Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCraig Claiborne
IN THE NEWS

Craig Claiborne

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Robin Copper Benzle and Robin Copper Benzle,Contributing Writer | July 11, 1993
Innocently opening my icebox to get a glass of juice one day, I started to analyze the contents of my refrigerator. I decided that if a complete stranger looked in there, he would be able to tell a lot about me.He would know, for instance, that I liked hot food (seven bottles of Matouk's Hot Pepper Sauce from Trinidad). He would know that I'm somewhat of a pack rat (a dozen tiny containers filled with leftovers). He would surely know I had children (an empty milk carton, an ice cube tray with one cube in it)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By ALETA WATSON and ALETA WATSON,SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | June 28, 2006
Julia Child, James Beard and New York Times critic Craig Claiborne may have introduced America to the wonders of great food in the 1960s, but Gael Greene was the hip young writer who chronicled Manhattan's culinary coming of age. Her breezy, irreverent restaurant reviews in the glossy pages of upstart New York Magazine were a must-read for would-be gourmands who yearned to sup among the rich and powerful. For nearly four decades, Greene has covered the food revolution from the front lines.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 22, 1994
It would be an exaggeration to say that Georgia Corso bought all her cookbooks at yard sales. But only a slight one.She did buy "The Pie Book" by Louis P. De Govy at a bookstore. And her mother gave her a copy of "The American Woman's Cookbook" as a wedding present. But most of the 500 or so books and pamphlets on cooking that fill five shelves in her Northeast Baltimore home came, in one way or another, from yard sales.The authors of these works range from well-known cooking experts such as Craig Claiborne, to questionable culinarians such as NBC weatherman Willard Scott, to home cooks such as those on the cookbook committee of St. Francis of Assisi School.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 22, 1994
It would be an exaggeration to say that Georgia Corso bought all her cookbooks at yard sales. But only a slight one.She did buy "The Pie Book" by Louis P. De Govy at a bookstore. And her mother gave her a copy of "The American Woman's Cookbook" as a wedding present. But most of the 500 or so books and pamphlets on cooking that fill five shelves in her Northeast Baltimore home came, in one way or another, from yard sales.The authors of these works range from well-known cooking experts such as Craig Claiborne, to questionable culinarians such as NBC weatherman Willard Scott, to home cooks such as those on the cookbook committee of St. Francis of Assisi School.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | September 15, 1992
An article in yesterday's Sun about sushi in Japan referred to "the late Craig Claiborne." The New York Times reports that its noted food writer "is very much alive."The Sun regrets the error.TOKYO -- The Japanese have been eating sushi since before the French had champagne and certainly centuries before the development of the crab cake -- to mention only two delights whose proper ingredients can cause national debate.In this century, the Japanese have made sushi their defining national dish, put restaurants that serve nothing else on every city street corner and battled European environmentalists who said it endangered the Atlantic bluefin tuna.
NEWS
By ALETA WATSON and ALETA WATSON,SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | June 28, 2006
Julia Child, James Beard and New York Times critic Craig Claiborne may have introduced America to the wonders of great food in the 1960s, but Gael Greene was the hip young writer who chronicled Manhattan's culinary coming of age. Her breezy, irreverent restaurant reviews in the glossy pages of upstart New York Magazine were a must-read for would-be gourmands who yearned to sup among the rich and powerful. For nearly four decades, Greene has covered the food revolution from the front lines.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | April 12, 2006
Christopher Kimball is a reluctant advocate of lighter eating. His history -- I met him 22 years ago when he was throwing a New York soiree honoring James Beard, Craig Claiborne and Julia Child -- is that of a full-flavor guy. If you go Christopher Kimball is to discuss and sign The Best Light Recipe at 7 p.m. today at Barnes & Noble, the Avenue at White Marsh, 8123 Honeygo Blvd. Call 410-933-9670.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | June 17, 2000
WORD ARRIVED that Edward Obrycki, once one of Baltimore's best-known restaurateurs and seafood kings, died May 26 in Melbourne, Fla., where he had retired in 1977. In the Baltimore of the 1960s and '70s, his rowhouse bar and crab house at Pratt and Regester streets, across from the Gold Meadow ice cream plant, near the Yoo-Hoo bottling works and Hagel's bakery, was a huge destination. Many persons thought the steamed crabs here (available only in season) were the best in Baltimore, a tall claim if there ever there was one in a town full of local preferences.
NEWS
By Carol Olten and Carol Olten,Copley News Service | March 1, 1992
In today's hectic world, we all dream of a quiet spot, a cozy getaway or a peaceful garden where we can lock the madness away and be alone with our own thoughts and the people we love best. A book on outdoor design can help even the humblest abode achieve these fantasylike qualities."A Vineyard Garden: Ideas From the Earth for Growing, Cooking and Entertaining" by Molly Chappellet; Viking Studio Books; 291 pages; $40.The Chappellets and their five children left Los Angeles and moved to California's Napa Valley more than 20 years ago to seek a richer life in a rural environment.
NEWS
October 16, 1996
Pierre Franey, 75, the French chef who became the "60-Minute Gourmet," died early yesterday.Best known for the quick-cooking column and his 20-year collaboration with Craig Claiborne of the New York Times, Mr. Franey became ill while traveling from France aboard the Queen Elizabeth II. He was treated by the ship's doctor and entered the hospital in Southampton, N.Y., when the ship docked Monday. He apparently suffered a stroke.He was born in Tonnerre, France, and moved to the United States in 1939 to work at the restaurant at the French pavilion at the New York World's Fair.
FEATURES
By Robin Copper Benzle and Robin Copper Benzle,Contributing Writer | July 11, 1993
Innocently opening my icebox to get a glass of juice one day, I started to analyze the contents of my refrigerator. I decided that if a complete stranger looked in there, he would be able to tell a lot about me.He would know, for instance, that I liked hot food (seven bottles of Matouk's Hot Pepper Sauce from Trinidad). He would know that I'm somewhat of a pack rat (a dozen tiny containers filled with leftovers). He would surely know I had children (an empty milk carton, an ice cube tray with one cube in it)
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | September 15, 1992
An article in yesterday's Sun about sushi in Japan referred to "the late Craig Claiborne." The New York Times reports that its noted food writer "is very much alive."The Sun regrets the error.TOKYO -- The Japanese have been eating sushi since before the French had champagne and certainly centuries before the development of the crab cake -- to mention only two delights whose proper ingredients can cause national debate.In this century, the Japanese have made sushi their defining national dish, put restaurants that serve nothing else on every city street corner and battled European environmentalists who said it endangered the Atlantic bluefin tuna.
NEWS
June 23, 1992
M.F.K. Fisher, the grande dame of food writers, died yesterday at 83.Mary Frances Kennedy Fisher died at her home in Glen Ellen, Calif.,after a battle with Parkinson's disease, said her daughter Kennedy Wright.She wrote for such magazines as The New Yorker and completed 26 books and compilations of writings, among them "Serve It Forth," "How to Cook a Wolf," "The Gastronomical Me," "Consider the Oyster" and "An Alphabet For Gourmets."Her best-known work was her translation of legendary gastronomer Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin's 1825 book "The Physiology of Taste."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
Karen Licarowitz from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for a no-bake brandy Alexander pie. Barbara Aswad from Gambrills sent in a recipe for the pie that she said appeared in an article in The New York Times by Craig Claiborne in 1975. As it turns out, that was not the first time the recipe had appeared in the Times. According an article by Amanda Hesser in the Times magazine written in 2006, the recipe had originally run in paper in January 1970 and at the time was one of the three most-requested dessert recipes.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.