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NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | September 29, 2006
Yes, say researchers who study the berry, although the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, which is sponsoring several clinical trials, says the data is "not conclusive." The queen of cranberry science, Amy Howell, an associate research scientist at Rutgers University in Chatsworth, N.J., said that, overall, research suggests that eight to 10 ounces a day of cranberry juice cocktail drink, sweetened with either sugar or artificial sweetener, have been shown clinically to reduce urinary tract infections by 50 percent.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | April 1, 2014
Fells Point corner establishment Todd Conner's has been around for a number of years and up to this point, never registered on my radar as a place that had a cocktail list. To be fair, it does, in fact, have one. But it's fairly new so it's my fault for not stopping by more often. I'll take my punishment later - no time like the present to enjoy some recently created, frequently rotating libations courtesy of the ol' Todd. Todd Conner's new-ish cocktail program is spearheaded by bartender Paull ("with two Ls")
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FEATURES
By Mary Carroll and Mary Carroll,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | December 3, 1995
There's nothing dull or unfestive about low-sugar desserts. Simple flavors predominate but are still rich-tasting: fruit and berries, sauces of red or white wines, tangy lemon and orange zest, spices like cinnamon and nutmeg -- all sweet-tooth satisfying without being overly sugary.Simplest are poached winter fruits. Pears, tart apples, dried apricots and dates simmered in strong-flavored liquid taste heavenly and slightly exotic. Wine and grape juice are my favorite poaching mediums. Since much of the alcohol in wine cooks off within 10 minutes, calories in wine-poached fruit are minimal.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | May 4, 2009
Breast cancer runs in my family. My mother had it first, and I was diagnosed six years ago. Mine was estrogen receptor positive, so I avoid sources of estrogen. Last year, I read that some sunscreens have estrogenic activity. Is this true? I would like to know for my own safety and for my daughters and granddaughters. They will be slathering on sunscreen all summer long. I'd like to know which ingredients could be a problem and which are safe. It comes as a shock to many people that some chemicals in sunscreens can be absorbed into the body (Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, April 2008)
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2003
There are times when cranberries have a hard time finding a place at the table. Not as holiday season approaches. This time of year, no feast is complete without them. But why confine cranberries to the table? These little berries pack enough flavor to liven up feast-day beverages at least as merrily as they complement the turkey and trimmings. Cranberry juice now comes in two colors. The traditional red has been joined by white cranberry juice, which is pressed from berries harvested a few weeks before they turn crimson.
NEWS
January 13, 2006
I read about a new drug that affects the body's cannabinoid receptors. It is supposed to curb appetite, lower cholesterol and block glucose. Are you familiar with this drug? My doctor and I steer clear of typical diet drugs even though I am overweight (6 feet 3 inches and 285 pounds) because they raise blood pressure and I am pre-hypertensive. Rimonabant (Acomplia) is a weight-loss drug awaiting approval from the Food and Drug Administration. The manufacturer, Sanofi-Aventis, hopes that it will get the green light to market this prescription medicine this year.
FEATURES
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | December 20, 1998
Cranberries can enliven menus with their ruby sheen and clean, astringent flavor any time of year. Still, most of us relate them to dishes of the winter holidays. As Christmas approaches, cranberries will be on holiday menus everywhere, and not just as a dinner side dish.Stir some coarsely chopped fresh or frozen berries or a handful of the sweetened dried fruit into pancake, muffin or quick bread batter; or knead some into bread dough. Give apple crisp, cobbler or pie a rosy hue and tart taste by replacing up to half the amount of apples called for with cranberries.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | October 26, 2003
The continuing bad news about hormone replacement therapy has me upset. Can you clear up another question for me? The news has focused on the dangers of estrogen plus progestin for older women. What about the danger to younger women taking the same hormones as birth control pills? Are our daughters at risk from using birth control pills that contain estrogen and progestin? Most birth control pills are combinations of estrogen and progestin, not that different from postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT)
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2003
With the arrival of fall, life's pace seems to quicken. Vacations are over, classes have begun and folks are back at work. This is the time to get out the crockpot. And Pillsbury's Slow Cooker Recipes (Clarkson Potter, 2003, $19.95) has 140 recipes that show you how to use it. The beauty of cooking with a slow cooker is tossing a few ingredients in the pot in the morning before leaving home and returning to dinner that evening. Pillsbury recognizes this, so the book doesn't fuss with a lot of ingredients or hands-on preparation.
