Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCredit Bureau
IN THE NEWS

Credit Bureau

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 26, 1991
Services for Angelina P. Forsythe, a retired secretary for the TRW Credit Bureau, will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at the Leroy M. and Russell C. Witzke Funeral Home, 1630 Edmondson Ave., Catonsville.Mrs. Forsythe, who was 63 and lived on Barrett Road in Woodlawn, died of cancer Wednesday at the Caton Manor Nursing Center in Catonsville.An employee of the credit bureau for almost 10 years before her retirement in 1988, she earlier did temporary office work through Kelly Services.The former Angelina Patrinicola was a native of Baltimore who was educated in the public schools and at the Strayer Business College.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Edward Joseph "Ned" McNeal Sr., who served in the General Assembly and who later headed the Credit Bureau of Baltimore, died at Sinai Hospital on Wednesday after suffering a fall at his home. The Timonium resident was 86. Born in Baltimore and raised on Cresmont Avenue, he was a 1945 graduate of Loyola High School. He then served in the Navy aboard the Absecon, a tender. He earned degrees at what is now Loyola University Maryland and the University of Baltimore School of Law. Mr. McNeal represented Northeast Baltimore in the House of Delegates from 1955 to 1963.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 8, 1991
A memorial service for Jane Kimberling Flanders, retired comptroller for the United Credit Bureau of America, will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens on Padonia Road.Mrs. Flanders died Tuesday at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center after a lengthy illness with muscular dystrophy. She was 68 and had livedfor 22 years in the 6000 block of Bellona Avenue.Born and educated in Marion, Va., she was married in 1943 to Charles H. Flanders, now of Austin, Texas, from whom she was divorced in 1952.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | July 17, 2013
Today is Military Consumer Protection Day - the start of a year-long campaign by federal agencies to help service members and their families handle their finances and protect against con artists and identity thieves. According to the Federal Trade Commission, members of the military are ripe for attacks by scam artists. “They are targets for fraud because they relocate frequently, and many are living on their own and earning a steady paycheck for the first time,” said Jessica Rich, FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection Director, in a news release.
FEATURES
By SUSAN BONDY and SUSAN BONDY,Creators Syndicate | July 2, 1995
Q: Two years ago, at my divorce trial, the judge declared that the credit-card bills my wife ran up (in both our names) were her responsibility.One year ago, when I got turned down for new credit, I was told the reason was large unpaid credit-card bills. I requested a copy of my credit report from the local credit bureau, and not only were those old bills unpaid, but more liabilities had been incurred since then.I sent the credit bureau a copy of the judge's decree and asked that they correct their records.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 28, 2000
I'm trying to help a friend who recently was turned down for a loan from a local bank. When we got her credit report from Experian, it showed an unpaid balance of $2,600 on one of her credit cards. She showed me a 1099C tax form, issued by the credit card company in 1995, showing that the entire amount had been canceled. Why is it still showing up on her credit report? This gross error cost her a much-needed loan. We've asked the credit bureau to investigate, but the telephone representative said it would take 30 days.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Edward Joseph "Ned" McNeal Sr., who served in the General Assembly and who later headed the Credit Bureau of Baltimore, died at Sinai Hospital on Wednesday after suffering a fall at his home. The Timonium resident was 86. Born in Baltimore and raised on Cresmont Avenue, he was a 1945 graduate of Loyola High School. He then served in the Navy aboard the Absecon, a tender. He earned degrees at what is now Loyola University Maryland and the University of Baltimore School of Law. Mr. McNeal represented Northeast Baltimore in the House of Delegates from 1955 to 1963.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1993
VW to cut 30,000 jobsEurope's biggest carmaker, Volkswagen AG, is planning to cut 30,000 jobs worldwide by the end of 1994 as a declining domestic market and falling exports bite into profits, industry sources said yesterday.Sales of savings bonds a recordThe Treasury Department sold $17.7 billion in U.S. savings bonds in 1992, breaking a 48-year-old record set during World War II. The latest annual sales total compares with $12.4 billion sold in 1944, the old record, and roughly $9.5 billion in 1991.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue | November 28, 2004
As Marylanders are already able to do, others across the United States can soon get a free copy of their credit reports -- a year after the government promised to make them available at no charge. The free access is the result of longtime lobbying to reform the credit-reporting system to help consumers better protect themselves against identity theft and give them better methods of ensuring an accurate credit history. Until now, you could get a free report -- a log of your credit history -- only under specific circumstances, such as being denied credit in the past 60 days.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1993
Fed disinclined to boost ratesFederal Reserve officials last month shifted their monetary policy away from a bias toward raising interest rates, according to meeting minutes.All members of the Federal Open Market Committee at the Aug. 17 meeting "agreed that recent developments pointed to the desirability of a steady policy course" because of the absence of inflation pressures and the restraining effect of budget deficit reduction, according to the minutes released yesterday.Credit bureau can't sell namesA major credit bureau was barred yesterday from selling lists of thousands of consumers to telemarketers and direct-mail advertisers based on federally protected information in its files.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2012
