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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | April 25, 2007
Will this crab town take a liking to crayfish? I wondered about this recently as I watched a batch of Louisiana crayfish wiggle around in their temporary home, the kitchen of Ethel and Ramone's restaurant in Baltimore's Mount Washington neighborhood. A typical reaction of a Marylander to a mass of quivering crayfish (also called crawfish or crawdads) might be the one displayed by Ava Bloom. She screamed and ran away. Ava is 4 years old and the daughter of Ed Bloom, the restaurant's chef.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2007
The rusty crayfish, a mud critter with extra large claws, has sneaked across the Mason-Dixon line from Pennsylvania into a pair of northern Maryland streams, where biologists worry that the invasive species will kill native fish and plants. State wildlife managers are tracking the southward creep of what some call the "king" of all crawdaddies down the Monocacy River in Frederick County and Conowingo Creek in Cecil County. Officials at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources think that the crayfish - often used as bait - are hitchhiking in the buckets of fishermen.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2007
The rusty crayfish, a mud critter with extra large claws, has sneaked across the Mason-Dixon line from Pennsylvania into a pair of northern Maryland streams, where biologists worry that the invasive species will kill native fish and plants. State wildlife managers are tracking the southward creep of what some call the "king" of all crawdaddies down the Monocacy River in Frederick County and Conowingo Creek in Cecil County. Officials at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources think that the crayfish - often used as bait - are hitchhiking in the buckets of fishermen.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | April 25, 2007
Will this crab town take a liking to crayfish? I wondered about this recently as I watched a batch of Louisiana crayfish wiggle around in their temporary home, the kitchen of Ethel and Ramone's restaurant in Baltimore's Mount Washington neighborhood. A typical reaction of a Marylander to a mass of quivering crayfish (also called crawfish or crawdads) might be the one displayed by Ava Bloom. She screamed and ran away. Ava is 4 years old and the daughter of Ed Bloom, the restaurant's chef.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | May 21, 2006
Jay Kilian and Ron Klauda hope anglers take the bait this season. Take it home. Take it to the trash. Take it to a neighbor who's going fishing the next day. Do anything with their leftover bait but toss it in the water. For the past several years, the two biologists have watched helplessly as one former bait bucket resident has made itself at home in Maryland waters, taking over turf previously held by native stock. At nearly 6 inches long, the virile crayfish is both edible and a dandy bait.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | August 12, 1994
Anew Cajun and Creole restaurant, Fat Lulu's, opened a couple of weeks ago at 1818 Maryland Ave. Eventually you'll be able to get dinner and a show there, but right now the management is concentrating on the kitchen, which is turning out shrimp gumbo, chicken jambalaya, Bourbon Street trout, blackened catfish with Louisiana crayfish sauce, red beans and rice with ham hocks, and crayfish pie. Entrees are priced from $9 to $16. Manager Eugene Jones promises "good...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Photo essay by Jack Eisenberg and Photo essay by Jack Eisenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 2003
I used to take longer bicycle rides than I do now, all the way from Paper Mill Road, just above Ashland where the Northern Central Railroad Trail begins, to the state line. I love it up there. My favorite place is Phoenix, where the trail passes a wooden staircase that leads down to the Gunpowder River. Like Monet at Giverny, I keep coming back to this spot, where I always experience a great sense of renewal. One winter day just below Sparks, I came upon two elderly ladies who remembered taking the train to school during the Depression.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | May 29, 1994
I managed to get away from work a little early one afternoon last week and forget my worries by casting around a familiar farm pond outside of Hampstead. Pond fishing is red hot right now.The pond I fished covers maybe 1 1/2 acres and is pretty typical of many Carroll County farm ponds. It was loaded with fat bluegills, hungry largemouth bass and a resident grass carp or two. Casting is relatively unobstructed. A cold, spring-fed stream runs into the pond, cattail stands provide bass cover.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | September 6, 2002
Fishing report The locations Piney Run: Channel cats are providing the action now, says Loren Lustig at the park office. Fish are running 2-4 pounds, with a bigger one occasionally tipping the scales. Cut bait and chicken livers will do the trick. Hydrilla beds are limiting shore action, so you're best off in a boat. Michael Anthony Orr of Finksburg received a state citation for his 8.8-pound, 28 1/2 -inch channel cat. Bass fishing has slowed from its frantic summer pace. Small plastics and spinnerbaits are the best choices.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | March 17, 1991
