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By Bill LaHay and Bill LaHay,Universal Press Syndicate | November 18, 2006
Opening the front door to dinner guests or partygoers is one of the fun rituals of homeownership, and who doesn't want to create a little grandeur for visitors to enjoy? Even if you're not out to impress anyone, it's nice to have some wide-open spaces where people can spread out and circulate, and the most common public areas in a house - the entry, living room and great room - are often designed to offer just that opportunity. But for most of us, these "social" circumstances represent a mere fraction of the time we spend in our homes, and it doesn't make sense to create spaces that work only when entertaining.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
A painting of a confident-looking bulldog wearing a Baltimore Orioles baseball cap propped outside the artist Robert McClintock's studio bears a caption reading, "How 'bout dem O's, hon!" The artist Tom Matarazzo's hand-painted screens of the Orioles Bird, with jauntily tipped cap and grinning beak, have never been more in demand than they are this month. Steve Mull's colored-marker drawing of an Orioles team jersey, mitt and a pair of steamed crabs evokes such strong associations with the city that you can practically taste the Old Bay seasoning on those crustaceans.
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NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | November 23, 1993
A Department of Natural Resources representative told the Union Bridge Town Council last night that the department is "very interested" in creating a wetlands area on a small parcel of the property that is being subdivided and developed by Towson dentist G. Jackson Phillips.Kevin M. Smith, a mitigation supervisor, said that it is too early to tell how much of the land could be developed into a wetlands area, but preliminary tests at the site show the land has potential.Mr. Smith confirmed town officials' concerns that once the area is designated as wetlands, town use of the property would be severely limited.
SPORTS
By Sam Mellinger and The Kansas City Star | October 9, 2014
Those are the Royals over there in front of all the cameras. That's Eric Hosmer on the cover of Sports Illustrated. That's him and his teammates making the funnest kind of off-the-field news by dropping around $15,000 on a bar tab to say thank you to fans. That's James Shields starting for the third time in five playoff games for a franchise writing a brilliant, welcome and enthralling new history. And that's George Brett, off to the side - always off to the side now - thankful for it all and saying something that may surprise you. “I'm tired of talking about 1985, I really am,” he says.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | September 11, 1991
A group of county developers has become the first in the state to band together to meet state environmental requirements by creating new homes for ducks, rabbits and squirrels.With $150,000 contributed by the developers, the county's Bureau of Parks will create wetlands before the end of 1992 in Font Hill Park, a largely undeveloped area in western Ellicott City. A dam in the park broke a year ago, causingone of its two ponds to drain.The developers' money, along with a $150,000 state matching grantand another $95,000 from county bond sales, will put the 21-acre park project years ahead of schedule.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN STAFF | December 25, 1999
When Wesley Summers moved to a house in Braddock Heights three years ago, he found a hilly back yard with a dozen trees infected by gypsy moths.They were majestic 100-year-old cedars and oaks spread over 2 acres, but they had to come down.That gave Summers, a full-time electrician and part-time artist, an idea: Why not carve the wood into statues?"I had never done any carving before, but I kind of liked the idea of it," said Summers, 38.He went to work, using the chisels and chain saws that he had for chores around his house.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | December 24, 2006
Usually, when artist Mark Carson visits an elementary school for one of his stained-glass workshops, the students are given free rein to create their own designs. But at Bellows Spring Elementary School in Ellicott City last week, the students all worked together to create six themed windows, which will eventually be placed in the sunlit windows by the school's front office. "It's much more ambitious than normal," said Carson, who does artist-in-residency programs in Howard and surrounding counties.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1998
Crestar Financial Corp., one of the region's largest independent banking companies, said yesterday that it has agreed to be acquired by Atlanta-based SunTrust Banks Inc. for $9.5 billion.The deal will create the 10th-largest banking company in the country with $88 billion in assets, 3.3 million customers and 1,093 branches in six states, including Maryland, and the District of Columbia."This is going to create a powerful combination," said Richard G. Tilghman, Richmond-based Crestar's chairman and chief executive, who will retain his job and become vice chairman of SunTrust's board.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Peggy Rogers and Peggy Rogers,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 1, 2004
Little virtual people in little virtual homes, The Sims are so lifelike that players of the personal-computer game often fashion characters after themselves. Some have rewritten their own troubled childhoods and marriages. And some take their frustrations out on the little people. "Two of the most fundamental truths about people is that we love to create and we love to destroy," says Jon "PyroFalkon" Habib, who writes a free and popular strategic Sims manual posted on many Web sites.
