Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCraving
IN THE NEWS

Craving

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | February 2, 2003
Have you ever heard of eating orange peel? After almost every meal, especially after eating something sweet, I get a craving for orange peel. It seems to satisfy some unknown dietary need in my body. Is orange peel toxic in any way? Could craving it be a sign of a hidden deficiency in my diet or a psychological habit I have acquired? I hope you can help me solve this mystery, since none of the doctors I have consulted has known the answer. Orange peels might be treated with fungicides or other chemicals to help improve shelf life.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun and By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Swimmers describe the race as a snarling beast that will rob them of the energy needed for other endeavors. The greatest of all time, Michael Phelps, says he'll never swim it again. Too painful. You'll hear no such talk, however, from Bel Air native Chase Kalisz. For the 20-year-old Kalisz, the 400-meter individual medley is "my baby. " Phelps will garner most of the attention Friday as he swims the 100-meter butterfly, his marquee race of the Phillips 66 National Championships.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | May 23, 2004
I need help. Twenty years ago, I developed a craving for cornstarch during my second pregnancy. It disappeared with the birth of my son. I thought that was the end of it, but some years later it returned for no apparent reason. It was pure torture, because I could not stop myself from eating it once I'd begun again. I never suffered from significant weight gain or constipation, but I felt that it was unhealthy. My solution was to find something to replace the cornstarch, and I found crushed ice to be a good substitute.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 9, 2013
I was standing in line with God, buying tickets to see "Monsters University. " He's a big Billy Crystal fan. "So," I said, "have you heard about these religious atheists?" God gave me a look. "Is this a joke?" He asked. "No," I said. "It's a story that ran in the Washington Post recently about religion in America. It was fascinating. Turns out 12 percent of those who say they don't believe in you nevertheless pray. Some of them pray to something they call a 'universal spirit.' It also said 18 percent of atheists say religion has some importance in their lives.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 13, 1992
A medication called naltrexone promises to revolutionize the treatment of alcoholism, two groups of researchers have independently found. The drug is said to reduce an alcoholic's craving for liquor.Use of the medication, in combination with conventional behavioral therapy, reduced relapses into alcoholism from the normal 50 percent of patients to only 20 percent, according to reports that are to appear tomorrow in the Archives of General Psychiatry.The medication also made it easier for alcoholics who relapsed into drinking while on the program to return to abstinence, said psychiatrist Joseph Volpicelli of the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2000
Adam Carton eats an average of 14 burritos a week. It's a diet for success. Carton, 31, is the owner of Frisco Burritos, a California-style Mexican restaurant with locations in Towson and now Columbia. He's also one of the restaurants' best customers. "I love being able to eat burritos all the time," Carton said. The business has brought Carton more than just a few free meals. Though he did not disclose sales figures for either of his stores, Carton said sales at the Towson store grew about 28 percent after the first year, 11 percent after the second year and another 26 percent the year after that.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith James and Meredith James,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2003
Once last call is announced, the bands pack up and DJs stop spinning, there are few late-night (or is it early-morning?) activities out there. Whether to kick off an early start or to wind down a crazy night, diners remain the epicenter of all-hours culture for many folks. These around-the-clock eateries have long occupied a place in America's heart; they've been featured in television favorites Happy Days and Seinfeld and in the movie Grease. The popularity of diners in Baltimore has been depicted in Barry Levinson's classic film Diner and his TV show Homicide: Life on the Street.
NEWS
By ROBERT LEE HOTZ and ROBERT LEE HOTZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 3, 2006
For America's 6 million compulsive gamblers, the long odds are on a pill. In the largest clinical study of its kind, researchers at the University of Minnesota found that daily doses of an experimental drug called nalmefene, often used to treat alcoholism, appeared to curb the craving to gamble, according to research published this week. The new research represents the latest effort to control the biology of misbehavior at a time when celebrity poker, online gambling, lotteries and sports betting have helped to make obsessive wagering a national psychiatric disorder.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2004
Blanche is a sex-craving, man-hungry, glamorous vamp from Atlanta. And I'm not from Atlanta. -- Former Golden Girls star Rue McClanahan
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | October 19, 2006
The wide-avenued East Baltimore community of Highlandtown is a cheap eater's paradise, offering something for nearly every culinary craving. Options range from the renowned Matthew's Pizza for Italian to yummy Chicken Rico for Peruvian-style roasted birds to Eastern House for Greek and Eichenkranz for German. Poor:]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | June 11, 2013
Ask a native son to write a love letter to Maryland and among her many virtues, Old Bay will surely be extolled. We local folk are fiercely prideful about the quirky bits of living in our state that encompass the saying, "It's just a Maryland thing. " We relish the exclusivity of a select few oddities that make our state great. At the same time, we love introducing outsiders to our traditions and lifestyles. On the short list of items that makes a person feel home here in the Old Line State, Old Bay gives most us the greatest warm and fuzzies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 1, 2013
Stanley Levy from Baltimore was in search of the recipe for the cheesy potato casserole that he enjoyed at a Cracker Barrel restaurant in Pennsylvania. He said it reminded him of macaroni and cheese but instead of pasta it was made with potatoes. A search of the Cracker Barrel website did not yield any recipes, so I contacted the company's office of corporate communications outside Nashville. Tenn., and described the dish that Levy was seeking. They thought that in all likelihood it was the popular hash brown casserole.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
Josh Asper is hungry; most wrestlers are. But Asper's appetite leans less toward pizza than perfection on the mat. The Maryland senior craves an NCAA title this week, and his drive to win has awed his teammates. During workouts, they shy away from pairing off with Asper, a Hereford alum who is ranked No. 2 in the country at 174 pounds. "Nobody likes to drill with him because he goes 110 percent," said the Terps ' Jimmy Sheptock, twice an Atlantic Coast Conference champ.