"Everything here that looks nice, we built it," 8-year-old Cole Ingram says proudly."The place looked like a dump (before.) We planted the dogwoods, my mother's garden, the bamboo by the road."Cole is talking about the 100-foot-wide wooded area just beyond the stream that runs through his backyard in Burleigh Manor.For the past three years, it has been a magical place. There's a frog pond there and a "wild turkey, rabbits, turtles, snakes, and crayfish" -- just about everything an 8-year-old could hope for.There are things that please adults, too -- bird feeders, a terraced walk through an ivy garden, a wooded bridge across a meandering creek, a log-lined path through the woods.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | May 21, 2006
Jay Kilian and Ron Klauda hope anglers take the bait this season. Take it home. Take it to the trash. Take it to a neighbor who's going fishing the next day. Do anything with their leftover bait but toss it in the water. For the past several years, the two biologists have watched helplessly as one former bait bucket resident has made itself at home in Maryland waters, taking over turf previously held by native stock. At nearly 6 inches long, the virile crayfish is both edible and a dandy bait.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Photo essay by Jack Eisenberg and Photo essay by Jack Eisenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 2003
I used to take longer bicycle rides than I do now, all the way from Paper Mill Road, just above Ashland where the Northern Central Railroad Trail begins, to the state line. I love it up there. My favorite place is Phoenix, where the trail passes a wooden staircase that leads down to the Gunpowder River. Like Monet at Giverny, I keep coming back to this spot, where I always experience a great sense of renewal. One winter day just below Sparks, I came upon two elderly ladies who remembered taking the train to school during the Depression.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | September 6, 2002
Fishing report The locations Piney Run: Channel cats are providing the action now, says Loren Lustig at the park office. Fish are running 2-4 pounds, with a bigger one occasionally tipping the scales. Cut bait and chicken livers will do the trick. Hydrilla beds are limiting shore action, so you're best off in a boat. Michael Anthony Orr of Finksburg received a state citation for his 8.8-pound, 28 1/2 -inch channel cat. Bass fishing has slowed from its frantic summer pace. Small plastics and spinnerbaits are the best choices.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | August 12, 1994
Anew Cajun and Creole restaurant, Fat Lulu's, opened a couple of weeks ago at 1818 Maryland Ave. Eventually you'll be able to get dinner and a show there, but right now the management is concentrating on the kitchen, which is turning out shrimp gumbo, chicken jambalaya, Bourbon Street trout, blackened catfish with Louisiana crayfish sauce, red beans and rice with ham hocks, and crayfish pie. Entrees are priced from $9 to $16. Manager Eugene Jones promises "good...
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | May 29, 1994
I managed to get away from work a little early one afternoon last week and forget my worries by casting around a familiar farm pond outside of Hampstead. Pond fishing is red hot right now.The pond I fished covers maybe 1 1/2 acres and is pretty typical of many Carroll County farm ponds. It was loaded with fat bluegills, hungry largemouth bass and a resident grass carp or two. Casting is relatively unobstructed. A cold, spring-fed stream runs into the pond, cattail stands provide bass cover.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | March 17, 1991
"Everything here that looks nice, we built it," 8-year-old Cole Ingram says proudly."The place looked like a dump (before.) We planted the dogwoods, my mother's garden, the bamboo by the road."Cole is talking about the 100-foot-wide wooded area just beyond the stream that runs through his backyard in Burleigh Manor.For the past three years, it has been a magical place. There's a frog pond there and a "wild turkey, rabbits, turtles, snakes, and crayfish" -- just about everything an 8-year-old could hope for.There are things that please adults, too -- bird feeders, a terraced walk through an ivy garden, a wooded bridge across a meandering creek, a log-lined path through the woods.
NEWS
By THE BALTIMORE ZOO | February 6, 2002
Otters love the water ... but are equally at home on land. Some species of otter, like the Sea otter, rarely come on land. Otters' long hair is water-repellent, and their long, thin bodies and webbed paws make them excellent swimmers. Since their ears and nostrils close under water, otters hunt for food using their paws and whiskers. what's for DINNER? Otters eat frogs, crayfish, crabs and fish. DO YOU KNOW How do otters talk to each other? Answer: Otters use different sounds and scents to mark their territory.
SPORTS
By Lonny Weaver and Lonny Weaver,Special to The Sun | July 23, 1995
The time is ideal for wet wade fishing of area streams for smallmouth bass and native trout. In fact, I have a number of such trips marked on my calendar throughout the next month. Local hot spots include Big Pipe Creek, the Monocacy River, Piney Creek, plus the mid and upper portions of the Potomac River, as well as the south and north branches of the Patapsco River.When I am lucky enough to fish a weekday, my longtime favorite has been various wadable areas of the Potomac from Brunswich upstream to Hancock.
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