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NEWS
November 21, 2013
Speeches, slides and introductions at the Horowitz Center on Nov. 18 were long on the five-firm "Dream Team's" credentials as "Unabashed Designers of Delight" [per the Trust's handout] — with slides of buildings, rooftop parks, unusual landscape sculptures and constructions worldwide and accompanied by GMAP (God-Mother-Apple-Pie) aspirations to join people-nature-beauty together. Much of this reminded me of marketing efforts by a lead character in the current Masterpiece Theatre PBS show, "Paradise," as he develops and pitches ideas for a new, all-service department store to meet women's needs in 19th-century London.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Federal prosecutors pursuing a drug money case based in part on a police dog whose certification has been questioned said in court filings this week that the dog might actually have been properly trained. The case stems from the seizure of $122,000 in suspected drug money at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport last fall. An attorney for a woman who claims the money is hers asked a judge to throw out the case, alleging that prosecutors used a faked K-9 training certificate produced by the Maryland Transportation Authority Police to bolster their case.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 27, 2007
Marilee Jones, the dean of admissions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, became well known for urging stressed-out students competing for elite colleges to calm down and stop trying to be perfect. Yesterday, she admitted that she had fabricated her own educational credentials and resigned after nearly three decades at MIT. Officials there said she did not have even an undergraduate degree. Jones said that she would not make any other public comment "at this personally difficult time" and that she hoped her privacy would be respected.
NEWS
Jules Witcover | August 1, 2014
 For more than 60 years with hardly a break, the Republican Partyhas chosen as its standard-bearer someone who has been able to claim it's his turn. Not since military hero Dwight D. Eisenhower defeated Sen. Robert A. Taft of Ohio, whose supporters so contended in 1952, has a conspicuous outsider run away with the prize. Patience nearly always has been rewarded for party stalwarts, whether it was Richard Nixon in 1960, Barry Goldwater in 1964, Nixon again in 1968, Gerald Ford in 1976, Ronald Reagan in 1980, the senior George Bush in 1988, Bob Dole in 1996, the junior George Bushin 2000, John McCain in 2008 or Mitt Romney in 2012.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | October 17, 2005
The people supporting Harriet Miers' Supreme Court nomination, who started out looking defensive, have now proceeded to acquire symptoms of outright desperation. Rather than strain themselves with the impossible task of justifying the appointment, they are now on the attack. The critics, they claim, are opposing Ms. Miers just because she's a woman. In truth, Ms. Miers' gender was one of her two attractions for President Bush - the other being her canine worship of him. But the complaints about her weak credentials would be made even if she had testosterone coming out of her ears.
BUSINESS
By Joyce Lain Kennedy and Joyce Lain Kennedy,Sun Features Inc | June 22, 1992
Dear Joyce: I worked my way up to assistant manager of a well-known bank. But I don't have a college degree, much less an MBA. At 43 and out of work for 14 months, I am beginning to despair of ever cloning my former job. What avenues are open to me? -- W.R.T.Dear W.R.T.: Your predicament warns others of the dramatic changes the American job market is undergoing. In the past, working your way up the career ladder without credentials was always delightful as you rode the employment express.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2001
An American Airlines pilot concerned about the credentials of an Arab-American Secret Service agent on President Bush's security detail ordered the agent off his flight Tuesday night as it prepared to leave Baltimore-Washington International Airport for Texas, an airline official said yesterday. The captain denied passage to the armed agent after reviewing his paperwork and credentials and observing "discrepancies," said Laura Mayo, an airline spokeswoman. The flight eventually took off without the agent.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2000
Federal prosecutors questioned the credentials of Baltimore businessman Allen J. Hoffman yesterday, saying the man who marketed aloe vera as a treatment for everything from cancer to AIDS never earned a grade higher than a C in college science classes and his honorary doctorate degree was a fake. Hoffman, on trial in U.S. District Court on fraud charges related to his aloe business, has testified that he paid $500 to receive a doctor of philosophy degree from the University of Heidelberg.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | January 5, 2007
The nation's truckers undergo federal background checks and must pay for separate licenses to haul materials for the U.S. Defense and Energy departments, to drive across the border and to carry hazardous materials. And come March, if they pick up goods at a seaport, they must obtain another credential that may cost nearly $160, according to rules announced this week. The Transportation Worker Identification Credential, or TWIC, is the government's latest layer of security since the Sept.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1996
Checking whether an attorney is licensed to practice law in Maryland is hardly an arduous task.It can be handled with a phone call to the Court of Appeals, keeper of the official list of bar-admitted attorneys. Or, more simply, by asking the lawyer in question to prove it.But many law firms don't bother with those simple checks when they hire attorneys. And Carolyn Thornlow says it's about time they did."Law firms notoriously are on the trailing edge of sound management practices," says Thornlow, a New York-based management consultant to law firms.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 10, 2014
Gov. Chris Christie, beleaguered back in New Jersey and in the national media over the scandal of contrived traffic jams on the George Washington Bridge, unveiled his strategy for putting his 2016 presidential aspirations back on track the other day before the annual Conservative Political Action Conference. As they say in some unsavory Jersey quarters, he clammed up in the hope of making the problem go away. His earlier claim of having been kept in the dark about the plot to make a Democratic mayor pay for failing to endorse his successful re-election only heightened the political heat on him. So Mr. Christie pivoted to preaching to the choir on his conservative bona fides.
