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Creative Class

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NEWS
February 2, 2010
The proposal to allow WTMD to utilize the vacant Senator theater is a wise one ("WTMD bid to take over Senator draws concerns," Jan. 29). A post-industrial city such as Baltimore needs to attract and keep (as Richard Florida defines it) it's "creative class" -- exactly the type of listener WTMD attracts. While the station may be located on the Towson campus, WTMD's reach extends beyond college students, and it is one of the few unique cultural arts institutions left in Baltimore.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 18, 2013
Two seniors met for the first time at the Broadmead retirement community cafeteria Oct. 7. One was Libby Murphy, 83, a longtime Roland Park area resident, who has lived at Broadmead in Cockeysville for almost two years. The other was Mackenzie Gerrity, 17, of Stoneleigh, a senior at Friends School. Gerrity, wearing her Friends lacrosse jacket, was there as a biographer, to tell Murphy's life story in two or three pages for a nonfiction creative writing class project, or as Murphy explained, "to put it in black and white.
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BUSINESS
By BILL ATKINSON | April 26, 2005
RICHARD Florida wants us to know that he's single, straight and politically an independent. Just an ordinary college professor. Not someone with the bent, much less the power, to undermine the fabric of American society. But that's just the sort of attacks that have been hurled at him over the argument in his unexpected best-selling book, The Rise of the Creative Class, that being welcoming to gays and lesbians is a key ingredient in a city's economic success. Gays, he says, bring cultural creativity and amenities such as art galleries, restaurants and bars.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 22, 2013
Baltimore is your unpredictable uncle in a bathrobe - sweet one minute, grouchy the next; as kind as an old friar today, as menacing as a hit man tomorrow. This town will baffle you. It is sane and insane, charming and ugly, cosmopolitan and puny, brilliant and middling, future thinking and stuck in its ways. Maybe every city is like this, particularly those with lingering violent crime. Every city with lingering violent crime probably has an old-school bakery or a revered deli where you can still get amazing smoked herring.
NEWS
June 25, 2009
New York's Lower East Side was a run-down neighborhood blighted by crime and decay before young artists began moving in during the 1970s and turned the place into a lively entertainment destination. An infusion of creative types in the 1990s transformed Washington's distressed U Street corridor into a dynamic cultural hub. Now Baltimore is aiming to engineer a similar urban renaissance in the long-beleaguered Greenmount West neighborhood, which forms the eastern half of the city's fledgling Station North Arts and Entertainment District.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 22, 2013
Baltimore is your unpredictable uncle in a bathrobe - sweet one minute, grouchy the next; as kind as an old friar today, as menacing as a hit man tomorrow. This town will baffle you. It is sane and insane, charming and ugly, cosmopolitan and puny, brilliant and middling, future thinking and stuck in its ways. Maybe every city is like this, particularly those with lingering violent crime. Every city with lingering violent crime probably has an old-school bakery or a revered deli where you can still get amazing smoked herring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | August 8, 2004
He's here, he's there, he's everywhere. Urban planning guru and author Richard Florida has been to nearly 300 cities worldwide touting his theory of the creative class and how it might transform cities. "Richard isn't hemmed in by disciplines," says Oxford business professor Gordon Clark. "That allows him to see connections that people in a very narrow field of research might not see." But some detractors complain that Florida's theories aren't new and that his proposals ignore the crucial role that families play in economic development and holds out no help for the urban poor.
NEWS
July 16, 2006
Here's what readers have been saying online about The Sun's American Brewery project and what might be done to help the neighborhood: "Take a trip up to Philadelphia and there are neighborhoods that are being revitalized by offering space for artists to ply their trade. Others who want to live in neighborhoods like that move in, and with that comes commerce. The city could work with private developers to turn houses and other buildings into artist lofts and small businesses like restaurants and other retail.
NEWS
By Emily Griffey | July 6, 2004
MAYOR MARTIN O'Malley is trying to attract a "creative class" to Baltimore. He wants to attract more people like me - students, young professionals, artists - who will bring new opportunities to the city and a diverse, skilled work force for established companies. According to Baltimore City's Web site, this "creative class," by implication, would enjoy living in Baltimore by dining at sidewalk cafes, attending outdoor concerts and sipping wine at gallery openings. I can guarantee that my friends and peers would enjoy this fabulous life.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | October 30, 2003
An unusual solution to the nation's economic downturn was proposed last night at Baltimore's second annual Cultural Town Meeting -- spend more money on the arts. "Our research shows that it's illogical public policy to cut funding to the arts at a time when governments need revenue to pay for critical services," said Randy Cohen, vice president of research for Americans for the Arts, a nationwide advocacy group. "Support for the arts does not come at the expense of economic development."
