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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
Word got to me that Jayne Vieth was introducing a Wednesday night $20 crawfish boil at Henninger's last night. So I went down to Upper Fells Point and tried it. Lip-smacking good. My cyborg friends finished all of their crawfish, shrimp, corn and potatoes, but I didn't' come close. Henninger's -- I've said on record that it's one of my favorite restaurants. And the fact is that I'm not anonymous there.  Henninger's isn't one of your flashier places. Menu additions arrive glacially.
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SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2012
In an instant, Ravens return specialist Jacoby Jones lost his grip on the football and his job security. During the AFC divisional playoff game between the Houston Texans and the Ravens in January, things went awry for Jones in what became his final game with the Texans. Jones became a relative pariah in Houston after he muffed a first-quarter punt that led to a Ravens touchdown. He later fumbled another punt in that game, which ended in a Texans loss. Fans took their frustrations with Jones to message boards and Twitter, demanding the Texans get rid of him. They got their wish in May, when the Texans cut Jones after trade rumors surrounded him during the NFL draft.
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NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | July 24, 2006
People zipping off to work early on a summer morning might notice the beat-up station wagon parked by a skinny stretch of trees in Woodlawn. What they probably won't see is the burly man ducking into the woods with an empty bucket and a net strung between wood poles. "Soon as you walk in these woods, you're going to see things you're not going to believe," says Ed Sonn, 57, a retired construction worker who visits this spot four times a week in warm weather. As he walks down a dirt path, Sonn points out raccoon prints and deer tracks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
Word got to me that Jayne Vieth was introducing a Wednesday night $20 crawfish boil at Henninger's last night. So I went down to Upper Fells Point and tried it. Lip-smacking good. My cyborg friends finished all of their crawfish, shrimp, corn and potatoes, but I didn't' come close. Henninger's -- I've said on record that it's one of my favorite restaurants. And the fact is that I'm not anonymous there.  Henninger's isn't one of your flashier places. Menu additions arrive glacially.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | October 24, 1993
There was no way the fifth-graders from Abingdon Elementary School were going to touch the crawfish they found at the Harford Glen Environmental Education Center.Wearing black rubber boots up to their knees, Terrell Tyson and Lamanda Hinks, both 10, found the crawfish during a search of a stream at Harford Glen, at 502 W. Wheel Road off Route 24 in Bel Air.It's one thing, the girls explained, to scoop up a crawfish using a long-handled net and pop it in a collection bucket and quite another to touch it with bare hands.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | April 25, 2007
Will this crab town take a liking to crayfish? I wondered about this recently as I watched a batch of Louisiana crayfish wiggle around in their temporary home, the kitchen of Ethel and Ramone's restaurant in Baltimore's Mount Washington neighborhood. A typical reaction of a Marylander to a mass of quivering crayfish (also called crawfish or crawdads) might be the one displayed by Ava Bloom. She screamed and ran away. Ava is 4 years old and the daughter of Ed Bloom, the restaurant's chef.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | July 5, 1998
The granddaddy of Baltimore brew pubs, which was also the city's first Cajun restaurant, recently lost the chef and part-owner who put it on the map. Bill Aydlett left Sisson's because he'd had enough of the restaurant business, at least for a while. He passed on his pots and pans to a former sous chef, Bill Rothwell, who had also worked at Pierpoint and the Oregon Grille.Pretty fancy for a scruffy little Federal Hill bar. Of course, Baltimoreans know Sisson's is more than that; but walk into the dim, noisy, crowded bar and you'd never guess there's a pleasant little dining room in back where you can get crawfish spring rolls with a mango dipping sauce or salmon fillet with a smoked salmon and horseradish crust and warm fennel potato salad.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,Special to the Sun | August 5, 1999
If the idea of a casual '30s-era supper club appeals to you, check out Copeland's of New Orleans. Slip into a spacious booth as a pianist romances the two-level dining room with a medley of jazz classics. The glossy, inlaid-pattern tables, the deco trim illuminated in pink lights, the cozy darkness of the cigar bar, the Mardi Gras masks in the entry -- it's hard to look anywhere and not find wonderfully rich details in the place. What makes that even more surprising is that Copeland's is a restaurant chain, with 25 locations south of the Mason-Dixon Line, and a dozen more under construction.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1999
Copeland's, a New Orleans-based chain restaurant that opened recently in Annapolis, boasts that it serves "the ultimate New Orleans experience." That isn't too far from the truth.My mother and father are from Baton Rouge, La., so I'm familiar with the state's cuisine, and Copeland's does New Orleans and the Bayou State justice.From the outside, the two-story building looks more like the Taj Mahal than a restaurant. Inside, it's equally ornate with vaulted ceilings, fan-shaped relief motifs on the walls, and cherry-wood paneling around the dining area.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2012
In an instant, Ravens return specialist Jacoby Jones lost his grip on the football and his job security. During the AFC divisional playoff game between the Houston Texans and the Ravens in January, things went awry for Jones in what became his final game with the Texans. Jones became a relative pariah in Houston after he muffed a first-quarter punt that led to a Ravens touchdown. He later fumbled another punt in that game, which ended in a Texans loss. Fans took their frustrations with Jones to message boards and Twitter, demanding the Texans get rid of him. They got their wish in May, when the Texans cut Jones after trade rumors surrounded him during the NFL draft.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | April 25, 2007