NEWS
November 21, 2013
Speeches, slides and introductions at the Horowitz Center on Nov. 18 were long on the five-firm "Dream Team's" credentials as "Unabashed Designers of Delight" [per the Trust's handout] — with slides of buildings, rooftop parks, unusual landscape sculptures and constructions worldwide and accompanied by GMAP (God-Mother-Apple-Pie) aspirations to join people-nature-beauty together. Much of this reminded me of marketing efforts by a lead character in the current Masterpiece Theatre PBS show, "Paradise," as he develops and pitches ideas for a new, all-service department store to meet women's needs in 19th-century London.
NEWS
October 15, 2013
For reporter Jean Marbella to take shots at Dr. Ben Carson for his political views makes her look like she is not too bright - particularly in a Baltimore-based (albeit liberal) newspaper ( "Carson is quoting Lenin to criticize Obamacare. Is the reference bogus?" Oct. 12). I know that Dr. Carson is not a Democrat, but that doesn't make him a criminal, does it? Is that what we have come to? Dr. Carson is a phenomenal individual with a pretty good resume I would gladly put up against anyone at The Sun. Despite having been raised in dire poverty in a single-parent household in Detroit, he rose to become a full professor of neurosurgery, oncology, plastic surgery and pediatrics and directed the department of pediatric neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins for more than 25 years.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
A recent appointee to the Baltimore City school board resigned Thursday, according to the mayor's office, which said it had discovered inconsistencies in his resume. Anthony A. Hamilton said he held a master's degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Education, according to biographical information on the board's website and a news release from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Gov. Martin O'Malley announcing his appointment to the board in June. But a Hopkins spokeswoman said the university never awarded him a degree and a review of the school's database did not turn up a student by that name.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2012
It has become part of college sports -- as ingrained as dunks and FieldTurf -- for large universities to accept prized basketball and football recruits and other athletes under more forgiving admissions criteria than are used for other students. Less understood is what happens to these top athletes once they arrive in their college classrooms. Do their grades ever catch up to those of their teammates or the rest of the student body? Do they remain in school and graduate? Interviews and documents, obtained by The Baltimore Sun through more than a dozen public records requests, offer a rare profile of hundreds of these athletes and show that the "special admits" typically have not performed as well as other players in the classroom and pose unique and expensive academic challenges at the University of Maryland, North Carolina State, Georgia Tech and other schools.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2012
For Erica Hamlett-Nicholson's 11-year-old son, Shawn Nowlin was his most trusted confidant when the Hazelwood Elementary/Middle School fifth-grader suffered from depression caused by his parents' separation. For Duanelle Woodard's nephew, he was the guidance counselor who helped him secure placement in a high school of his choice. And for Antoine Jackson, Nowlin was the heavy-handed administrator who suspended his son for the first time in his academic career. But Nowlin was a hall monitor, not a child and family therapist as he claimed, according to Harford County prosecutors and Baltimore City school officials.
NEWS
By Jo Anna Daemmrich and Jo Anna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2001
One-third of the teachers in Baltimore's worst schools do not have the basic teaching credentials required to be certified by the state - 50 percent more than in other city schools, according to a report presented yesterday to the state education board. Baltimore has a far higher percentage of uncertified teachers than the state average, the report found, and the largest percentage of them work in underachieving schools that consistently rank near the bottom of the state, judging by standardized tests and other performance measures.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2004
It was Monday, the opening night of the Democratic Convention, past 10 p.m. Over on ABC, anchor Peter Jennings was expounding on the latest horse-race poll pitting Democrat John Kerry against President Bush. On Fox News Channel, Alan Colmes was wanly defending Bill Clinton against the charge that he was a liberal. As reports from the mainstream media fall into familiar patterns, a new form of political coverage is emerging online. The upstarts are approximately 30 Web loggers - bloggers - who for the first time have received credentials from the Democratic National Convention to file their own brand of political reporting.
NEWS
May 2, 2011
Kevin Seawright, the high-ranking school department official who resigned Thursday after The Sun questioned his academic credentials, may have been good at his job. But that doesn't change the fact that no one apparently bothered to check out his background before offering him the post. Either the Baltimore school system decided it didn't care that one of its top officials had degrees from unaccredited universities — in effect, no academic qualifications at all — or it didn't know.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2011
This is the time of year when college basketball fans attempt to forecast the teams in the NCAA tournament brackets as if filling in words in a crossword puzzle. Predicting and seeding the 68-team field may be an entertaining pastime for fans - and a lucrative one for pundits - but it's not a practice Maryland coach Gary Williams says he's engaging in with his Terps team. What would be the point? Williams and his players know as well as anybody that Maryland - which plays its final regular-season road game against Miami on Wednesday night - is a long shot to advance to the NCAA tournament for the third straight season.
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