Personal finance guru Suze Orman says she never would have introduced her prepaid debit card if there wasn't a possibility that some day it could be used in credit scoring. Orman launched the Approved Card this month. She has partnered with TransUnion, one of the three major credit bureaus, in a pilot program to see whether spending activity on the prepaid card could be used to develop a credit score. Some credit experts are doubtful. People load money on a prepaid card that can be used at places that accept plastic.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue | November 28, 2004
As Marylanders are already able to do, others across the United States can soon get a free copy of their credit reports -- a year after the government promised to make them available at no charge. The free access is the result of longtime lobbying to reform the credit-reporting system to help consumers better protect themselves against identity theft and give them better methods of ensuring an accurate credit history. Until now, you could get a free report -- a log of your credit history -- only under specific circumstances, such as being denied credit in the past 60 days.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | June 15, 2003
WHEN YOU discovered an error on your credit report in connection with a mortgage application, was it easy to get it corrected? Or did you, like Rep. Gary L. Ackerman, the New York Democrat, get a multimonth runaround from both the creditor who made the mistake and the credit bureau that failed to promptly amend your credit file? Ackerman's complaint was just one of dozens that that surfaced last week in Capitol Hill hearings that have huge potential significance to anyone who applies for a home loan.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 23, 2001
My wife is 30 and I am 34. We have decent jobs, and our combined income is about $125,000 a year. We have been living well below our means, and have enough money to completely pay off our mortgage. Many advisers have told us not to do it for one reason or another. Most have said that as our mortgage rate is only 6 percent, we should invest the money instead. But my wife and I feel that with jobs being lost every day, it would be smart to just bite the bullet and pay off the mortgage. As a bonus, we'll save on the interest we otherwise would have paid.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 5, 2001
Now that consumers are able to view their own credit scores, I requested mine, confident that it would be at the higher end of the scale. I was shocked to learn that at 671 mine was considered "below average." The greatest negative, 40 points, was due to a collection matter that took place a number of years ago against my husband. It was a business debt, not a personal debt, but that's not how it was reported. After learning my score, I sent a letter to the creditor's collection attorney trying to enlist his help in removing this from our credit report, but I never heard from him. You expected rather a lot from an attorney hired by your husband's creditor.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,Washington Post Writers Group | July 2, 2000
One minute they're stonewalling, the next minute they're begging you to listen. I'm speaking of the companies that create consumer credit scores. Right now, you probably don't know your personal credit score, and the industry hasn't wanted to tell you. Within a year, however, they'll be falling all over themselves to disclose. The knowledge should help you handle your money a little better. A credit score tells you how you stack up as a borrower, compared with the rest of the population.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 23, 2001
My wife is 30 and I am 34. We have decent jobs, and our combined income is about $125,000 a year. We have been living well below our means, and have enough money to completely pay off our mortgage. Many advisers have told us not to do it for one reason or another. Most have said that as our mortgage rate is only 6 percent, we should invest the money instead. But my wife and I feel that with jobs being lost every day, it would be smart to just bite the bullet and pay off the mortgage. As a bonus, we'll save on the interest we otherwise would have paid.
FEATURES
By SUSAN BONDY and SUSAN BONDY,Creators Syndicate | June 25, 1995
Q: I am unemployed and have no income of my own. My husband and I were issued VISA cards in each of our own names. All our assets, including our home as well as our savings and checking accounts, are owned jointly. If something were to happen to my husband, would I have a credit history?A: Income and assets have very little to do with a credit history. A credit card, a car loan or a mortgage should show up on your credit history, whereas a checking or savings account and even stocks and bonds probably will not.In order for a joint credit source to appear on a wife's credit history, her name should appear on the loan or credit-card application.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 28, 2000
I'm trying to help a friend who recently was turned down for a loan from a local bank. When we got her credit report from Experian, it showed an unpaid balance of $2,600 on one of her credit cards. She showed me a 1099C tax form, issued by the credit card company in 1995, showing that the entire amount had been canceled. Why is it still showing up on her credit report? This gross error cost her a much-needed loan. We've asked the credit bureau to investigate, but the telephone representative said it would take 30 days.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | November 8, 1998
AS MORTGAGE lenders nationwide increasingly use "credit scoring" to decide what interest rates and fees consumers qualify for, a troubling new trend is emerging: With little or no reliable information, loan applicants are trying to raise their credit scores, often with calamitous results.Take this case involving a California couple -- both highly paid professionals -- who sought to qualify for the lowest interest-rate refinancing available. The key test, according to their mortgage broker, was that they have a "FICO" score of 720 or higher.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.