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | March 12, 2006
Creating something new without losing a sense of the past is a recurring theme in the work of Alex Castro, the designer tapped to create the Baltimore Immigration Memorial and Liberty Garden. His own past made him a logical choice. With architect Rebecca Swanston, Castro led the team that used the curve of an old trolley barn at the foot of Federal Hill as inspiration for the swirling home of the American Visionary Art Museum. He devised a plan for combining the Charles Theatre and the Famous Ballroom on Charles Street to create an anchor for the Station North arts district, without wiping out the character of the original theater.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
They are as well-versed in 3-D printing, weaving and the anthropology of fashion as they are in classic looks from Chanel and Dior. Students in the Maryland Institute College of Art s fibers program approach fashion from an unusual perspective. Although the college does not offer a traditional fashion design curriculum, graduates are creating inventive garments informed by education rooted in a sensual - and intellectual - understanding of textiles. "Fashion is a cultural force that relates to how we communicate ideas, values, fears and aspirations, our sense of belonging, and our ideas around gender and class," said fibers department chair Valeska Populoh.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Danyette Hawkins had to employ her best diplomatic skills as she stood in front of the Grand parking garage on Paca Street holding a bright-colored flag before the game. Every few minutes, a driver would pull up to enter the garage. Hawkins would have to explain that the garage — popular among fans when the team plays at night — was still filled with daytime business parkers. Then she would wave her flag and the car would move on. Some of the fans appeared frustrated.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
What does it take to win the National Association of Home Builders' 2010 Best in American Living Awards? In the case of one particular winning home - a coastal Maryland mansion - it takes an owner with a vision and an equally qualified design visionary to make the dream a reality. Off a narrow lane on Ocean City's Assawoman Bay, Bill and Shelby Allen's three-story home sits regally at the water's edge in defiance of all elements, both natural and architectural. “I wanted a Northern Atlantic, Nantucket-style cottage - coastal [and]
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
A group of investors plans to buy commercial real estate services firm Cassidy Turley and combine it with DTZ, creating a global real estate network, Cassidy Turley said Monday. Terms of the deal, expected to close at the end of the year, were not disclosed. The combined firm, which will use the DTZ brand, represents some $2.9 billion in revenue and more than 28,200 total employees, Cassidy Turley said in a statement. The Cassidy Turley brand launched in 2010, roughly two years after four groups, including former Baltimore-based Colliers Pinkard, joined to create a larger real estate network.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
A satellite that has been hurtling toward Mars for the past 10 months slammed on the brakes Sunday night, gliding into the red planet's gravity field to spend a year studying its atmosphere - and hopefully collect evidence that Mars might once have supported life. On a mission managed from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, the MAVEN spacecraft neared completion Sunday night of a 442 million-mile journey by firing six thrusters in reverse and being pulled into Mars' gravity field.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
  Christian Siriano is going from Fashion Week to "Freak Show. " The "Project Runway" vet, who was born and raised in Annapolis and attended the Baltimore School for the Arts, will be using his keen fashion sense to judge a costume design competition tied to FX's horror-drama series "American Horror Story. " Announced today to celebrate the launch of "AHS's" fourth season, "Freak Show," the contest "invited participants with an eye for the unusual to design an original costume inspired by the series," according to a press release.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2001
When a Massachusetts biotech company recently declared that its researchers had cloned human embryos, it conjured up scary images for many people: bad science fiction movies, Hitler's twisted ambitions, rows and rows of identical humans. But, like most things in life, the truth is a lot more complicated, a lot more subtle. The announcement drew a storm of criticism. Ethicists, religious leaders and President Bush denounced Advanced Cell Technology for going too far. Scientists charged that the experiment was hyped and called it a failure.
NEWS
February 11, 1997
Kenneth "Pappy" Ford,88, who built a small mill into one of Oregon's major wood products manufacturers and helped create the Ford Family Foundation, died Saturday in Roseburg, Ore. Mr. Ford and his former wife, Hallie, created the foundation, which has donated tens of millions of dollars to schools, public agencies and charities.More obituaries on next page.Pub Date: 2/11/97
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | September 17, 2014
When former Maryland star Shawne Merriman watched the Seattle Seahawks play the Green Bay Packers earlier this month, he saw a Seahawks offense that found different, creative ways to get the ball in the hands of their top playmaker -- wide receiver Percy Harvin. The Seahawks lined Harvin up in the backfield, used Harvin as a traditional wide receiver and also put him in motion and handed him the ball on jet sweeps. In all, Harvin touched the ball 11 times. Merriman said he wants to see the Terps do more of those types of things to get the ball in the hands of wide receivers Stefon Diggs and Deon Long.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The conniving politician at the center of the Netflix drama "House of Cards" is named Frank, but he's anything but honest, forthright and direct. His wife was christened Claire - an ironic choice for a woman who always has an ulterior motive. Even the couple's surname, "Underwood," hints at their hypocrisy by echoing "underhanded. " It's costume designer Johanna Argan's job to subliminally convey that duplicity to the audience through the clothes the characters wear. "The other characters think they're getting one thing from Frank and Claire," Argan said in a phone interview.
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