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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Baltimore Beer Week is on the way. The fifth annual citywide immersion into Baltimore's beer scene starts on Oct. 18, with an opening tap celebration at M&T Bank Stadium on Oct. 19. But there's an unusual beer event coming up for anyone who can't wait. On Oct. 10, the Pikesville Volunteer Fire Co. will host a craft beer and food pairing event at its firehouse. The event will offer guests seven pairing stations spread out in the firehouse's apparatus bays. A typical station might have pan-seared shrimp and Cajun-blackened corvina with Ballast Point Sculpin and Union Craft Brewing Duckpin.
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
In the beginning was a building. The rundown 19th-century gristmill in Monkton, some of its iron gear works moldering within the brick-and-stone structure, caught the attention of Curt Sherrer. The winemaker and lawyer spent about 10 years restoring the place, but then his labor of love birthed a tough question: What now? How to make money in the place? He and his son, Kyle, who had just graduated from the University of Baltimore with a degree in finance, considered an array of ideas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Full Tilt Brewing, Baltimore's newest craft beer producer, will release its flagship beer, Baltimore Pale Ale, on Saturday at the Americana in Canton. The release party will be held from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., and the first pint of Baltimore Pale Ale will be poured at 8 p.m. Baltimore Pale Ale pints will be sold for $2 all night. The founders and co-owners of Full Tilt Brewing are cousins Nick Fertig and Dan Baumiller. Full Tilt will also be launching its community support program at the release party.
NEWS
By Julekha Dash | September 3, 2014
B rewer Justin Bonner admits he was once more of a wine geek. But he stopped short of buying a vineyard on the Eastern Shore when he realized just how tough it would be to grow quality grapes in Maryland. Nonetheless, the former defense contractor wanted to produce an affordable drink that that he could share with the public. He noticed more Marylanders were drinking craft beers but suspected that the supply wasn't meeting demand. So he and his partner, Kasey Turner, spent $2 million to open Jailbreak Brewing Co., Howard County's first brewery, in March.
TRAVEL
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Just because you're on vacation at the shore doesn't mean every drink has to come with a tiny beach umbrella. Pitch the slushy or cosmopolitan, and think more along the lines of craft. Craft beer, that is. For a long time, beer drinkers lacked choices beyond "light or dark?" But the increasingly popular craft beer movement has expanded in imbibers' minds the possibilities for beer. Independent microbreweries have existed for years, but America's growing appreciation of small-batch, handcrafted products - and their never-quenched love of beer - seem to signal that this trend is not going away.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
When driving down Baltimore National Pike in Ellicott City, it's easy for eyes to wander. The myriad restaurants and shops all fight for attention with colorful signs and promises of limited-time deals. It's enough to give you a headache. But tucked away in the Enchanted Forest Shopping Center - behind the defunct theme park, around the corner from a grocery store and out of view from the pike - is a bar and restaurant that is clearly interested in providing an experience not typically expected at a strip mall.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Maryland's craft beer business is growing rapidly — at a rate of 35 percent a year — as consumers increasingly seek out independent brewers' new-style yet traditionally made beers. "There is just an amazing level of interest in craft beer, artisanal products in general, but craft beer specifically," said Jon Zerivitz, co-founder of Union Craft Brewing Co. "It's been growing all over the country. " Both new and existing companies are driving the expansion. Oliver Breweries, the 21-year-old beer-making operation of the Pratt Street Ale House in downtown Baltimore, has outgrown its beer-making space and is opening a small production plant.
NEWS
By Meg Tully, For The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
When Baltimore brewpub owners Don Kelly and Justin Dvorkin were looking to expand, Howard County grabbed their attention. They now plan to open the second location of The Alehouse in Columbia, which will join their Pratt Street location. "It's a great community. It's a nice community to be a part of, we thought," Kelly said. It is also a community where brewmasters are finding a home. The Alehouse will join Frisco Taphouse & Brewery and Pub Dog within a few blocks of one another on Dobbin Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2011
For the first time, there will be craft beer at the Maryland State Fair, which begins Friday at Timonium Fairgrounds.  Raven Beer, Heavy Seas Brewery, DuClaw Brewing, Dog Brewing from Westminster, Brewers Alley and Flying Dog Brewery will all be served at one big booth belonging to the Brewers Association of Maryland. BAM, a trade organization that represents the state's breweries and brewpubs, made the deal to bring the breweries to the fair. The association sees the State Fair as a platform to promote their products and to telegraph that their business "supports local jobs, local farms and local communities," BAM said in a statement.
