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By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Derek Waters, a Lutherville native, is the mind behind Comedy Central's hit show "Drunk History," and presumably tapped into his own sports background to get ready for this week's Sports Heroes episode. The online outtakes for the episode include a clip of Waters training with Ravens outside linebacker Terrell Suggs, and Suggs did what Suggs is known to do. He made me laugh. In the video, Suggs tells Waters that swagger is the most important thing in football, and being tall and dark-skinned would help him with that.
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Derek Waters, a Lutherville native, is the mind behind Comedy Central's hit show "Drunk History," and presumably tapped into his own sports background to get ready for this week's Sports Heroes episode. The online outtakes for the episode include a clip of Waters training with Ravens outside linebacker Terrell Suggs, and Suggs did what Suggs is known to do. He made me laugh. In the video, Suggs tells Waters that swagger is the most important thing in football, and being tall and dark-skinned would help him with that.
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NEWS
February 17, 2012
Sexual union between a man and woman is the only reason the human race has survived. If the supreme intelligence that created us had made one sex, or if marriage had only been between members of the same sex, none of us would be here now. Men and women are not the same. Each has a unique role in the creation of life. Traditional and same- sex marriage are not the same either. The former is the framework in which human life has continued to survive for thousands of years. It is the only setting in which life can be created and preserved according to the plan of the author of life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Four instruments fashioned from magnets and turntables and thick metal springs are conversing in a gallery of the Walters Art Museum . They pop and hum, plink like the teeth of a comb. One calls to mind an amplified heartbeat. Another sounds like someone far away brushing a drum head. Like drunken guests at a party, their tones blend, then break into discordant sounds. One bellows at unexpected intervals. "These are idiosyncratic machines," says their creator, artist and musician Neil Feather.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Baltimore's Nikki Lewis will compete on Thursday night's episode of "Supermarket Superstar," the new Lifetime show in which hopeful food entrepreneurs compete to get their products on grocery store shelves. The show is hosted by Rosedale native Stacy Keibler.   Lewis is the developer of Mallow Crunchies, a marshmallow treat she sells at area farmers markets as well as at The Mallow Bar , her own dessert cafe in Rosedale.    Each week on "Supermarket Superstar," three contestants compete for $10,000 in cash and $100,000 in product development, with an ultimate goal of having the A&P supermarket chain put the winning contestant's product in its stores.
NEWS
February 5, 2014
For those of us who were drawn to live in Columbia by the Rouse vision of a "garden for growing people," the shooting at the Columbia Mall could be seen as the end of a dream ( "Columbia mall shooting victims honored on one-week anniversary of the attack," Feb. 1). Yet it does not have to be that way. The Mall was and is Columbia's downtown - the heart of the community. We cannot let one act of a deeply disturbed person destroy the commitment to the good that remains in the community and the capacity of the community to carry on the original vision of what Columbia was meant to be. Instead of being frightened away from the Mall because of what happened, we should make a special point of going there - to say with our presence that no one can destroy the sense of fun in joining together that makes a community real.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 19, 1991
Syndication to non-public TV stations, weekly rerun screenings on Maryland Public Television or re-editing of old shows into special editions are among the possible continued lives for "Crabs," the locally produced MPT comedy show whose last scheduled airing is due May 1."Anything could happen," says producer/writer/co-creator Dick George, including a chance at continued production of the 7-year-old pastiche of local and national skits.George said this week that while the show's original partial underwriter, Baltimore Spice Co. (makers of Old Bay crab seasoning)
FEATURES
April 3, 1994
Bill Watterson, creator of the "Calvin and Hobbes" comic strip, will be on vacation through Dec. 31, 1994. As a replacement, a series of classic "Calvin and Hobbes" strips will appear beginning today until Mr. Watterson returns.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 29, 2007
No one does biography better than American Masters. And the long-running PBS series outdoes even itself tonight with Good Ol' Charles Schulz, a clear-eyed look at the creator of the Peanuts comic strip. If American Masters has a flaw, it is the tendency to confuse biography with appreciation - and consistently ignore the shadows in celebrated lives. Leonard Bernstein: Reaching for the Note is one of the most powerful TV biographies ever made, but it soft-pedals the acclaimed conductor's drug use and marital infidelity.
