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By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,sun reporter | June 18, 2007
She croons, writes poems and wears leopard-print Mary Jane shoes. He strums guitar and mandolin, pens short stories and makes up songs on demand. Their "crust punk" band sings of fruits, vegetables and assorted pets, often in Russian. Hanna Badalova and Jared Fischer have always been "musical, theatrical and artistic," as Badalova puts it. But if the laid-back Parkville couple love to air their aesthetic ids, they've never had a chance to do so like their latest - as central characters in a loopy new CBS comedy series, Creature Comforts.
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NEWS
August 20, 2013
I enjoyed Mike McGrew's article regarding the Millennials ( "What's a parent to do with a Millennial?" Aug. 12). I grew up in the 1940s and '50s, and we did not have central heat, central air, television, computers or indoor plumbing. But guess what? I survived! Today's kids have too many material comforts and want more. And who gives it all to them? Their doting parents. Right on, Mr. McGrew! Ruth Lashley, Elkton
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NEWS
September 13, 2010
Basir Jamil expressed himself eloquently in his article "Growing up Muslim" (Sept. 12). I'm sure he echoes the sentiments of many other Muslim-Americans. His analogy, that blaming Muslims for terrorism is like blaming all Christians for the KKK, had both substance and point. When I consider discrimination in the United States, two thoughts emerge. Evolution worked to produce an intense, natural inclination in human beings to separate themselves into coalitions; us against them.
NEWS
September 13, 2010
Basir Jamil expressed himself eloquently in his article "Growing up Muslim" (Sept. 12). I'm sure he echoes the sentiments of many other Muslim-Americans. His analogy, that blaming Muslims for terrorism is like blaming all Christians for the KKK, had both substance and point. When I consider discrimination in the United States, two thoughts emerge. Evolution worked to produce an intense, natural inclination in human beings to separate themselves into coalitions; us against them.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | March 31, 1995
Washington. -- Americans are at each other's throats these days because some politicians are telling them that these are the worst of times.We are encouraged to blame those who do not look like us or think like us for all our grievances.I got a bit of relief from this orgy of self-pity and scapegoating Wednesday when I read a Wall Street Journal article comparing family life in America now with what it was in 1974.I saw a mixed bag of change that showed us enjoying many creature comforts at reduced prices, yet paying more for some of the essentials of civilized life.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
As early as Friday, a group of Baltimore-based aid workers from a Johns Hopkins University affiliate plan to land in earthquake-ravaged Haiti and join others from the region and the United States in taking the first steps beyond the rescues. They'll start rebuilding. The mission of the trio from Jhpiego is to re-establish a system that connects pregnant women and newborns with proper care - no small task in a devastated city now facing aftershocks and increasingly desperate people short of medical care, food and water.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2001
RETIREMENT IS sweet for Edwin Maxim. The 78-year-old Davidsonville resident and his wife, June, love their five children and 10 grandchildren, and their life enriched with good friendships. Their yard is alive with chickens and geese, and flowers and songbirds. And then there's the motorcycle. Maxim's pride and joy is a two-tone teal, Honda Gold Wing 1500. From Canada to Mexico, the bike has carried him through beautiful countryside and great adventures. The motorcycle, which Maxim has owned since 1993, is a gadget-lover's dream come true.
TRAVEL
By ALFRED BORCOVER and ALFRED BORCOVER,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 16, 2006
For most travelers, airports are one of those places you want to get in and out of as quickly as possible, preferably in minutes and, at worst, a few hours. Sometimes longer stays are unavoidable. Take Viktor Navorski, the Tom Hanks character in The Terminal, who spent months trapped at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport. In the real world, however, it's not inconceivable to be stuck in an airport for long periods -- hours, not months -- due to airplane mechanical problems, severe weather and extreme layovers.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN COLUMNIST | January 15, 2003
"Like nothing else." - Hummer slogan LeBron James' celebrated schoolboy basketball career may go down the tubes. But, man, he sure has nice wheels. Maybe you heard that Ohio high school officials are investigating whether James, an 18-year-old who could be the No. 1 pick in the NBA draft this year, broke any eligibility rules by tooling around in his new Hummer H2. James reportedly got the H2 as a birthday gift from his mother. But the Hummer has a base price of $49,190. And when a high school player rides around in something that goes for that number of Benjamins, it's not just eyebrows that get raised, it's entire facial and skeletal structures.
