Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCream Of Crab
IN THE NEWS

Cream Of Crab

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | August 12, 2009
I didn't realize how many people love cream of crab soup until my Top 10 on the subject last Tuesday. Please go to my blog at baltimoresun.com/diningatlarge to get many more suggestions of readers' favorite places to get this delicacy. Here's my list in alphabetical order: 1 Carrol's Creek in Annapolis. Rich and lump-filled but not too thick 2 Catonsville Gourmet in Catonsville. Cream of crab and corn chowder 3 Gertrude's in the BMA. With lump crab and "scented with sherry" 4 Grille 700 in the Marriott Waterfront.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2012
Karen Russell from Bryan, Texas, was looking for a recipe for cream of crab soup similar to the one she had at a restaurant in Chestertown when visiting the area a few years ago. Cream of crab is a popular menu item at restaurants all around the Chesapeake Bay region and is as ubiquitous here as clam chowder is along the coast of New England. Recipes for the soup are plentiful, but the best versions are the simple, straightforward ones that allow the sweet and succulent meat from local blue crabs to shine.
Advertisement
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1998
Soup. It's a comfort food. Crabs, if you're from Maryland, are a necessity. And cream of crab soup on a chilly autumn afternoon, well, that's paradise. But only if it has the right consistency, aroma, flavor, texture and a great deal of crab meat.Recently, some members of the Anne Arundel Bureau staff took an unscientific, partially blind taste test (one restaurant's soup came in bowls with its logo on the side) of cream of crab soups from four North County restaurants that were recommended by staffers or boast of having the best cream of crab soup.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
Marylanders love their crabs — especially when the meat is picked and mixed with cream, cheese, mayo and Old Bay. And while crabs are generally not an unhealthy choice right out of the shell, one serving of a crab dish can pack a third or more of the total recommended daily intake of fat, sodium and calories once the meat is drowned in fatty oils and salt. Area waters in which they are harvested can also mean pollutants. As with any treat, nutritionists say, moderation is key. And when consumers do indulge, an obvious choice is the broiled crab cake that isn't doused in tartar sauce or other goopy toppings.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 26, 1997
GOOD CRAB-SOUP makers can be slippery. Ask them to share their secrets and they might give you a recipe that "accidentally" leaves a few steps out. Sometimes they talk freely. But later you find yourself scratching your head and wondering whether what they told you made any sense.That is what happened when I asked probing questions of some of the region's top crab-soup makers. I grilled the soup makers at Peerce's Plantation, Wayne's Bar-B-Que, Windows at the Renaissance hotel and Bistro 300 at the Hyatt hotel.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 11, 2000
THREE different prize-winning crab soups, three different secrets of success. That is what I heard after quizzing the winners of a crab-soup contest, the annual Old Bay Soup Stakes held last Wednesday at Harborplace in the noonday sun. One chef said his secret was roasted red peppers, another winner said his was using crabs with lots of mustard in them, and a third said the key ingredient was cabbage. Two groups - the foodies and the sipping public - judged the soups. They spooned down soups that 17 area restaurants had entered in two categories: the vegetable-based red crab soup and the white cream of crab.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | October 31, 1999
THE WORLD of crab soup is divided into two camps, red and white. Those in the red camp believe crab soup should have a tomato base, contain more vegetables than your average backyard garden and have a judicious amount of spice, a prodigious amount of crab meat and occasionally some shell.I have heard this crab soup called by several names, among them "traditional Maryland vegetable," "the working man's crab soup," "home-style crab soup" and "the real stuff."Those in the white-soup camp advocate a crab soup made with fresh stock, more cream than your average cow and gorgeous lumps of crab meat.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 18, 1998
SHORTLY AFTER Ismael Gutierrez, chef at Baltimore's Capitol City Brewing Co., won first place in the cream of crab division of the Old Bay Crab Soup Stakes, I asked him if he had used any "secret" ingredients.He said he had. It was a jalapeno pepper. Gutierrez said that near the end of the soup-making process he had dropped finely diced pieces of the fiery pepper into the mixture."It gives the soup a hint of spiciness," Gutierrez said, "and pulls the flavors together."While many Marylanders would roll their eyes at the notion of putting such a south-of-the-border flavor into a Mid-Atlantic mainstay, folks who sipped the soup liked the results of the union.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1997
From Buffalo, N.Y., came a request for a cream of crab soup and from Baltimore, a request for a hummingbird cake."I often visit relatives in Maryland, and I absolutely love the cream of crab soup. No one here has the recipe. Can you help?" wrote Geraldine Serba of Buffalo. Her answer came from Henriette Harmon of Severna Park, who noted that "this recipe is good and is from 'Maryland's Way,' the Hammond-Harwood cookbook."She added another note. "Fred's Restaurant on Solomon's Island Road in Parole serves the best cream of crab soup I've ever eaten, but they won't share the recipe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | November 20, 2008
Roy's Kwik Korner 1002 S. Crain Highway, Glen Burnie; 410-768-3369 Open 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Wednesday, 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursday-Friday, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday Tucked on a corner between busy stretches of Quarterfield Road and Crain Highway, Roy's is a spot for eaters on the move. Motorists roll in, grab their grub and roll on. The sweet perfume of steamed seafood washed over me when I walked in the door. By the time I got to the "order here" sign, I was craving crab soup. I ordered two bowls, one red and one white.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | August 12, 2009
