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Creationism

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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 12, 2005
BOSTON - I don't know whether to call this good news, but something is happening when the opponents of evolution recast themselves as defenders of academic freedom and guardians of open debate. This is the take-home lesson from Kansas, where another in the apparently endless controversies over science and religion took place on the 80th anniversary of the Scopes trial. This time, hearings were called by the State Board of Education on whether to change the science standards and require that Charles Darwin's theory be challenged in the classroom.
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NEWS
September 22, 2014
The Ecumenical Leaders Group represents seven denominations of Christian churches in Maryland. We are heartsick about the impact climate change is having on our neighbors close to home and around the world and mindful that the survival and flourishing of all peoples depend on our ability to move from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources ( "Too much carbon, too little time," Sept. 11). Heat-trapping pollution like carbon dioxide and methane, released into the air by humans at unprecedented levels in the last hundred years, has damaged our climate and made our oceans more acidic.
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NEWS
October 3, 1996
PERHAPS SUPPORT for the teaching of creationism as a science would not seem anachronistic in Tennessee, a place where legislators discussed banning the teaching of evolution as fact last spring, 71 years after the Scopes Monkey trial there.But it comes as a surprise to see this topic surface in Howard County. School board candidate Jane Schuchardt brought the matter to the fore when she responded to two surveys by saying she backs the teaching of creationism as long as public school teachers refrain from injecting their personal opinions.
NEWS
By Rus VanWestervelt, rusvw13@gmail.com | May 14, 2014
Riderwood Elementary School is welcoming spring with an explosion of Earth-centered art and environmental accolades. A full year of lessons and projects about the earth and environmentalism culminated in the school's 6th annual art show on April 29. Art Goes Green, the brainchild of art teacher Candice Kirschnick , transformed the school's halls into colorful visual displays representing the four seasons and starring students' two- and...
NEWS
By LISA ANDERSON and LISA ANDERSON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 19, 2005
HARRISBURG, Pa. -- Although he denied that the concept of "intelligent design" advances any religious belief, a leading proponent of the idea has said it is less plausible to those who question or deny the existence of God, according to presentations made in federal court here yesterday. Michael Behe, a tenured biochemist at Lehigh University, took the stand for a second day as the first expert witness called by the defense in Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District. Entering its fourth week, the suit was brought against the district and school board by 11 parents of Dover students over a requirement that ninth-grade biology students be informed of intelligent design as a scientific alternative to evolution and referred to an intelligent design textbook, Of Pandas and People.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2000
An overwhelming majority of Americans think that creationism should be taught along with Darwin's theory of evolution in the public schools, according to a new nationwide survey by an independent polling organization. Some scientists characterized the seemingly contradictory findings as a quixotic attempt by the American public to accommodate incompatible world views. As Americans continue to argue over what children should learn about human origins, the poll offers encouragement to both sides in the debate.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 15, 1993
VISTA, Calif. -- The embattled but resilient "Christian right" majority of the Vista school board achieved last week what its three members had been promising for months: It formally opened the door to the teaching of creationism in the city's public schools.It did so in defiance of California educational guidelines, its own vehement teachers' association and over the complaints of many parents and students at a public meeting Thursday that dragged on past midnight.By a 3-2 vote, the board ordered that "discussions of divine creation, ultimate purposes, or ultimate causes [the 'why']
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 29, 1999
Drawing on the deep resources of "creation science" advocacy groups, American fundamentalists are arming themselves with the latest books challenging details of Darwinian theory, getting elected to majority positions on school boards and learning ways to word curricula so that creationism and evolution get equal respect.While they have gotten very good at making a case for teaching alternative theories, a small group of scientists and educators stands in their way.Most of America's children are not being taught that the world might have come into existence only 10,000 years ago, vs. the nearly 4.5 billion years advocated by scientists, and this is largely because of the SWAT-like efforts of the National Center for Science Education.
NEWS
November 11, 1996
THE INJECTION of creationism into the Howard County Board of Education race never seemed to faze the local electorate.Jane Schuchardt responded in questionnaires during the campaign that she supported introducing the religious concept into the school curriculum. Though that alone might seem enough to disqualify her in the eyes of many suburban voters, the Columbia area resident emerged victorious last Tuesday over rival Francine Wishnick.Why? For one, after initially giving clumsy replies to her stance on creationism, her later explanations apparently satisfied voters that she would not chip away at the constitutional wall between church and state.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1996
Howard County school board candidate Jane Schuchardt says Howard biology teachers ought to make students aware of creationism as an alternative theory to evolution -- a position at odds with what school officials say is the system's curriculum.While Schuchardt is not advocating that creationism be given more than a cursory explanation in the context of in-depth lessons on the theory of evolution, her views still have prompted concerns among some parents and others about the inclusion of religion in Howard science classrooms.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | May 11, 2014
Let's imagine for a moment a woman (we'll call her Nancy) who had a job but saw limited opportunity for advancement at her place of employment. So, Nancy began scribbling out unique product designs in her spare time - an exercise that eventually led to a patent for a brand new widget. But Nancy faced a problem common to every startup entrepreneur - lack of capital. She attempted to secure a loan from a number of local banks but was turned down due to lack of collateral. Seems our lending institutions have raised the stakes in the aftermath of the worst credit crunch in decades.