Will this crab town take a liking to crayfish? I wondered about this recently as I watched a batch of Louisiana crayfish wiggle around in their temporary home, the kitchen of Ethel and Ramone's restaurant in Baltimore's Mount Washington neighborhood. A typical reaction of a Marylander to a mass of quivering crayfish (also called crawfish or crawdads) might be the one displayed by Ava Bloom. She screamed and ran away. Ava is 4 years old and the daughter of Ed Bloom, the restaurant's chef.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | July 24, 2006
People zipping off to work early on a summer morning might notice the beat-up station wagon parked by a skinny stretch of trees in Woodlawn. What they probably won't see is the burly man ducking into the woods with an empty bucket and a net strung between wood poles. "Soon as you walk in these woods, you're going to see things you're not going to believe," says Ed Sonn, 57, a retired construction worker who visits this spot four times a week in warm weather. As he walks down a dirt path, Sonn points out raccoon prints and deer tracks.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | July 21, 2006
When you're standing calf-deep in cool, clear Cattail Creek on a sweltering July morning, you somehow absorb a sense of a time in Howard County when there was no air conditioning, and the pace of life naturally slowed. Before you know it, you're bending to pick up rocks in hopes of finding a crawdad. You're poised to swish a net in the water and see if you can scoop up a fish before it rides the ripple around the bend. Welcome to the summer educational farm tour, "Ponds, Puddles and Creeks" at Sharp's at Waterford Farm in Brookeville.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,Special to the Sun | August 5, 1999
If the idea of a casual '30s-era supper club appeals to you, check out Copeland's of New Orleans. Slip into a spacious booth as a pianist romances the two-level dining room with a medley of jazz classics. The glossy, inlaid-pattern tables, the deco trim illuminated in pink lights, the cozy darkness of the cigar bar, the Mardi Gras masks in the entry -- it's hard to look anywhere and not find wonderfully rich details in the place. What makes that even more surprising is that Copeland's is a restaurant chain, with 25 locations south of the Mason-Dixon Line, and a dozen more under construction.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1999
Copeland's, a New Orleans-based chain restaurant that opened recently in Annapolis, boasts that it serves "the ultimate New Orleans experience." That isn't too far from the truth.My mother and father are from Baton Rouge, La., so I'm familiar with the state's cuisine, and Copeland's does New Orleans and the Bayou State justice.From the outside, the two-story building looks more like the Taj Mahal than a restaurant. Inside, it's equally ornate with vaulted ceilings, fan-shaped relief motifs on the walls, and cherry-wood paneling around the dining area.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | July 5, 1998
The granddaddy of Baltimore brew pubs, which was also the city's first Cajun restaurant, recently lost the chef and part-owner who put it on the map. Bill Aydlett left Sisson's because he'd had enough of the restaurant business, at least for a while. He passed on his pots and pans to a former sous chef, Bill Rothwell, who had also worked at Pierpoint and the Oregon Grille.Pretty fancy for a scruffy little Federal Hill bar. Of course, Baltimoreans know Sisson's is more than that; but walk into the dim, noisy, crowded bar and you'd never guess there's a pleasant little dining room in back where you can get crawfish spring rolls with a mango dipping sauce or salmon fillet with a smoked salmon and horseradish crust and warm fennel potato salad.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | May 19, 1991
It's not a bad way to spend a day at work.Rebecca Dorsey's working wardrobe includes T-shirts and shorts, and her "office" is a 35-acre farm, studded with ponds and ringed by woods, on the Eastern Shore. She can take her dog to work, too: Shad, a chocolate Labrador retriever, dives with gusto in and out of the ponds, and tries to entice a visitor into a game of stick-toss.It was a balmy, sunny Wednesday in May when a reporter drove down a country lane near Cambridge to the Pyramid crawfish farm.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | July 21, 2006
When you're standing calf-deep in cool, clear Cattail Creek on a sweltering July morning, you somehow absorb a sense of a time in Howard County when there was no air conditioning, and the pace of life naturally slowed. Before you know it, you're bending to pick up rocks in hopes of finding a crawdad. You're poised to swish a net in the water and see if you can scoop up a fish before it rides the ripple around the bend. Welcome to the summer educational farm tour, "Ponds, Puddles and Creeks" at Sharp's at Waterford Farm in Brookeville.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | October 24, 1993
There was no way the fifth-graders from Abingdon Elementary School were going to touch the crawfish they found at the Harford Glen Environmental Education Center.Wearing black rubber boots up to their knees, Terrell Tyson and Lamanda Hinks, both 10, found the crawfish during a search of a stream at Harford Glen, at 502 W. Wheel Road off Route 24 in Bel Air.It's one thing, the girls explained, to scoop up a crawfish using a long-handled net and pop it in a collection bucket and quite another to touch it with bare hands.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | July 28, 1993
Eh, mon ami, just wait till you taste this feast! There'll be creamy crawfish Monica, sizzling red beans and rice, jumping hot jambalaya, traditional Southern fried chicken and spicy Cajun chicken wings, alligator sausage, pralines and cafe au lait -- in fact, all the things that make the traditional foods of New Orleans so popular, and it's all right here at home.On Saturday, Festival New Orleans rolls into Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia with music, crafts and food. There'll be three stages of continuous sounds, crafts people selling beads and jewelry, voodoo dolls and other Louisiana crafts, plus half a dozen food vendors, all creating the sights and smells and sounds of New Orleans.
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