NEWS
By Michael Hill | January 24, 2013
As a longtime fan of bicycle racing - I was on the finish line in Paris in 1986 when Greg LeMond became the first American to win the Tour de France - I followed Lance Armstrong's career with intense excitement as he took cycling from the wings to center stage in his country's sport consciousness. That said, it became clear that while his story of cancer survival was compelling and inspiring, Mr. Armstrong was not a pleasant person. He was selfish and self-centered. But so are many athletes.
EXPLORE
By Andrew Conrad | December 12, 2011
It is said that when it comes to exercise, you get out what you put in. And for some women in Howard County, 20 minutes on the treadmill simply doesn't produce satisfactory returns. For these women, a workout means attacking a giant tire with a sledgehammer, lifting heavy barbells over their heads, or even grappling and throwing punches with workout partners. These adrenaline junkies have found their fix at gyms that cater to those who crave intense workouts. Howard Magazine checked out a couple of gyms in Columbia, and this is what we found.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | September 6, 2009
Like most NFL defensive tackles, Haloti Ngata has an insatiable appetite. The 6-foot-4, 345-pound Ravens lineman loves to devour Italian food (except during the season when he tries to keep healthy), anything with curry and his latest favorite - Maryland steamed crabs. At Glen Burnie's Seaside Restaurant, Ngata will go through a dozen of the largest crabs without breaking a sweat. If you try to interrupt him, the affable Ngata has been known to strike a glare that would make Kansas City Chiefs running back Larry Johnson shudder, showing he has become a true Baltimore guy. "When he's eating crabs, you don't really get many words out of him," said his wife of two years, Christina.
SPORTS
By Bill Lyon and Bill Lyon,Philadelphia Inquirer | October 17, 1990
PHILADELPHIA -- He was an oak, and she was a willow.He plants himself in front of the net on the hockey rink, tall and strong and unyielding, and defensemen pry and prod and poke at him. But that is like trying to uproot a stump that has been in the ground a long, long time. Tim Kerr will not be budged. They slash and whack at him -- men with no teeth and mean intentions -- but they cannot move him.Naturally, then, when bulldozers are used in vain, when dynamite won't work, what is called for is a woman.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 15, 1997
Baltimore needs one state university with Towson's campus, Coppin's hoopsters, UB's name, Morgan's heritage, UMBC's research and UMAB's professional schools.D6Or keep them where they are and declare them one.If the University System of Maryland were serious, it would run buses between the campi.There's little wrong with College Park that can't be improved by redistributing its 10,000 least qualified undergraduate students to other state institutions craving them.Pub Date: 12/15/97
ENTERTAINMENT
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | April 23, 2009
All the recession talk on TV got you down? Need a break from all the gloom-and-doom on the cable channels and their shouting, arm-waving, spittle-flicking financial gurus? Sure you do. So tune in at 9 tonight to MPT's Eatin' Crabcakes: The Best I Ever Had, which chronicles a rollicking road trip in search of "Crabcake Heaven." It's part of the station's Chesapeake Bay Week programming. OK, maybe you can't even afford a crab cake these days. But you can live vicariously through host and "crab cake connoisseur" Doug Roberts, who sampled crab cakes from downtown Baltimore to the back roads of the Eastern Shore, not to mention a church in Annapolis and a restaurant in Washington.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | January 19, 2009
Please help me. I am 35 years old and have been addicted to Argo Corn Starch for the past four years. How can I stop eating it? It makes my mouth dry and my limbs cramp. I have mood swings and have gained weight. But just knowing I shouldn't eat starch is not enough. Please see a doctor and ask to be tested for iron or zinc deficiency. Pica, compulsively eating a substance that is not food, is frequently associated with such a mineral deficiency and often goes away when the deficiency is corrected.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.