FEATURES
By Bill Burton | November 28, 1990
Tired of leftover Thanksgiving turkey? How about a different bird, say a plump Canada goose?The trick is to cook the goose just enough. As with all game, when overcooked it becomes tough, dry and tasteless. It doesn't have the natural fat of barnyard poultry.The bird should be cooked to a golden brown, maybe blackened just a bit in splotches. Probe it with a fork or knife, and if it seems tender and juicy, it's done.You can compensate for the lack of natural fat in a goose when roasting by laying strips of bacon or salt pork over the breast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | October 5, 2006
Cosmopolitan Bar and Grill This brightly colored bar in Canton Square serves up about 70 different martinis. Downstairs is a bar with a small dining area and upstairs is a dance floor and second bar. Where -- 2933 O'Donnell St. Call -- 410-563-5000 Web site -- liberatores.com (it's owned by the same company) Notable -- The two most popular martinis are the Espresso Martini, a mix of vanilla vodka, Baileys Irish Cream, Kahlua and a splash of espresso, and the Ultimate Cosmo, made from Grey Goose Orange vodka, Cointreau and splashes of lime and cranberry juice.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | September 29, 2006
Yes, say researchers who study the berry, although the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, which is sponsoring several clinical trials, says the data is "not conclusive." The queen of cranberry science, Amy Howell, an associate research scientist at Rutgers University in Chatsworth, N.J., said that, overall, research suggests that eight to 10 ounces a day of cranberry juice cocktail drink, sweetened with either sugar or artificial sweetener, have been shown clinically to reduce urinary tract infections by 50 percent.
NEWS
January 13, 2006
I read about a new drug that affects the body's cannabinoid receptors. It is supposed to curb appetite, lower cholesterol and block glucose. Are you familiar with this drug? My doctor and I steer clear of typical diet drugs even though I am overweight (6 feet 3 inches and 285 pounds) because they raise blood pressure and I am pre-hypertensive. Rimonabant (Acomplia) is a weight-loss drug awaiting approval from the Food and Drug Administration. The manufacturer, Sanofi-Aventis, hopes that it will get the green light to market this prescription medicine this year.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN FOOD EDITOR | November 24, 2004
The turkey is chilling in the refrigerator; the crisper and pantry shelves are overflowing. One day to go until your Thanksgiving feast. By now, you have a good idea who'll be sitting at the dining-room table and what they'll be eating. But what about the beverages? There's still time to dash off to the liquor store to pick up the wine and drop by the grocery store (express lane only) to pick up the mixers if you need them. Depending on whether you're serving two or 10, whether it's an adult-only or family affair, you have a number of beverage options.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | January 25, 2004
I use a French press coffee maker, which in my opinion makes a superior cup of coffee. A friend said that brewing coffee this way will raise my cholesterol, so I should pour the coffee through a paper filter (like the ones in drip coffeepots). This seems silly, but my cholesterol is a little high. Would this make a difference? The way coffee is brewed might affect cholesterol levels. After debating this issue for decades, scientists have concluded that coffee made in a percolator or with grounds in a pot (cowboy-style)
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 2003
Holiday parties feature foods and drinks that aren't necessarily known for their healthful qualities. But with a little imagination and some innovation, it's possible to come up with some beverages that are festive, unusual and even somewhat more healthful than the usual concoctions. Herbal teas are a good example. We usually drink them all on their own, but they also can make a good base for a tasty punch. Almost any herbal tea will work. Just make a strong brew, sweeten to your taste - or not - and add some other flavors - a fruit juice or two, along with something fizzy like ginger ale or even club soda.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | October 5, 1994
Chicken is nearly always a sure bet, whether your dinner companions are kids, company or finicky eaters. We can never have enough recipes for the most convenient cut -- the low-cal boneless, skinless breast. This rendition yields a deep-flavored glazed sauce dotted with sweet raisins, crunchy almonds and fresh scallion tops.This dish is one of those that improves as it ages for a day. You may want to make it ahead for a dinner during the week or even double the batch and enjoy the savory leftovers.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | January 25, 2004
I use a French press coffee maker, which in my opinion makes a superior cup of coffee. A friend said that brewing coffee this way will raise my cholesterol, so I should pour the coffee through a paper filter (like the ones in drip coffeepots). This seems silly, but my cholesterol is a little high. Would this make a difference? The way coffee is brewed might affect cholesterol levels. After debating this issue for decades, scientists have concluded that coffee made in a percolator or with grounds in a pot (cowboy-style)
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2003
There are times when cranberries have a hard time finding a place at the table. Not as holiday season approaches. This time of year, no feast is complete without them. But why confine cranberries to the table? These little berries pack enough flavor to liven up feast-day beverages at least as merrily as they complement the turkey and trimmings. Cranberry juice now comes in two colors. The traditional red has been joined by white cranberry juice, which is pressed from berries harvested a few weeks before they turn crimson.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | October 26, 2003
The continuing bad news about hormone replacement therapy has me upset. Can you clear up another question for me? The news has focused on the dangers of estrogen plus progestin for older women. What about the danger to younger women taking the same hormones as birth control pills? Are our daughters at risk from using birth control pills that contain estrogen and progestin? Most birth control pills are combinations of estrogen and progestin, not that different from postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT)
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