I didn't realize how many people love cream of crab soup until my Top 10 on the subject last Tuesday. Please go to my blog at baltimoresun.com/diningatlarge to get many more suggestions of readers' favorite places to get this delicacy. Here's my list in alphabetical order: 1 Carrol's Creek in Annapolis. Rich and lump-filled but not too thick 2 Catonsville Gourmet in Catonsville. Cream of crab and corn chowder 3 Gertrude's in the BMA. With lump crab and "scented with sherry" 4 Grille 700 in the Marriott Waterfront.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | November 20, 2008
Roy's Kwik Korner 1002 S. Crain Highway, Glen Burnie; 410-768-3369 Open 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Wednesday, 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursday-Friday, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday Tucked on a corner between busy stretches of Quarterfield Road and Crain Highway, Roy's is a spot for eaters on the move. Motorists roll in, grab their grub and roll on. The sweet perfume of steamed seafood washed over me when I walked in the door. By the time I got to the "order here" sign, I was craving crab soup. I ordered two bowls, one red and one white.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
Catonsville has one of those downtowns that looks like it's barely changed in the past 50 years or so. Most of the stores and restaurants are still locally owned, and they crowd against one another along both sides of Frederick Road. Every year since 1946, the street is closed off for a Fourth of July parade of twirlers, marching bands, veterans, politicians and floats. One place that has changed -- while staying true to Catonsville's character -- is the Ships Cafe and Sports Bar, purchased by Catonsville natives Jim and Sharon Andrews three years ago. The couple -- he's a retired Baltimore County cop, she was in the banking business -- added light and space to an existing bar, converting the 1865 building next door into a sunny dining room with a crab deck up top for when the weather's nice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 13, 2003
On Valentine's Day, or any other day, what could be more romantic than afternoon tea in a centuries-old building on a cobblestoned Annapolis street? Everything about the Reynolds Tea Room is gentle and soothing, from the soft jazz to the mild, yellow cream of crab soup served with a swirl of sherry. The scones, quiches and soft crustless sandwiches can be nibbled right from the fingertips of one hand, so it's easy for you and your significant other to hold hands across the white tablecloth while you eat. The tearoom, which opened in November, exudes a Colonial charm fitting for a building that has been around since 1747.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2002
Elsie Plummer of Baltimore wrote: "I am looking for a good cream of crab soup recipe and if anyone has one, I'd love to have it." Evelyn Picker of Arbutus responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. The recipe Picker responded with is from the Relay Elementary School PTA Anniversary cookbook from Debbie Massimini. Recipe requests Alice Richards of Rohnert Park, Calif., wants to recover a recipe she treasured many years ago. "I read your column in the Press Democrat of Rohnert Park. I want a hot-milk spongecake recipe like that printed on the outside of a Swans Down cake-flour box that was discontinued.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | October 16, 2002
DOES CRAB SOUP taste better in cooler weather? As is true with many matters swirling around crab soup, there are contradictory theories on this one. Lining up in the cold-weather-is-better camp is Tim Mullen, executive chef of the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel. When the temperature drops, sales of cream of crab soup at the hotel's Windows restaurant shoot up, Mullen told me. He called the inverse relationship between falling temperatures and rising soup sales a "study in degree and demand."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Richardson and Cameron Barry and David Richardson and Cameron Barry,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 2000
It's only a 30-minute ride from our house near Towson to River Watch in Essex, but, as we drove past open fields, marinas and tiny old riverfront cottages, we felt as if we were going on vacation. We have no idea what River Watch is like when the weather is cold, but it's a fine spot when you can eat outside on the restaurant's big deck under an awning, and watch the boats come and go on Middle River. The food's good, too. That's not always the case when a restaurant can get by on views alone.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2002
Elsie Plummer of Baltimore wrote: "I am looking for a good cream of crab soup recipe and if anyone has one, I'd love to have it." Evelyn Picker of Arbutus responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. The recipe Picker responded with is from the Relay Elementary School PTA Anniversary cookbook from Debbie Massimini. Recipe requests Alice Richards of Rohnert Park, Calif., wants to recover a recipe she treasured many years ago. "I read your column in the Press Democrat of Rohnert Park. I want a hot-milk spongecake recipe like that printed on the outside of a Swans Down cake-flour box that was discontinued.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 10, 2001
HOW DO YOU tweak a classic? That is the question about a dozen area chefs wrestled with last week as they prepared their entries for the annual Old Bay Crab Soup Stakes at Harborplace. Both the white cream of crab soup and its red vegetable-laden cousin are sacrosanct dishes in many Maryland homes. Recipes are passed down, like family silver, from generation to generation. Restaurant chefs, however, can be more adventuresome with crab soup. They can play with conventional recipes; they can think beyond the same old formula.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 11, 2000
THREE different prize-winning crab soups, three different secrets of success. That is what I heard after quizzing the winners of a crab-soup contest, the annual Old Bay Soup Stakes held last Wednesday at Harborplace in the noonday sun. One chef said his secret was roasted red peppers, another winner said his was using crabs with lots of mustard in them, and a third said the key ingredient was cabbage. Two groups - the foodies and the sipping public - judged the soups. They spooned down soups that 17 area restaurants had entered in two categories: the vegetable-based red crab soup and the white cream of crab.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.