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Craig Venter

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By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,SUN REPORTER | January 25, 2008
He raced the government to map the human genome - and tied. He deciphered the genetic code for the fruit fly, the mouse and even his pet poodle, Shadow. And he has sailed around the world, collecting water samples in order to map the genomes of aquatic organisms. So yesterday's announcement that J. Craig Venter, 61, had reached a major benchmark in the quest to synthesize artificial life came as little surprise to those familiar with his work. "He's a fascinating person because he doesn't fit into the typical mold of the scientist," said Aravinda Chakravarti, the director of the Center for Complex Disease Genomics at the Johns Hopkins University.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,SUN REPORTER | January 25, 2008
He raced the government to map the human genome - and tied. He deciphered the genetic code for the fruit fly, the mouse and even his pet poodle, Shadow. And he has sailed around the world, collecting water samples in order to map the genomes of aquatic organisms. So yesterday's announcement that J. Craig Venter, 61, had reached a major benchmark in the quest to synthesize artificial life came as little surprise to those familiar with his work. "He's a fascinating person because he doesn't fit into the typical mold of the scientist," said Aravinda Chakravarti, the director of the Center for Complex Disease Genomics at the Johns Hopkins University.
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BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2005
Francis H.C. Crick, the late scientist who helped discover the "double helix" structure of DNA that led to a Nobel Prize and a renaissance within the field of molecular biology, was not - to Al Seckel's dismay - a pack rat. Years ago, Crick had given away a manuscript detailing his DNA work to a scientist living in Wales, who in turn sold it to a San Francisco doctor for $2,000. That news floored Seckel when he found out a decade ago. "The thing was probably worth about a quarter of a million," he said yesterday when contacted in California.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Sindya N. Bhanoo and Chris Emery and Sindya N. Bhanoo,SUN REPORTERS | June 29, 2007
Scientists at a Rockville biotechnology institute say they have completely replaced the DNA of one bacterium with that of another, effectively changing its species. The experiment could open the door to production of artificial organisms whose original genetic material is replaced entirely by man-made DNA, the researchers said. That way, they believe, they can program bacteria to produce useful metabolic products, such as new biofuels. Critics said the experiment raises concerns about the unknown risks of artificial organisms and the emerging science is too loosely regulated.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1993
Human Genome to go publicHuman Genome Sciences Inc., a Rockville company associated with The Institute for Genomic Research, plans to go public with the sale of 2.25 million common shares worth about $31 million.Gaithersburg-based TIGR a not-for-profit company involved in gene sequencing and analysis, was formed by Dr. J. Craig Venter, a scientist formerly at the National Institutes of Health. In exchange for providing TIGR with about $85 million in funding over 10 years, Human Genome acquired rights to inventions and patents arising from TIGR's research.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1994
* The Johns Hopkins University announced that Steve H. Hanke, a professor of applied economics, has accepted the sub-Cabinet post of state councilor on monetary and financial issues for Lithuania.* Chesapeake Ranch Water Co. has placed its Plant No. 4 on line to serve the Chesapeake Ranch Estates in Lusby, Calvert County.Trade Organizations* National Stone Association elected Bernard L. Grove, president of Genstar Stone Products of Hunt Valley, chairman.* American Association of Occupational Health Nurses announced that Jane Johnson joined its staff as senior specialist, professional affairs.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1998
A genomics research venture being launched in Rockville by Perkin-Elmer Corp. and J. Craig Venter will be named Celera Genomics Corp., Perkin-Elmer said yesterday.The company's name was derived from the word celerity, which means swiftness.Perkin-Elmer also named a panel of scientists and genetics experts to a six-member advisory board for Celera yesterday. They include a Nobel laureate, Dr. Richard J. Roberts, who will chair the board. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine in 1993.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2004
In the Region Court rejects challenge to Aetna lawsuit settlement A federal appeals court has rejected a challenge to Aetna's $170 million settlement of class action litigation with physicians. In a decision filed Friday and made public yesterday, the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta upheld the settlement's approval by the U.S. District Court in Miami last fall. The settlement ended 4-year-old class action lawsuits in which doctors alleged that Aetna had systematically denied, delayed or reduced claims payments.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2005
J. Craig Venter - whose celebrated work in genomics has led him to be compared to Charles Darwin, Dr. Frankenstein and even God - is at it again. Despite the dismal outcome of his first foray into the business world - he was ousted as chief executive officer of Celera Genomics Group, a company he founded - the scientist announced yesterday that he is giving commercialization another go, launching a second company with Nobel Prize winner and longtime friend...
