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By Judy Foreman and By Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | June 10, 2005
I've heard that creatine helps build muscle. Is this true? Is it safe? Widely used by athletes, creatine supplements do help build muscle. They are believed to be safe and, unlike other performance-enhancing substances, are allowed by the International Olympic Committee, the National Collegiate Athletic Association and other major sports groups. Creatine is a natural substance found in meat and fish. "But you don't get any benefit from eating meat unless the meat is raw," said exercise physiologist William J. Evans of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.
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SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | July 23, 2006
Nice four-hit shutout by John Maine on Friday night, but I have no regrets over the Orioles trading him to the New York Mets for Kris Benson. If a young starting pitcher had to be sacrificed, and that's usually how these deals work, Maine was a good choice. I'd still rather have Daniel Cabrera, and his huge upside, in the system. If only he could find a league that had a huge strike zone. Shea Hillenbrand won't be coming to the Orioles. The Blue Jays traded him to the San Francisco Giants, which means Hillenbrand no longer will be the biggest jerk in his clubhouse.
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FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | July 14, 1998
MY SON'S buddy, Paul, walked in the front door sucking on a bottle of what looked like apple juice and, because I well know Paul's aversion to any fluids that aren't caramel-colored and carbonated, I asked what he was drinking."
NEWS
By GAILOR LARGE and GAILOR LARGE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 23, 2005
What are the benefits and/or dangers of the use of creatine? We posed your question to Dr. John Emmett, author of Turning Back the Hands of Time. He explains that creatine attracts water, so your muscles swell with water, not muscle tissue. "On the other hand," he says, "an increase in creatine in the muscle cells allows the muscle to rapidly produce more energy so the athlete can work out longer and harder, gaining more strength and actually creating more lean muscle tissue." The downside?
NEWS
By GAILOR LARGE and GAILOR LARGE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 23, 2005
What are the benefits and/or dangers of the use of creatine? We posed your question to Dr. John Emmett, author of Turning Back the Hands of Time. He explains that creatine attracts water, so your muscles swell with water, not muscle tissue. "On the other hand," he says, "an increase in creatine in the muscle cells allows the muscle to rapidly produce more energy so the athlete can work out longer and harder, gaining more strength and actually creating more lean muscle tissue." The downside?
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Christian Ewell, Bill Free, Gary Lambrecht -- and Lem Satterfield contributed to this article | August 31, 1998
Home run king Mark McGwire may have given new meaning to the term "team chemistry" with his revelation that he uses the testosterone-enhancing pill androstenedione, but the debate over use of muscle-building supplements figures to remain largely one about the powdered form.Creatine, anyone?High-profile players from all the major professional sports use it. Many college and high school athletes are trying it. Doctors, trainers and parents wonder about it.The questions center on the safety and effectiveness of creatine, a compound of three amino acids that are produced naturally in the human body to help build lean muscle mass.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 1997
Athletes looking for a nutritional supplement to give them "the edge" may have found one that actually works.A study published in the July Journal of the American Dietetic Association (JADA) is the latest in a growing array of well-controlled tests that show creatine monohydrate can benefit a very specific group of athletes. Creatine appears to help high-intensity weightlifters get a better workout. Since intense workouts trigger muscle building, creatine supplementation may ultimately lead to greater muscle bulk, although no long-term studies have shown this to be true yet.In the JADA study, 14 evenly matched, well-trained weightlifters were divided into two groups.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | July 23, 2006
Nice four-hit shutout by John Maine on Friday night, but I have no regrets over the Orioles trading him to the New York Mets for Kris Benson. If a young starting pitcher had to be sacrificed, and that's usually how these deals work, Maine was a good choice. I'd still rather have Daniel Cabrera, and his huge upside, in the system. If only he could find a league that had a huge strike zone. Shea Hillenbrand won't be coming to the Orioles. The Blue Jays traded him to the San Francisco Giants, which means Hillenbrand no longer will be the biggest jerk in his clubhouse.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
The apparent heat-related death of a Washington boy during preseason football practice shook up a lot of county sports people and made them ask the question, could it happen here?Howard County has a heat policy for athletic practices.The Board of Education and several high schools have their own weather stations, and if the heat index is between 84-93, conditions are called "code green," mandating 10-minute rest periods for athletes every 45 minutes.If the heat index is between 95-104, or "code yellow," practices bTC must include frequent water breaks, and games must have timeouts for water midway through quarters.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield | September 17, 1999
LAS VEGAS -- Oscar De La Hoya has incorporated a testosterone booster and creatine among nine different supplements into his training regimen in preparation for tomorrow night's welterweight unification title bout against Felix Trinidad.Under the supervision of nutritional expert A. Scott Connelly, De La Hoya is "using a testosterone booster that is not a steroid. It's called zinc magnesium aspertate," said Sharon Lindsey, a publicist for Metrx, a supplement manufacturer.Lindsey passed out posters depicting before and after shots of De La Hoya, looking more chiseled now as opposed to when he fought here in May.Lindsey said De La Hoya is the second boxer since heavyweight Shannon Briggs to have worked with Connelly.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and By Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | June 10, 2005
