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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
Opponents of a farmer's creamery business in northern Baltimore County have the right to pursue their fight against the operation before a circuit judge, the state's second highest court ruled on Wednesday. The Maryland Court of Special Appeals reversed a Circuit Court opinion, ruling that the Long Green Valley Association and John and Susan Yoder have legal standing to press their case against the dairy and meat business run by Robert E. Prigel and his family at their 199-acre farm on Long Green Road.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
Memories of the 1933 kidnapping in Baltimore of Albert Hendler, scion of the wealthy and prominent Hendler Creamery Co. family, have recently been revived in an exhibition of documents relating to the case at the Crime Museum in Washington. The nation was still jittery after the shocking nighttime kidnapping a year earlier of Charles A. Lindbergh Jr., son of aviartion hero Charles A. Lindbergh Sr. and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, from the crib of his home near Hopewell, N.J. Hendler was the son of Lionel Manuel Hendler, the founder in 1905 of the Hendler Creamery Co. in the 1100 block of E. Baltimore St. Early in 1929, the elder Hendler, who was a philanthropist, had sold his company to Borden's for 79,000 shares of Borden's stock in a deal that was estimated at the time to be worth $6 million.
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NEWS
August 26, 2007
On Aug. 23, 1893, ground was broken for the Harford Creamery on a road two miles east of Shawsville and two miles north of Madonna now called Harford Creamery Road. Machinery began churning at the creamery on Dec. 10, 1893. The boiler was known as "Old Bess." With a new plant to process milk up and running, farmers began to keep more cows. The plant at one time had 100 contributors and handled as much as 20,000 pounds of milk a day. The milk was separated from the cream and some of the cream was made into butter.
EXPLORE
Aegis report | March 19, 2013
The Harford Creamery Road bridge over Little Deer Creek in White Hall is to be replaced this year, and the construction project will result in the roadway being closed to through traffic for about five months, according to the Harford County Department of Public Works, Division of Highways and Water Resources. An exact date for construction to begin will be announced about two weeks in advance, according to the county. Detour routes will be marked prior to the start of construction.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | July 22, 2009
Bobby and Pam Prigel are moving forward with construction of a creamery on their Long Green Valley property, where they will sell organic dairy products made from milk produced by their herd at Bellevale Farms. A $250,000 low-interest loan from Baltimore County, announced Tuesday, will help them complete and equip a 10,000-square-foot pole barn on Long Green Road. "This puts the finishing touches on this project," Bobby Prigel told a gathering of officials and friends at the farm, promising to invite them back next spring for ice cream.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | May 22, 2009
A man whose efforts to open a creamery at his Long Green Valley dairy farm had been thwarted by a few neighbors emerged victorious Thursday when the Baltimore County Council passed a zoning regulation that will allow him to sell organic products from the milk his cows produce. "This bill will support the county's $300 million agricultural industry, help meet our land preservation goals and help farmers supply fresh local produce to patrons," said Chris McCollum, agriculture liaison for the county's department of economic development.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | March 8, 2009
The Yoder and Prigel families have worked for generations on adjoining dairy farms in northern Baltimore County, their cows sometimes grazing in each other's fields. Now, except for arguments made in legal proceedings, these Long Green neighbors are barely speaking, and the wrangling is taking a financial toll. "When I started this, I budgeted about $500 for legal fees," Bobby Prigel said. "I have spent well over $100,000." Their conflict centers on the creamery that Prigel has built - but has yet to open - at his Bellevale Farm and his plans to sell organic products made from the milk his cows produce.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2004
For months, Mark Haley of Jarrettsville had been driving past the "coming soon" sign on Route 543 in Bel Air, waiting for the new ice cream shop to open. Finally, on Thursday, he was able to step inside the newly opened Broom's Bloom Creamery and order a waffle cone filled with rich pecan brittle ice cream. Haley, who declared the ice cream "as good as Ben and Jerry's" joined other customers, including Gloria Montague of Bel Air and Elmer Smith of Fallston, who were enjoying scoops during the shop's second day of business.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2004
For months, Mark Haley of Jarrettsville had been driving past the "coming soon" sign on Route 543 in Bel Air, waiting for the new ice cream shop to open. Finally, on Thursday, he was able to step inside the newly opened Broom's Bloom Creamery and order a waffle cone filled with rich pecan brittle ice cream. Haley, who declared the ice cream "as good as Ben and Jerry's" joined other customers, including Gloria Montague of Bel Air and Elmer Smith of Fallston, who were enjoying scoops during the shop's second day of business.