NEWS
September 27, 2012
Print media holds a special place in our hearts as it chronicles the important social and political trends in our lives ("So young, so pretty: death of a magazine," Sept. 21). The Urbanite was a vibrant and well-conceived print, marketing and social media platform for Baltimore's continuing urban renewal. We need to pause and wonder why we were unable as a community to support this beautiful addition to the print media landscape. Kudos to the Urbanite led by Tracy Ward and her team for taking a bold step in the right direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
Someone asked me recently if this was the year that the tapas trend was finally going to go away. In fact, it's not a trend anymore; it's the way many of us prefer to eat. Even with a restaurant like Tapas Teatro , which does so many things right, there are still some potential perils in a tapas-based evening. Food flies at you fast, and it's hard sometimes to keep pace. The table's real estate can get overpopulated, and you can start to feel as if the meal is slipping into anarchy.
NEWS
April 9, 2010
City officials backed by Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake are to be applauded for moving ahead with plans to create a new arts and entertainment district on Baltimore's West Side near downtown. The area has been pegged for redevelopment as a cultural hub for more than a decade, but the pace of change has been disappointing. Anything that helps jump-start the process is all to the good. One might well ask why the area even needs a formal designation as an arts and entertainment district, given the ambitious renovation of the Hippodrome Theatre (which re-opened on the west side in 2003)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 3, 2010
I 've long given up predicting where and how Baltimore will reinvent itself. So, one day this week, on a walk down Guilford Avenue, I spotted the construction a few blocks east. I also drew a deep breath. A new structure was rising at Greenmount Avenue and Oliver Street facing the Gothic Revival entrance to Green Mount Cemetery. On a perfect spring day, with the old burial ground's walls enclosing hundreds of flowering and budding trees, it seemed perfectly natural for some new housing to be rising here.
NEWS
February 2, 2010
The proposal to allow WTMD to utilize the vacant Senator theater is a wise one ("WTMD bid to take over Senator draws concerns," Jan. 29). A post-industrial city such as Baltimore needs to attract and keep (as Richard Florida defines it) it's "creative class" -- exactly the type of listener WTMD attracts. While the station may be located on the Towson campus, WTMD's reach extends beyond college students, and it is one of the few unique cultural arts institutions left in Baltimore.
NEWS
June 25, 2009
New York's Lower East Side was a run-down neighborhood blighted by crime and decay before young artists began moving in during the 1970s and turned the place into a lively entertainment destination. An infusion of creative types in the 1990s transformed Washington's distressed U Street corridor into a dynamic cultural hub. Now Baltimore is aiming to engineer a similar urban renaissance in the long-beleaguered Greenmount West neighborhood, which forms the eastern half of the city's fledgling Station North Arts and Entertainment District.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | October 29, 2003
Last year, when Baltimore's arts organizations gathered for a Cultural Town Meeting with the mayor, it represented a first step toward joining forces to combat common concerns. Tonight, as the groups gather for the second-annual meeting, they know it's time to get down to business. "We're going to be taking a look at the issues that are out there and that people are living with every day on the street," said Randi Vega, cultural affairs director for the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts.
NEWS
September 27, 2012
Print media holds a special place in our hearts as it chronicles the important social and political trends in our lives ("So young, so pretty: death of a magazine," Sept. 21). The Urbanite was a vibrant and well-conceived print, marketing and social media platform for Baltimore's continuing urban renewal. We need to pause and wonder why we were unable as a community to support this beautiful addition to the print media landscape. Kudos to the Urbanite led by Tracy Ward and her team for taking a bold step in the right direction.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 20, 2008
Societies that are tolerant, free and diverse tend to be richer and happier than societies that aren't. Maryland has shown this for decades. Now is the time to extend the legacy by legalizing same-sex marriage. The move would beam welcome signals not just to gays and lesbians but to all members of the young "creative class" who represent the economic and social future. Not coincidentally, it's the right thing to do. More and more research shows how inextricably linked tolerance and prosperity really are. No religion, race or sexual orientation has a monopoly on talent.
NEWS
By Pamela Haag | August 8, 2007
I grew up in Baltimore, and I live in Baltimore, yet I encounter my city most vividly on HBO. Sunday nights at 10 o'clock I sit in my living room, eat popcorn, and watch David Simon's critically exalted drama, The Wire. Like other fans, I can't wait for the fifth season to begin - hopefully this fall. Watching The Wire in Baltimore is surely different from watching it in Des Moines, Iowa, but not because its world feels like home. The violent, drug-saturated streets of West Baltimore that the series dissects with unsparing brilliance are about three miles from my house, but they might as well be 3,000.
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