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By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
2500 B.C.: The earliest evidence of oyster harvesting - shell deposits called middens - indicate that people living in the Chesapeake region were eating oysters and other shellfish as long as early as 2,500 B.C. 1600s: Early colonial settlers frequently remark on the size and quantity of oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Oysters were likely harvested using boats, rakes and by wading into shallow water to simply gather them. 1700s: Around 1700, oyster harvesters began using tongs to retrieve oysters from the water.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
2500 B.C.: The earliest evidence of oyster harvesting - shell deposits called middens - indicate that people living in the Chesapeake region were eating oysters and other shellfish as long as early as 2,500 B.C. 1600s: Early colonial settlers frequently remark on the size and quantity of oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Oysters were likely harvested using boats, rakes and by wading into shallow water to simply gather them. 1700s: Around 1700, oyster harvesters began using tongs to retrieve oysters from the water.
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NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2002
NEW YEAR, new oyster. Learn to say Crassostrea ariakensis. You will hear much about this Asian bivalve in the next year or two as a savior of the Chesapeake Bay -- also as a major threat. With overharvest and disease having reduced the native Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, to a remnant population, the ariakensis oyster indeed looks attractive. It resembles the native bay oyster, tastes as good, grows twice as fast and is highly resistant to MSX and Dermo, the two diseases plaguing C. virginica.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2002
NEW YEAR, new oyster. Learn to say Crassostrea ariakensis. You will hear much about this Asian bivalve in the next year or two as a savior of the Chesapeake Bay -- also as a major threat. With overharvest and disease having reduced the native Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, to a remnant population, the ariakensis oyster indeed looks attractive. It resembles the native bay oyster, tastes as good, grows twice as fast and is highly resistant to MSX and Dermo, the two diseases plaguing C. virginica.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2000
Scientists in Virginia want to test oysters from Asia in open waters of Chesapeake Bay as part of an effort to restore the state's decimated shellfish industry. Maryland officials are leery of the proposal, fearing it could loose another foreign species in the bay. "We would support the research that might come out of it," says Carolyn Watson, an assistant secretary for natural resources in Maryland. "But it scares us to think that they may be moving out with an effort to put exotic oysters in the bay as opposed to restoring native oysters."
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2001
Maryland's watermen are looking to Virginia's experiments with Asian oysters to help revive their own flagging shellfish industry, and making environmentalists and Maryland officials a little nervous, fearing the effects of another foreign species in the bay. Scientists from the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences began testing the oysters, which have been genetically altered so they can't reproduce, in open bay waters a year ago. Now, the Maryland watermen...
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2001
IS IT TIME to throw in the towel on the bay as we have always known it, to consider importing a new and (maybe) improved ecosystem to help the troubled estuary recover? Such decisions seem possible after an informal meeting of a few dozen watermen, scientists and environmental managers last week in Annapolis. They gathered to see a creature named Crassostrea ariakensis, the Suminoe oyster, native to China, Japan, India, Pakistan and other coastal nations of Southeast Asia. Virginia has been experimenting since 1996 with ariakensis, a cousin to our bay's native Crassostrea virginica.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2005
In a move to slow down the state's plans to introduce Asian oysters into the Chesapeake Bay, a local environmentalist has filed a petition with the federal government asking that the native oyster be designated an endangered or threatened species. Dieter Busch, a Crownsville environmental consultant, wrote the National Marine Fisheries Service last week asking the federal agency to protect the native oyster from a foreign introduction that he fears could result in its extinction. Despite a recent rebound in some areas, the native oyster harvests throughout the Chesapeake Bay are a fraction of what they were a decade ago because of disease and overharvesting.
NEWS
April 9, 2002
THIS YEAR'S CHESAPEAKE oyster harvest was spectacularly bad. It was the second worst on record, and it marked the 15th year since Maryland's oyster stocks first collapsed. Official Maryland policy is to foster a tenfold increase in the bay's oyster population, but this year the numbers just kept heading downward. Because of the drought the bay became more salty, and because of the salt two particularly nasty oyster parasites flourished. This year's haul of oysters in Maryland amounted to 120,000 bushels, barely a third of last year's miserable total.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer Staff writer Tom Horton contributed to this article | October 24, 1993
There's no place like home, or so it seems when Pacific oysters try living in the Chesapeake Bay.They resist disease but don't thrive in the estuary, which is warmer and less salty than the ocean.The Japanese oysters simply refuse to grow.The evidence comes from the lower bay, where the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) is experimenting with them.A batch placed at the mouth of the York River over the summer is warding off the parasites that ravage the bay's native shellfish.But the growth problem throws cold water on the idea that transplanted Japanese oysters might be the saviors of the Chesapeake shellfish industry.
NEWS
By David A. Fahrenthold and The Washington Post | March 24, 2010
The first time there was a war over the Chesapeake Bay's oysters - in the 1800s - it started because there were so many of the shellfish. For a share of the fortune on the bay's floor, watermen fought police and one another with rifles and cannons. This year's oyster war is being fought with cell phones, glow sticks, fast boats and night-vision technology, but for the opposite reason.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2005
COLLEGE PARK - In the quiet of Kennedy T. Paynter Jr.'s University of Maryland laboratory, Asian and native oysters live together in small tanks - breathing oxygen and eating algae as little blennies dart by hunting for food. Though all seems calm, the research conducted in this tucked-away lab is at the forefront of an increasingly vigorous debate over whether Maryland should put Asian oysters into the Chesapeake Bay. Ever since Maryland announced its intent last year to restore the bay's once-bountiful oyster population by introducing a species native to China, scientists have scrambled to learn about crassostrea ariakensis.
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