NEWS
February 19, 1998
FireMount Airy: Firefighters responded at 12: 45 a.m. Wednesday to a barn fire in the 9500 block of Hawkins Creamery Road in Montgomery County. Units were out two hours.Pub Date: 2/19/98
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
It's a beautiful Saturday at Prigel Family Creamery. The sun shines on cows ambling over the field, while parents gaze lovingly at sticky kids squealing with delight as they lick giant scoops of ice cream. Inside the creamery, where clean-cut teenagers make ice cream floats and thick milkshakes, a board lists more than two dozen flavors of homemade ice cream. Customers peer through windows, hoping to catch a glimpse of happy cow. It's 2012, but it could just as easily be 1952. The Prigel family has been farming in the Long Green Valley area of Baltimore County for more than 100 years.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
Opponents of a farmer's creamery business in northern Baltimore County have the right to pursue their fight against the operation before a circuit judge, the state's second highest court ruled on Wednesday. The Maryland Court of Special Appeals reversed a Circuit Court opinion, ruling that the Long Green Valley Association and John and Susan Yoder have legal standing to press their case against the dairy and meat business run by Robert E. Prigel and his family at their 199-acre farm on Long Green Road.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | October 3, 2011
Who knew that Goose Feathers could slide like silk going down the throat? Or that Cow's Feet really hit the sweet spot on the tastebuds? Apparently David and Kelly Keyes of Keyes Creamery at Mt. Felix Farm found these secret ingredients and ice cream lovers in Harford County can be glad they did. Ice cream never tasted so fresh as it does scooped into a bowl or in one of their famous ice cream pies. That's because the frozen treat is made from milk harvested only during the grazing season, which makes all the difference in taste, whether it's black raspberry or cappuccino crunch.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Sun | August 9, 2009
Age: 19 Years on the job: 3 Salary: $7.75 per hour plus tips How he got started: : Jerome Henry decided to take a job at the Cold Stone Creamery while still attending Patterson High School. His older brother worked there and enjoyed it, so he thought he would give it a try. Once he graduated, the job also allowed him the flexibility to attend a massage therapist program at the Medix School in Towson. Henry recently completed the nine-month program and is preparing to take his certification exam later this year.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | July 22, 2009
Bobby and Pam Prigel are moving forward with construction of a creamery on their Long Green Valley property, where they will sell organic dairy products made from milk produced by their herd at Bellevale Farms. A $250,000 low-interest loan from Baltimore County, announced Tuesday, will help them complete and equip a 10,000-square-foot pole barn on Long Green Road. "This puts the finishing touches on this project," Bobby Prigel told a gathering of officials and friends at the farm, promising to invite them back next spring for ice cream.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | May 22, 2009
A man whose efforts to open a creamery at his Long Green Valley dairy farm had been thwarted by a few neighbors emerged victorious Thursday when the Baltimore County Council passed a zoning regulation that will allow him to sell organic products from the milk his cows produce. "This bill will support the county's $300 million agricultural industry, help meet our land preservation goals and help farmers supply fresh local produce to patrons," said Chris McCollum, agriculture liaison for the county's department of economic development.
NEWS
March 20, 2009
Creamery violates conservation pact The Baltimore Sun's article "Plans for creamery puts farmers at odds" (March 8) was generally a fair representation of the controversy. However, it failed to place this issue in the more general context of conservation easements. A legislative audit report on the Maryland Agriculture Land Preservation Foundation recently concluded that "the cumulative cost of easement acquisitions in MALPF's Annual Report ... exceeded the amount on the state's accounting records by $153 million."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | April 9, 2009
A dispute over land use among neighbors in Long Green Valley has prompted the Baltimore County Council to draft legislation to permit creameries to operate in agricultural zones. The measure, recommended by the county Planning Board and set for introduction April 20, may settle the debate, waged in court and before the council, between land preservationists who say the law would open the door to factory operations in their midst, and farmers who insist that they must diversity to stay in business.
NEWS
March 20, 2009
Creamery violates conservation pact The Baltimore Sun's article "Plans for creamery puts farmers at odds" (March 8) was generally a fair representation of the controversy. However, it failed to place this issue in the more general context of conservation easements. A legislative audit report on the Maryland Agriculture Land Preservation Foundation recently concluded that "the cumulative cost of easement acquisitions in MALPF's Annual Report ... exceeded the amount on the state's accounting records by $153 million."
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