FEATURES
By Verne Gay and Verne Gay,Newsday | December 20, 1992
"In Living Color" fans, take heart: Fox says that the Sunday hit show will be completely, absolutely unaffected by the departure of its creator, Keenen Ivory Wayans.How so? The network said that Matt Wickline and Sandy Frank, two writers from the first season, will now become consultants on the show. Mr. Wayans, as you may or may not know, left in a huff because he didn't want the network to air reruns of the show he created on Thursdays.As Daily Variety, which first reported the breach last Thursdaynoted, he feared it would detract from the new episodes now airing on Sundays (Fox also sparred with him constantly over show content)
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
Artist Neil Feather, who builds mechanized musical instruments from bowling balls, film projectors and cigar boxes, among other objects, received this year's $25,000 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize on Saturday evening. Trained as a ceramicist, Feather said he draws inspiration from antique machinery and "strange technology that didn't make it to the mainstream. " "I like listening to all the matter around me vibrating," Feather, 58, said in a phone interview after the award ceremony at the Walters Art Museum . The Waverly resident is a founding member of the Red Room Collective and the High Zero Foundation, groups that have pushed Baltimore to a vanguard of the international experimental music movement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
William G. "Bill" Evans, an award-winning Baltimore advertising executive who was the creative force behind the enduring "Charm City" advertising campaign of the early 1970s, died June 20 of cancer at the Hospice of Queen Anne's in Centreville. He was 83. "Bill certainly came out of the 'Mad Men' world. He was one of the first new breed of intellectual advertising writers. And he was definitely a character. There is no question about that. He was a very unique guy and writer," recalled ad executive Allan Charles, who began working with Mr. Evans in the early 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
If you are one of the 1.2 million viewers the Comedy Central series "Broad City" attracts on average each week, you might have noticed a nod to Baltimore in the recent episode "Stolen Phone. " When a distraught Ilana - one of the show's two protagonists - bangs on the door of her phoneless best friend's New York City apartment after a panicked search, Abbi calmly greets her in a black-and-teal Maryland Institute College of Art sweatshirt. No, it was not a thrift shop find or a random hoodie selected by the wardrobe department.
NEWS
By David Horsey | February 25, 2014
Especially when it comes to economic policy, too many politicians are motivated by myths more than by facts. A prime example: the myth of the job creators. Republicans, such as Speaker of the House John Boehner, talk of job creators in reverent, worshipful terms. In their vision of how the world works, it is these brave titans of capitalism who, with no help from anyone else, build the companies that create jobs for American workers. To Mr. Boehner and his party, anything that inhibits job creators in their endeavors -- taxes, environmental laws, financial regulations -- is a job killer.
NEWS
February 5, 2014
For those of us who were drawn to live in Columbia by the Rouse vision of a "garden for growing people," the shooting at the Columbia Mall could be seen as the end of a dream ( "Columbia mall shooting victims honored on one-week anniversary of the attack," Feb. 1). Yet it does not have to be that way. The Mall was and is Columbia's downtown - the heart of the community. We cannot let one act of a deeply disturbed person destroy the commitment to the good that remains in the community and the capacity of the community to carry on the original vision of what Columbia was meant to be. Instead of being frightened away from the Mall because of what happened, we should make a special point of going there - to say with our presence that no one can destroy the sense of fun in joining together that makes a community real.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
Derek Waters, creator and host of Comedy Central's "Drunk History," says his "dream for any city" is to find stories that are "true" and that make viewers wonder: "Why weren't we taught that in school?" The Lutherville native is back in Baltimore this week filming for Season 2 of the cable series that was watched by more than a million viewers a week last year in its rookie run. Thursday night, he was at Mother's Federal Hill Grille filming part of the episode that will be devoted to Baltimore stories.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 12, 1994
Steven Bochco says that even he didn't anticipate the firestorm of controversy that greeted "NYPD Blue" this fall, and that he hopes it's finally starting to ebb."Sure, I anticipated some of the controversy last summer when ** we began to get so much attention so many months before the show was on," Bochco, the show's creator, said yesterday."But it just snowballed and intensified."And there was a point where it was very uncomfortable."There was a point where I was genuinely dismayed at the vehemence and the willingness by people to give in to censorship instead of just saying, "OK, this is not my cup of tea, and I'll just watch something else.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 7, 2004
On the eve of the fifth season of The Sopranos, David Chase, its creator and executive producer, offered a few thoughts on the show's meaning, his future, and the horror of network television. How is The Sopranos different from the rest of television? The function of an hour drama is to reassure the American people that it's OK to go out and buy stuff. It's all about flattering the audience, making them feel as if all the authority figures have our best interests at heart. Doctors, lawyers, psychiatrists: Sure, they have their little foibles, some of them are grouchy, but by God, they care.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 21, 2013
During the Christmas season when many celebrate a unique and miraculous birth, what the late Pope John Paul II called "a culture of death" continues its march. Last week, the upper house of the Belgian Senate voted to extend a 2002 law legalizing euthanasia for adults so that it includes incurably ill children. The amended law will now have to be voted on by the Parliament's lower house, a vote expected to take place before elections in May, but if passed, writes The New York Times, children afflicted with "constant and unbearable physical suffering" and "equipped with a capacity for discernment" could then be legally euthanized in Belgium.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Comedy Central Wednesday renewed three series including "Drunk History" from Lutherville's Derek Waters, a creator and executive producer of the show. The other two are "Key & Peele" and "Brickleberry. " The pickup will give the former a fourth season, while the latter will go into its third. This was the first season for "Drunk History," which in addition to Waters is executive produced by Jeremy Konner, along with Gary Sanchez Productions' Will Ferrell, Adam McKay, Chris Henchy and Owen Burke.
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