TRAVEL
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2004
A growling outboard motor pushed our boat slowly along the winding channels of the Tamarindo estuary. Crocodiles peered at us from the coffee-colored water, then slipped beneath the surface among the mangrove roots. Somewhere deep in the forest, howler monkeys hooted at our passing. Then the cell phone rang, wrecking our fantasy of motoring through the jungle aboard the African Queen. But the phone was a reminder that we had come to Costa Rica's northwest Guanacaste province because of its easy accessibility to some of the country's rich natural heritage, and also its creature comforts.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2010
When her family was thinking about moving to Texas three years ago, Maggie Mei Lewis, then barely in her teens, so wanted to stay in Maryland that she hatched a seemingly far-fetched plan. "I thought, 'I'll write a book, and I'll make enough money to stay here,' " says Lewis, 16, who lives in Turkey Point. She still hasn't earned enough to be independent, but the result of her labors — "Moonlight Memoirs: Remembering That Family and Friends Are Forever," a richly illustrated children's book — recently took first prize in the spirituality category of the Next Generation Indie Book Awards, a competition for self-published authors around the world.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
As early as Friday, a group of Baltimore-based aid workers from a Johns Hopkins University affiliate plan to land in earthquake-ravaged Haiti and join others from the region and the United States in taking the first steps beyond the rescues. They'll start rebuilding. The mission of the trio from Jhpiego is to re-establish a system that connects pregnant women and newborns with proper care - no small task in a devastated city now facing aftershocks and increasingly desperate people short of medical care, food and water.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | August 24, 2008
Freshman move-in officially began at 9 a.m. yesterday at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. But Karin Readel, a faculty member who has supervised seven of these things, knew to show up early. "Will they wait until 9?" she asked. "Nooooo." Sure enough, at 8:20 a.m., families began arriving at UMBC's Patapsco Hall in their minivans and SUVs stuffed with suitcases, computers, flat-panel TVs, toilet paper, bedding supplies, refrigerators and cases of bottled water. Readel, a senior lecturer in the geography department, stood in the center of it all. She has been the faculty mentor at Patapsco Hall for seven years, meaning she has weekly office hours at the dorm, takes students to plays and cultural events, and counsels them when they miss home or are going through a breakup.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,sun reporter | June 18, 2007
She croons, writes poems and wears leopard-print Mary Jane shoes. He strums guitar and mandolin, pens short stories and makes up songs on demand. Their "crust punk" band sings of fruits, vegetables and assorted pets, often in Russian. Hanna Badalova and Jared Fischer have always been "musical, theatrical and artistic," as Badalova puts it. But if the laid-back Parkville couple love to air their aesthetic ids, they've never had a chance to do so like their latest - as central characters in a loopy new CBS comedy series, Creature Comforts.
TRAVEL
By ALFRED BORCOVER and ALFRED BORCOVER,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 16, 2006
For most travelers, airports are one of those places you want to get in and out of as quickly as possible, preferably in minutes and, at worst, a few hours. Sometimes longer stays are unavoidable. Take Viktor Navorski, the Tom Hanks character in The Terminal, who spent months trapped at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport. In the real world, however, it's not inconceivable to be stuck in an airport for long periods -- hours, not months -- due to airplane mechanical problems, severe weather and extreme layovers.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | June 26, 2006
Ocean City-- --The men were here to fix the air conditioner, which, it turns out, needed a new thermostat because the cats keep knocking it off the wall. The washer and dryer at the Worcester County Humane Society were also on the fritz - not to mention the animal shelter has a chronic septic issue. The place needs all the help it can get. And people do help. They donate blankets and beds for the 100-or-so cats and 60-or-so dogs, money for the $800 weekly food bill from Food Lion. They volunteer their time, time and time again.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | November 27, 1994
Here are some gift ideas for the dog or cat love of your life.1. Barking for bagels. These may look like miniature bagels, but Dog 'N' Dunkers are actually freeze-dried beef, chicken and lamb snacks for your dog. They're made without preservatives and look so edible that the manufacturer stamps the side of the box with a bright orange message: Not for Human Consumption. $3.99 at Animal Authority.2. How does your catnip garden grow? A self-contained window garden for growing catnip can be a fun treat for both owner and pet. Your cat may have to wait some weeks for this treat, but it'll be worth it. $14 at Over the Garden Gate.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | November 21, 2005
Roy Gilbert rolled his tractor-trailer into a bay at the Baltimore Travel Plaza and spent a few minutes hooking things up for the night. A year ago, he would have left his engine idling - spewing a gallon's worth of diesel exhaust each hour - to keep his cab warm and lighted. But a new truck stop system lets Gilbert shut off his engine for the night and still have access to warm or cool filtered air, 44 cable channels, phone and computer lines, movies and electricity. "It saves owner-operators like myself a lot of money," said Gilbert, 33, a Garrett County trucker who pays about $2.60 a gallon for diesel and $1.88 per hour to hook his truck to the self-serve system, operated from the cab by a touch-screen and magnetic charge card.
FEATURES
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2005
The plight of the piggly-wigglies -- that is to say, guinea pigs -- had gnawed at Sue Wilmot for nearly a decade. Nothing saddened her like the spectacle of the average animal shelter, where unwanted guineas inhabit cracked aquariums, in many cases denied their favorite snacks of fresh parsley and watermelon and the ping-pong balls they like to play with. During visiting hours, children descend on them, hands grasping like talons. At night, the guineas cower beneath the slit-eyed surveillance of rows and rows of cats.
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