance and all the other benefits of having a high credit rating. *What's a good score? You have many credit scores. By far the most important are your FICO scores with each of the three major credit bureaus, Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. A mediocre score is 700, while a score above 750 should get you all the best deals and borrowing rates, said John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education for Credit.
BUSINESS
By KEN HARNEY | June 8, 2008
Picture this: You're eager to take advantage of today's troubled real estate market and buy a foreclosed house at a fire-sale price. The problem is you don't have much money for a down payment. And your credit files are scuffed up with late payments. What you need is a service that can help put it all together for you -- linking you into lists of available foreclosures, credit repair, and even low-down-payment mortgage financing. Companies that promise to do at least some of these things -- especially to fix your credit -- ply their wares aggressively on the Internet.
BUSINESS
By ILYCE GLINK | January 11, 2008
Every day, thousands of people type the words "credit repair" into an Internet search engine. Thousands more type in phrases like "bad credit" or "bad credit repair." Figuring out how to repair your credit is on the minds of homebuyers, sellers and owners, each of whom has realized that having stellar credit gives you financial options that simply aren't available to those with low credit scores. Unfortunately, some of the Web sites that come up in a search for "credit repair" can do more harm than good.
NEWS
October 2, 2005
The Savage branch library, 9525 Durness Lane, will sponsor a program on credit repair, including tips from experts at the Small Business Administration on how to improve credit scores. The program, part of the series "Libraries Mean Business," will be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The series highlights ways the library serves county businesses. The library will sponsor a meeting of its Mystery Book Club at 7 p.m. Oct. 12 to discuss The Talisman, by Stephen King and Peter Straub. The library's Third Wednesday Book Club will meet at 7 p.m. Oct. 19 to discuss Searching for Yellowstone by Paul Scullery.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,The Morning Call | July 6, 2008
If you can improve your credit scores, you will probably spend less money, perhaps hundreds or thousands of dollars less each year. Here is how to raise your scores, so you can receive the best financing rates and deals, better rates on insurance and all the other benefits of having a high credit rating. *What's a good score? You have many credit scores. By far the most important are your FICO scores with each of the three major credit bureaus, Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. A mediocre score is 700, while a score above 750 should get you all the best deals and borrowing rates, said John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education for Credit.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | July 30, 2014
Do-not-call violations and telemarketing abuses ranked as the fastest-growing consumer complaints last year, according to a report released Wednesday. Three Maryland agencies participated in the annual survey by the Consumer Federation of America and the North American Consumer Protection Investigators. The survey compiled the top, worst and fastest-growing complaints. The Howard County Office of Consumer Affairs, the Maryland Attorney General's Office and the Montgomery County Office of Consumer Protection were among 43 agencies from 23 states that responded.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | April 18, 1999
FOR THOSE buying homes and refinancing mortgages who are struggling with credit demons, a new program could be a godsend: the widespread adoption of a new, rewards-for-good- performance approach by mortgage lenders across the nation.Advocated last month by one of the federal government's top financial regulators, the plan is in effect at the nation's second-largest mortgage company and is under active development at the largest.The idea works like this: Even if you're having trouble with managing credit -- your credit cards are at their limit, you've fallen behind on car payments and other monthly debts -- there should be a form of home mortgage loan that provides you an incentive to straighten out your finances.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1994
* Coldwell Banker Grempler Realty Inc. reported Elaine Northrop of the Ellicott City/Howard County office has been named top producer among the 50,000 Coldwell Banker sales associates throughout the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico for the third straight year with a record $31 million in sales. Ms. Northrop had $27 million in sales in 1992 and $20 million in 1991.* Credit Repair & Financial Services of Baltimore announced the appointment of its president, Natalie Love, as chairman of The National Urban League and NationsBank Community Loan Review Board and Comprehensive Credit Counseling Project.
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