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By Bruce McCabe and Bruce McCabe,Boston Globe | August 6, 1995
"I remind myself: I am not that girl. I am not that girl. I've changed. I've grown. I am now a psychologist who over the years has learned to give up her Indian print sun dresses and bulky smocks for tailored skirts, who carries a black Coach leather briefcase."These are psychologist Lauren Slater's thoughts while driving to a therapists' team meeting for a patient at the very Boston hospital where she was confined on five separate occasions between the ages of 14 and 24 with her own debilitating mental illness.
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
Author and Baltimore teacher Sheri Booker has won the NAACP Image Award for outstanding literary work by a debut author. Booker, a teacher at Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women and a graduate of both Notre Dame of Maryland University and Goucher College, won the award for her Baltimore-based memoir "Nine Years Under: Coming of Age in an Inner City Funeral Home," which recounts the nine years she spent working at the Wylie Funeral Home...
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1997
Mary Karr's mother drank heavily, abused her children and kept a tragic secret.Frank McCourt went shoeless and hungry in the slums of Limerick, Ireland.It was tough going, yet both survived and have riveted readers with tales of their troubled childhoods, contributing two more best sellers to the many-splendored genre known as "creative" or "literary" nonfiction.The literary nonfiction boom that spawned these memoirs and many others hasn't bypassed Goucher College. Today, the school's Center for Graduate and Continuing Studies holds its second annual mid-Atlantic Creative Nonfiction Summer Writers' Conference (complete with commemorative T-shirt)
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By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 2004
Although Centennial High School students have a yearbook, newspaper and literary magazine, a void remained, until recently, for those who wanted to tell nonfiction stories in a creative way. Enter Maryland Voices, a student-run journal that began publishing this year, featuring writing by students in grades eight through 12. The first edition includes stories about dealing with the loss of a loved one and overcoming shyness. The editors, Nikita Parson, Bridget Forsyth, Kaitlin Schwarz and Tazeen Qudsi, along with adviser Rus VanWestervelt, bill the publication as creative nonfiction, "the telling of a true story in an interesting and creative way," as they put it in a news release.
NEWS
By MICHAEL GRAY | August 24, 1997
By the time you finish reading this, you may know a lot more about me than you might want to. I offer that warning because I am feeling the need to catch up with a startling new journalistic trend: total exposure.Colleagues of mine throughout the Fourth Estate are busy this summer baring both their bodies and their bodily functions in the name of journalism, and I'm wondering what to do about it.Here's what I am talking about: In the space of one week thismonth, I saw John F. Kennedy Jr. stripped naked in the pages of his own New Republic-meets-Highlights for Children magazine, George.
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
Author and Baltimore teacher Sheri Booker has won the NAACP Image Award for outstanding literary work by a debut author. Booker, a teacher at Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women and a graduate of both Notre Dame of Maryland University and Goucher College, won the award for her Baltimore-based memoir "Nine Years Under: Coming of Age in an Inner City Funeral Home," which recounts the nine years she spent working at the Wylie Funeral Home...
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 2004
Although Centennial High School students have a yearbook, newspaper and literary magazine, a void remained, until recently, for those who wanted to tell nonfiction stories in a creative way. Enter Maryland Voices, a student-run journal that began publishing this year, featuring writing by students in grades eight through 12. The first edition includes stories about dealing with the loss of a loved one and overcoming shyness. The editors, Nikita Parson, Bridget Forsyth, Kaitlin Schwarz and Tazeen Qudsi, along with adviser Rus VanWestervelt, bill the publication as creative nonfiction, "the telling of a true story in an interesting and creative way," as they put it in a news release.
NEWS
October 14, 2013
Retired Lt. Col. J. Stephen and Susan Rollins of Aberdeen announce the engagement of their daughter, Courtney Elizabeth, to Andrew A. Goldbeck, son of James A. and Susan Goldbeck of Baltimore. Rollins graduated from The John Carroll School and the College of Notre Dame of Maryland with a bachelor of arts in English and a creative nonfiction minor. She is a librarian with the Baltimore County Public Library and pursuing a master's degree in library science from North Carolina Central University.
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By Diane Scharper and Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2010
'The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,' Rebecca Skloot, Crown, 320 pages, $26. Although Henrietta Lacks died of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1951, her cells are alive 60 years later. Unlike most cells, hers (renamed HeLa, from her first and last names) are considered immortal. Why? Rebecca Skloot offers several answers - from the scientific to the mystical - in "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks," her multifaceted debut book. Skloot begins her account by explaining the importance of HeLa cells.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 7, 2003
The apogee of railroading in this country occurred just after World War II (which had provided the rail system its heaviest-ever traffic), and just before airplanes, pipelines and highway vehicles assumed most of that system's chores. Accordingly, Richard C. Carpenter went back to 1946 when, after prodigious research, he set out to map all 254,037 route miles of the U.S. rail grid - to show stations and junctions, tunnels and track plans, with county lines, sometimes four miles to the inch.
NEWS
By MICHAEL GRAY | August 24, 1997
By the time you finish reading this, you may know a lot more about me than you might want to. I offer that warning because I am feeling the need to catch up with a startling new journalistic trend: total exposure.Colleagues of mine throughout the Fourth Estate are busy this summer baring both their bodies and their bodily functions in the name of journalism, and I'm wondering what to do about it.Here's what I am talking about: In the space of one week thismonth, I saw John F. Kennedy Jr. stripped naked in the pages of his own New Republic-meets-Highlights for Children magazine, George.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1997
Mary Karr's mother drank heavily, abused her children and kept a tragic secret.Frank McCourt went shoeless and hungry in the slums of Limerick, Ireland.It was tough going, yet both survived and have riveted readers with tales of their troubled childhoods, contributing two more best sellers to the many-splendored genre known as "creative" or "literary" nonfiction.The literary nonfiction boom that spawned these memoirs and many others hasn't bypassed Goucher College. Today, the school's Center for Graduate and Continuing Studies holds its second annual mid-Atlantic Creative Nonfiction Summer Writers' Conference (complete with commemorative T-shirt)
FEATURES
By Bruce McCabe and Bruce McCabe,Boston Globe | August 6, 1995
"I remind myself: I am not that girl. I am not that girl. I've changed. I've grown. I am now a psychologist who over the years has learned to give up her Indian print sun dresses and bulky smocks for tailored skirts, who carries a black Coach leather briefcase."These are psychologist Lauren Slater's thoughts while driving to a therapists' team meeting for a patient at the very Boston hospital where she was confined on five separate occasions between the ages of 14 and 24 with her own debilitating mental illness.
NEWS
March 16, 2008
Meade High School has received authorization as an International Baccalaureate World School and will start an IB diploma program in August. The authorization to use the rigorous college-preparatory curriculum marks the end of two years of work by the Meade High School community. "We have already seen the impact that IB teacher training has had on students in the Extended Learning Program, as well as students who are not in the program, but taught by IB-trained teachers," Principal Daryl Kennedy said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Tucker and By Ken Tucker,Special to the Sun | November 5, 2000
"Angelhead: My Brother's Descent Into Madness," by Greg Bottoms. Crown. 207 pages. $22. Greg Bottoms has a terribly sad, frightening tale to tell about his big brother Michael, and he tells it as straightforwardly as his book's subtitle suggests. While still a teen-ager, Michael took drugs including hallucinogens that convinced him he'd seen God and angels (hence his nickname, "Angelhead"). He also began experiencing psychotic breaks that resulted in extreme depression and violent behavior.
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