I've heard that creatine helps build muscle. Is this true? Is it safe? Widely used by athletes, creatine supplements do help build muscle. They are believed to be safe and, unlike other performance-enhancing substances, are allowed by the International Olympic Committee, the National Collegiate Athletic Association and other major sports groups. Creatine is a natural substance found in meat and fish. "But you don't get any benefit from eating meat unless the meat is raw," said exercise physiologist William J. Evans of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield | September 17, 1999
LAS VEGAS -- Oscar De La Hoya has incorporated a testosterone booster and creatine among nine different supplements into his training regimen in preparation for tomorrow night's welterweight unification title bout against Felix Trinidad.Under the supervision of nutritional expert A. Scott Connelly, De La Hoya is "using a testosterone booster that is not a steroid. It's called zinc magnesium aspertate," said Sharon Lindsey, a publicist for Metrx, a supplement manufacturer.Lindsey passed out posters depicting before and after shots of De La Hoya, looking more chiseled now as opposed to when he fought here in May.Lindsey said De La Hoya is the second boxer since heavyweight Shannon Briggs to have worked with Connelly.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
The apparent heat-related death of a Washington boy during preseason football practice shook up a lot of county sports people and made them ask the question, could it happen here?Howard County has a heat policy for athletic practices.The Board of Education and several high schools have their own weather stations, and if the heat index is between 84-93, conditions are called "code green," mandating 10-minute rest periods for athletes every 45 minutes.If the heat index is between 95-104, or "code yellow," practices bTC must include frequent water breaks, and games must have timeouts for water midway through quarters.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Christian Ewell, Bill Free, Gary Lambrecht -- and Lem Satterfield contributed to this article | August 31, 1998
Home run king Mark McGwire may have given new meaning to the term "team chemistry" with his revelation that he uses the testosterone-enhancing pill androstenedione, but the debate over use of muscle-building supplements figures to remain largely one about the powdered form.Creatine, anyone?High-profile players from all the major professional sports use it. Many college and high school athletes are trying it. Doctors, trainers and parents wonder about it.The questions center on the safety and effectiveness of creatine, a compound of three amino acids that are produced naturally in the human body to help build lean muscle mass.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 30, 1998
What do the Orioles have to say about androstenedione, the over-the-counter supplement used by Mark McGwire but banned by some sports organizations?Some raised the issue of legality, others safety. Still others wondered whether it did much good. A clubhouse sampling:Manager Ray Miller: "If it's legal, I've got no problem with it. Guys use all kinds of over-the-counter stuff. As long as Major League Baseball doesn't have a problem with it, who's to say? A guy drinks six cups of coffee before he pitches and that's OK. What's the difference with [androstenedione]
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | July 14, 1998
MY SON'S buddy, Paul, walked in the front door sucking on a bottle of what looked like apple juice and, because I well know Paul's aversion to any fluids that aren't caramel-colored and carbonated, I asked what he was drinking."
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 30, 1998
What do the Orioles have to say about androstenedione, the over-the-counter supplement used by Mark McGwire but banned by some sports organizations?Some raised the issue of legality, others safety. Still others wondered whether it did much good. A clubhouse sampling:Manager Ray Miller: "If it's legal, I've got no problem with it. Guys use all kinds of over-the-counter stuff. As long as Major League Baseball doesn't have a problem with it, who's to say? A guy drinks six cups of coffee before he pitches and that's OK. What's the difference with [androstenedione]
NEWS
August 28, 1998
The New York Times said in an editorial on Thursday, Aug. 27:A dismaying little chill blew through the red-hot home-run race between Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa last weekend, when McGwire admitted that for about a year he had been ingesting a substance called androstenedione. The over-the-counter pill is classified by the Food and Drug Administration as a nutritional supplement, and is legal under Major League Baseball's drug rules. Even so, it is banned by the National Football League and by the International Olympic Committee, which recently suspended an American shot-putter, Randy Barnes, for using it.For a lot of people, this has tainted Mr. McGwire's otherwise thrilling assault on Roger Maris' single-season record of 61 home runs, and some have even suggested, not entirely in jest, that if Mr. McGwire beats the record he should have an asterisk next to his name denoting that he did so under questionable circumstances.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 1997
Athletes looking for a nutritional supplement to give them "the edge" may have found one that actually works.A study published in the July Journal of the American Dietetic Association (JADA) is the latest in a growing array of well-controlled tests that show creatine monohydrate can benefit a very specific group of athletes. Creatine appears to help high-intensity weightlifters get a better workout. Since intense workouts trigger muscle building, creatine supplementation may ultimately lead to greater muscle bulk, although no long-term studies have shown this to be true yet.In the JADA study, 14 evenly matched, well-trained weightlifters were divided into two groups.
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