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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | February 7, 2007
Barbara Kempisty of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for biscuits that can be made completely in the microwave. She wanted to be able to prepare the dough in advance and take it to an elderly aunt who is in assisted living and does not have a kitchen but does have access to a microwave. Hope Weiner of Rapid City, S.D., sent in a recipe for whole-wheat microwave biscuits. These biscuits are made with a combination of whole-wheat and white flour. The dough can be made in advance, and the biscuits can be made in the microwave.
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | February 7, 2007
Barbara Kempisty of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for biscuits that can be made completely in the microwave. She wanted to be able to prepare the dough in advance and take it to an elderly aunt who is in assisted living and does not have a kitchen but does have access to a microwave. Hope Weiner of Rapid City, S.D., sent in a recipe for whole-wheat microwave biscuits. These biscuits are made with a combination of whole-wheat and white flour. The dough can be made in advance, and the biscuits can be made in the microwave.
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FEATURES
October 2, 1991
This seven-minute frosting is just what Minnie Schwab o Silver Spring requested. Thanks to Harriet Seese of Aberdeen for forwarding the recipe.Seven-minute Frosting1 cup light brown sugar, packed1/3 cup water1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar2 egg whitesCombine sugar, water and cream of tartar in a heavy saucepan. Boil rapidly to 230 degrees on a candy thermometer. In a bowl, beat the egg whites until stiff. Gradually add hot sugar mixture to egg whites, beating until thick. Spread on cake in swirls.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2005
Vivian Borden from Santa Margarita, Calif., was looking for a recipe for a spongecake that is baked in the traditional angel food or tube pan. She says that many people today seem to confuse a spongecake with an angel food cake. The primary difference between the two cakes is that an angel food cake never contains egg yolks, whereas a spongecake should contain either whole eggs or a combination of yolks and beaten egg whites with the addition of a leavening agent. Jean Peterson from Independence, Ore., sent us her spongecake recipe that she has used for more than 35 years.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | January 11, 2004
I consider myself a good cook, but I'm having a problem that I can't solve. I have a fudge recipe, and for the third time in a row the fudge came out grainy. What am I doing wrong? The fact that you keep making it is a good sign that you are one determined individual. First, let's start with the recipe. I can only guess that at some point in your lifetime the recipe worked and you came out with great fudge. If that is not the case, I have a fabulous idea: Throw the recipe away. Start a roaring winter fire with it and make a clean start with a brand new recipe.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | October 22, 2003
Cream of tartar: behind the mystery Take a look at your favorite baking recipes. Chances are, one of the ingredients is cream of tartar. But what exactly is this stuff? According to a recent survey conducted by local spice maker McCormick & Co., consumers called cream of tartar the most "intimidating holiday 'spice.' " Actually, cream of tartar is a fine white powder derived from the crystalline acid that's left on the inside of wine casks once grapes have fermented. Cream of tartar helps add volume to egg whites in meringues and brings a creamier consistency to candy and frostings.
FEATURES
By Jill L. Kubatko and Jill L. Kubatko,Staff Writer | August 5, 1992
The mail bag was brimming with brown edge cookie recipes for Norma Brown of Baltimore. Many were duplicates and our food testers at the Baltimore International Culinary College chose these two. One contains cream of tartar; it was sent in with no name attached.Lillian Skidmore of Jarrettsville sent in her recipe for brown rim cookies. She says she hasn't made them in years. "When I saw the request, I thought that may be what she was looking for. I have had it on a file card for at least 30 years," she says.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | October 6, 1993
Q: As I was consuming large amounts of a French baguette the other day, I began to wonder whether flour contains any fat.A: The flour in a French baguette is generally all-purpose white flour, which is very low in fat, only 1 gram per 4 ounces. Since French baguettes are traditionally made without added shortening, butter or oil, your meal of bread was very low-fat. Something made with corn flour or brown rice flour, on the other hand, would have a higher fat content.Q: Why do my meringues sometimes shrink after being baked?
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2005
Vivian Borden from Santa Margarita, Calif., was looking for a recipe for a spongecake that is baked in the traditional angel food or tube pan. She says that many people today seem to confuse a spongecake with an angel food cake. The primary difference between the two cakes is that an angel food cake never contains egg yolks, whereas a spongecake should contain either whole eggs or a combination of yolks and beaten egg whites with the addition of a leavening agent. Jean Peterson from Independence, Ore., sent us her spongecake recipe that she has used for more than 35 years.