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Sindya N. Bhanoo and Chris Emery and Sindya N. Bhanoo,SUN REPORTERS | June 29, 2007
Scientists at a Rockville biotechnology institute say they have completely replaced the DNA of one bacterium with that of another, effectively changing its species. The experiment could open the door to production of artificial organisms whose original genetic material is replaced entirely by man-made DNA, the researchers said. That way, they believe, they can program bacteria to produce useful metabolic products, such as new biofuels. Critics said the experiment raises concerns about the unknown risks of artificial organisms and the emerging science is too loosely regulated.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2005
Francis H.C. Crick, the late scientist who helped discover the "double helix" structure of DNA that led to a Nobel Prize and a renaissance within the field of molecular biology, was not - to Al Seckel's dismay - a pack rat. Years ago, Crick had given away a manuscript detailing his DNA work to a scientist living in Wales, who in turn sold it to a San Francisco doctor for $2,000. That news floored Seckel when he found out a decade ago. "The thing was probably worth about a quarter of a million," he said yesterday when contacted in California.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2005
J. Craig Venter - whose celebrated work in genomics has led him to be compared to Charles Darwin, Dr. Frankenstein and even God - is at it again. Despite the dismal outcome of his first foray into the business world - he was ousted as chief executive officer of Celera Genomics Group, a company he founded - the scientist announced yesterday that he is giving commercialization another go, launching a second company with Nobel Prize winner and longtime friend...
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | April 17, 2005
YOU ALWAYS said your boss was a maniac. Now experts back you up. John D. Gartner, Johns Hopkins assistant professor of psychiatry, believes U.S. business is replete with leaders whose brains are just a few dopamine molecules shy of earning them a label from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. That's a good thing, he says. In his new book, The Hypomanic Edge: The Link Between (A Little) Craziness and (A Lot of) Success in America, Gartner argues that the benefits delivered by exuberant, driven, slightly nutso entrepreneurs outweigh the numerous drawbacks.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2004
In the Region Court rejects challenge to Aetna lawsuit settlement A federal appeals court has rejected a challenge to Aetna's $170 million settlement of class action litigation with physicians. In a decision filed Friday and made public yesterday, the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta upheld the settlement's approval by the U.S. District Court in Miami last fall. The settlement ended 4-year-old class action lawsuits in which doctors alleged that Aetna had systematically denied, delayed or reduced claims payments.
BUSINESS
By Jill Kiersky and Jill Kiersky,MORNINGSTAR.COM | October 27, 2002
Do the biotechnology stocks of 2002 really look like the Internet stocks of 2000? Biotech stock prices went through the roof from 1998 to 2001 as investors thought those companies were going to cure cancer any day. They haven't, the so-called biotech bubble has burst, and company valuations have been slashed in half in the span of nine months. The two most watched biotech indexes, the Amex Biotech Index and the Nasdaq Biotech Index, are down nearly 50 percent this year. Does that mean now is a good time to get into biotech stocks?
BUSINESS
August 6, 1998
A genomics research venture being launched in Rockville by Perkin-Elmer Corp. and J. Craig Venter will be named Celera Genomics Corp., Perkin-Elmer said yesterday.The company's name was derived from the word celerity, which means swiftness.Perkin-Elmer also named a panel of scientists and genetics experts to a six-member advisory board for Celera yesterday. They include a Nobel laureate, Dr. Richard J. Roberts, who will chair the board. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine in 1993.
BUSINESS
By Jill Kiersky and Jill Kiersky,MORNINGSTAR.COM | October 27, 2002
Do the biotechnology stocks of 2002 really look like the Internet stocks of 2000? Biotech stock prices went through the roof from 1998 to 2001 as investors thought those companies were going to cure cancer any day. They haven't, the so-called biotech bubble has burst, and company valuations have been slashed in half in the span of nine months. The two most watched biotech indexes, the Amex Biotech Index and the Nasdaq Biotech Index, are down nearly 50 percent this year. Does that mean now is a good time to get into biotech stocks?
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | April 17, 2005
YOU ALWAYS said your boss was a maniac. Now experts back you up. John D. Gartner, Johns Hopkins assistant professor of psychiatry, believes U.S. business is replete with leaders whose brains are just a few dopamine molecules shy of earning them a label from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. That's a good thing, he says. In his new book, The Hypomanic Edge: The Link Between (A Little) Craziness and (A Lot of) Success in America, Gartner argues that the benefits delivered by exuberant, driven, slightly nutso entrepreneurs outweigh the numerous drawbacks.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1994
* The Johns Hopkins University announced that Steve H. Hanke, a professor of applied economics, has accepted the sub-Cabinet post of state councilor on monetary and financial issues for Lithuania.* Chesapeake Ranch Water Co. has placed its Plant No. 4 on line to serve the Chesapeake Ranch Estates in Lusby, Calvert County.Trade Organizations* National Stone Association elected Bernard L. Grove, president of Genstar Stone Products of Hunt Valley, chairman.* American Association of Occupational Health Nurses announced that Jane Johnson joined its staff as senior specialist, professional affairs.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1993
Human Genome to go publicHuman Genome Sciences Inc., a Rockville company associated with The Institute for Genomic Research, plans to go public with the sale of 2.25 million common shares worth about $31 million.Gaithersburg-based TIGR a not-for-profit company involved in gene sequencing and analysis, was formed by Dr. J. Craig Venter, a scientist formerly at the National Institutes of Health. In exchange for providing TIGR with about $85 million in funding over 10 years, Human Genome acquired rights to inventions and patents arising from TIGR's research.
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