NEWS
By Jessica Gregg and Baltimore Sun Media Group | April 25, 2014
Devin Mack was in a figurative drawing class at Ithaca College more than a decade ago when his professor handed him a roll of wire and said, "Here, make a figurative drawing out of this. " Mack, who was studying cinema and photography at the school, made his first sculpture and took the first step into a career. Today he continues to make wire sculpture "large and small" out of everything from coat hangers to precious metal. Indeed, probably one of his best known sculptures is a 12-foot-tall honeybee outside of Baltimore Honey, a community-supported apiary in Woodberry.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
Amy Dickman from Owings Mills was hoping someone would have the recipe for the garlic herb cheese that was served with the breadsticks at Harvey's restaurant, which used to be located at Green Spring Station in Baltimore County. The restaurant and its adjacent gourmet shop closed some years ago, and since then she has attempted to re-create the spread time and time again, but it never tasted exactly right. Barbra Rosenberg from Baltimore also was a big fan of the Harvey's cheese spread, and when the restaurant closed she launched her own search for a recipe.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | March 2, 2014
Those of us of a certain age recall the scene all too well: Lucy pulling the football away just as Charlie Brown was about to kick it, visions of football glory dancing in his head. Charlie Brown always fell for the prank, believing that Lucy would finally come through next time around. Today's apologists for President Barack Obama believe (much like Charlie Brown) that the next policy or program will surely jump start a tepid, jobless recovery. And, as true believers, they are always surprised when it doesn't, when Lucy pulls the football.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Attorneys for Anne Arundel County and former County Executive John R. Leopold urged a judge Monday to throw out a lawsuit claiming the former executive improperly ordered police to compile "dossiers" on political rivals. Leopold, a Republican, resigned as county executive in February 2013 after he was found guilty of two counts of misconduct in office. The convictions were based on allegations that he forced police officers on his protective detail to erect campaign signs, collect campaign donations and compile the dossiers, and also required officers and other employees to drain his catheter bag. He is appealing those convictions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
Henry Walters and J.P. Morgan were frenemies. Both were the sons of powerful fathers. They didn't come into their own until they reached middle age, when they were widely acknowledged as two of the premier financiers of the Gilded Age. Both displayed an inclination toward collecting art as children. As grown-ups, the two titans competed over who would acquire the next painting or objet d'art. So it's only fitting that portions of a 2,000-year-old Egyptian papyrus known as "The Book of the Faiyum" belonging to institutions founded by each mogul are being displayed for the first time in 150 years in a new exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Museum . "There was this kind of early-20th-century friendly rivalry between J.P. Morgan and Henry Walters," says Julia Marciari-Alexander," the director of the Baltimore museum.
NEWS
By ARTHUR HIRSCH and ARTHUR HIRSCH,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
Barbara Reger says she believes that God created the Earth, animals, plants and, of course, woman and man, and she tells children that some scientists insist nature shows the mark of a higher power's design. This might not be worth noting but for the fact that Reger teaches biology in a public school. She is also head of the science department in a middle school in Indianapolis, one of the quiet proponents of intelligent design and creationism -- whose numbers science education experts call "troubling" and surprising -- among the ranks of public school teachers.
FEATURES
By Lou Carlozo and Lou Carlozo,Chicago Tribune | February 17, 2000
Charlie Pierce of Hutchinson High School in Kansas has taught evolution in his biology class for close to 20 years. But starting this school year, Pierce was no longer required to include evolution -- a fact that distresses him and other Kansas science teachers. "We're going back to the 1880s," Pierce said. Last summer, the Kansas Board of Education voted to remove from the state's curriculum all references to evolution, the belief that life formed over billions of years, with humans and apes sharing a common ancestor.
NEWS
By Scot T. Spencer | September 18, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's announcement this month of an investment of $1.5 billion into the state's transportation program came close on the heels of President Barack Obama's recent commitment to grow national manufacturing. Both of these efforts represent an incredible opportunity to spur an industry with real potential and bring jobs back to our shores. The Red and Purple rail lines in Baltimore and suburban Washington that Maryland plans to build are just two of many projects across the country aimed at expanding and modernizing existing public transportation systems to meet increased demand from commuters and residents.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Two Baltimore nonprofits received a $520,000 federal grant for a program to help create jobs in medical research and biotechnology. The Economic Alliance of Greater Baltimore and nonprofit BioHealth Innovation Inc. are establishing what is known as a Healthcare Regional Innovation Cluster. The initiative will support efforts to turn laboratory research into medical technologies and startup companies in the Baltimore area and Montgomery County. The groups work with institutions like the National Institutes of Health to help identify promising technologies and connect them with investors to launch new companies and create jobs.
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