FEATURES
By ANNETTE GOOCH and ANNETTE GOOCH,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | May 31, 1998
What makes angel food cake so appealing to a cake love who's watching dietary fat intake is that it contains no butter, oil or egg yolks. The secret ingredient is egg whites. At only 16 calories, an egg white has zero fat but more than half the total protein of a whole egg. Still, for a cake to qualify as angel food, the whites must be properly beaten and the other ingredients carefully folded into them.The process involves first beating the whites to the foamy stage, when white "suds" start to form.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | January 11, 2004
I consider myself a good cook, but I'm having a problem that I can't solve. I have a fudge recipe, and for the third time in a row the fudge came out grainy. What am I doing wrong? The fact that you keep making it is a good sign that you are one determined individual. First, let's start with the recipe. I can only guess that at some point in your lifetime the recipe worked and you came out with great fudge. If that is not the case, I have a fabulous idea: Throw the recipe away. Start a roaring winter fire with it and make a clean start with a brand new recipe.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | October 22, 2003
Cream of tartar: behind the mystery Take a look at your favorite baking recipes. Chances are, one of the ingredients is cream of tartar. But what exactly is this stuff? According to a recent survey conducted by local spice maker McCormick & Co., consumers called cream of tartar the most "intimidating holiday 'spice.' " Actually, cream of tartar is a fine white powder derived from the crystalline acid that's left on the inside of wine casks once grapes have fermented. Cream of tartar helps add volume to egg whites in meringues and brings a creamier consistency to candy and frostings.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2001
Jeanette Shoemaker of Frederick wrote: "I would very much like to have an old-time recipe for sugar cookies, the kind that mound up when baked and are cakelike in texture. They were a favorite of an aunt of mine who is now deceased." John W. Billett of Baltimore sent in tester Laura Reiley's choice. Mam Mam's Sugar Cookies Makes about 8 dozen cookies 3 1/2 cups sugar 2 cups solid shortening 2 cups sour milk (see note) or buttermilk 5 eggs 2 teaspoons baking soda 2 teaspoons cream of tartar 8 cups all-purpose flour 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract sprinkles or raisins (optional)
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2000
Lucy Stahley of Baltimore wanted a recipe for Zucchini Pie, noting that she had heard it was great, tasted like apples, and she always had a surplus of zucchini. Her response came from Beatrice Parks of Harvard, Ill., who wrote, "We love it. Use large zucchini but still tender enough that you can pierce the skin easily with your thumbnail. Peel, cut in quarters lengthwise, remove the seeds and slice crosswise." Zucchini Pie Serves 8 4 cups (about 3 medium) zucchini sliced and steamed until tender-crisp 2 tablespoons lemon juice dash of salt 1 cup to 1 1/2 cups sugar, depending on sweetness preference 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon 1 1/2 teaspoons cream of tartar dash of nutmeg 3 tablespoons flour 1 (9-inch)
FEATURES
By Donna Deane and Donna Deane,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 31, 2000
Meringues - beautiful, light, billowy meringue pies - can be lemon, lime, chocolate, banana, rhubarb or graham cracker cream underneath, but there must be meringue on top. Many cooks are intimidated by these fluffy beauties and take the easy way out by covering their pies with whipped cream. But let's take a closer look at meringues and try to take some of the mystery out of making them. Actually, they're fast and easy to prepare if you follow a few simple tips. There are two types of meringues in these recipes.
FEATURES
By ANNETTE GOOCH and ANNETTE GOOCH,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | May 31, 1998
What makes angel food cake so appealing to a cake love who's watching dietary fat intake is that it contains no butter, oil or egg yolks. The secret ingredient is egg whites. At only 16 calories, an egg white has zero fat but more than half the total protein of a whole egg. Still, for a cake to qualify as angel food, the whites must be properly beaten and the other ingredients carefully folded into them.The process involves first beating the whites to the foamy stage, when white "suds" start to form.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2001
Jeanette Shoemaker of Frederick wrote: "I would very much like to have an old-time recipe for sugar cookies, the kind that mound up when baked and are cakelike in texture. They were a favorite of an aunt of mine who is now deceased." John W. Billett of Baltimore sent in tester Laura Reiley's choice. Mam Mam's Sugar Cookies Makes about 8 dozen cookies 3 1/2 cups sugar 2 cups solid shortening 2 cups sour milk (see note) or buttermilk 5 eggs 2 teaspoons baking soda 2 teaspoons cream of tartar 8 cups all-purpose flour 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract sprinkles or raisins (optional)
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | May 18, 1994
Q: When I'm baking, there are so many choices to be had in the fat category, even in the wrapped sticks of butter or margarine alone. What's the difference? Can I use a vegetable oil spread instead of butter in my baking?A: There are many variables -- the quantity of cream used, the quality of that cream, how much filler has been added and how much salt is used for preservative.Generally, the most reliable baking product is either unsalted butter or basic margarine. These two products have the highest content of fat and are not filled with gums or fillers that might affect the baking result in some way. While there are many reduced-fat options on the market now, because of added liquid, they won't produce satisfactory baking results as easily.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1998
For Brunswick stew and mayonnaise cake recipes, you've landed in the right spot.Joy Lipscomb of Fayetteville, N.C., wrote that she would "really like to find a recipe for Brunswick stew which is the kind made with barbecue and chicken as well as vegetables."The response from Diane C. Meilinggaard of Sparks was full of information about the stew: "It is a favorite dish down South, especially in North and South Carolina and Georgia where I, the original Georgia Peach, am from. My mother and grandmother made this stew with leftover beef and/or pork and added a fresh hen. I have always made mine with fresh ingredients, but leftovers work great.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1997
How about a cake and pie day? These two will offer a sweet TC treat and maybe even some early thoughts about the holidays.An eggnog coffee cake was the request of Christine A. Sefton of Woodstock, Ill., who wrote that the recipe was once printed on the Borden's eggnog container and "it was our family favorite."Lois Skovran of Rapid City, S.D., responded.Skovran's eggnog coffee cake1 1/3 cup sugar1/2 cup margarine2 eggs3 cups all-purpose flour3 teaspoons baking powder2 cups eggnogPreheat oven to 350 degrees.
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