NEWS
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
To make a cocktail, a bartender performs a complicated ballet involving spirits, mixers and garnishes, somehow juggling them all and finally bringing them in for a graceful, neat landing in your glass. At Heavy Seas Alehouse, bartender Will Helfrich has a simpler approach. He grabs a tall glass, sets it underneath the beer tap and pours eight ounces of sudsy, golden beer, Heavy Seas Classic Lager. And then tops it off with homemade pomegranate lemonade. Add a sprig of fresh rosemary and you have the Little Italy bar and restaurant's Sea Shandy.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
When driving down Baltimore National Pike in Ellicott City, it's easy for eyes to wander. The myriad restaurants and shops all fight for attention with colorful signs and promises of limited-time deals. It's enough to give you a headache. But tucked away in the Enchanted Forest Shopping Center - behind the defunct theme park, around the corner from a grocery store and out of view from the pike - is a bar and restaurant that is clearly interested in providing an experience not typically expected at a strip mall.
TRAVEL
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Just because you're on vacation at the shore doesn't mean every drink has to come with a tiny beach umbrella. Pitch the slushy or cosmopolitan, and think more along the lines of craft. Craft beer, that is. For a long time, beer drinkers lacked choices beyond "light or dark?" But the increasingly popular craft beer movement has expanded in imbibers' minds the possibilities for beer. Independent microbreweries have existed for years, but America's growing appreciation of small-batch, handcrafted products - and their never-quenched love of beer - seem to signal that this trend is not going away.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
Tucked in a corner of an older shopping center in Ellicott City, from the outside, White Oak Tavern is unassuming and nearly anonymous. But that's just the facade. Inside, White Oak (named for Maryland's state tree) is warm and food-centric, with an impressive craft beer selection and a well-executed menu that shines a light on local farmers. Scene & Decor White Oak's space is open and airy, with a large bar to the right, a dining room to the left and, in keeping with the "oak" theme, wood everywhere, from the floors to the benches to the walls.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Maryland's craft beer business is growing rapidly — at a rate of 35 percent a year — as consumers increasingly seek out independent brewers' new-style yet traditionally made beers. "There is just an amazing level of interest in craft beer, artisanal products in general, but craft beer specifically," said Jon Zerivitz, co-founder of Union Craft Brewing Co. "It's been growing all over the country. " Both new and existing companies are driving the expansion. Oliver Breweries, the 21-year-old beer-making operation of the Pratt Street Ale House in downtown Baltimore, has outgrown its beer-making space and is opening a small production plant.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Adam Benesch, a co-founder of Union Craft Brewing in Hampden, would like to take his Duckpin Pale Ale to a farmers' market and let consumers taste and buy it. John Knorr, co-owner of Evolution Craft Brewing in Salisbury, just wants to brew more beer. Both want the General Assembly to pass legislation that would help Maryland's burgeoning microbrewery industry continue to grow. Bills that would open farmers' markets and county fairs to tastings and sales by the state's beer producers and raise the limit on how many barrels brewpubs can produce top the 2014 wish list of the Brewers Association of Maryland.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
State lawmakers from Baltimore County hope to increase the availability of growlers, the refillable jugs that have become popular among craft beer enthusiasts. Sales of growlers have expanded elsewhere in Maryland in recent years, and county lawmakers say they want to keep up with the trend. Legislators have proposed a bill that would create growler permits for county businesses so people could take home beer from the tap. The legislation would allow liquor stores, restaurants and bars to apply for the permits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
It's not Ray Lewis coming out of retirement or Ed Reed demanding to be traded back to Charm City, but a Baltimore favorite is returning this Ravens season. Frederick 's Flying Dog Brewery will once again be the only Maryland-brewed craft beer available at M&T Bank Stadium for the 2013-2014 season. Beers that will be offered on draft include Snake Dog IPA, Doggie Style Pale Ale, Pearl Necklace Oyster Stout and UnderDog Atlantic Lager, according to Flying Dog director of communications Erin Weston.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2012
The former bottling plant in the Abell neighborhood has been all but abandoned for years. The Beverage Capital Corp. sign outside has faded. The white office walls have yellowed. A nearby mechanic uses the space that used to hold the bottling line as a parking lot. But when J. Hollis Albert tours the cavernous 48,000-square-foot facility, he imagines new life inside - brewers tinkering with formulas, bubbling fermentation tanks, beer bottles being filled and capped. Albert and Stephen Demczuk, owner of microbrewery Baltimore-Washington Beer Works, are in the final stages of opening Peabody Heights Brewery, which would be the city's first large-scale brewery in more than 30 years.
BUSINESS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Cousins Dan Baumiller and Nick Fertig launched Full Tilt Brewing in December, brewing beers in the basement of Baumiller's Sykesville home. Now, less than a year later, Full Tilt beers are on tap at more than 180 bars and restaurants and sold at more than 500 stores across the state. "We're just two home brewers who are trying to go into business," Baumiller said. "There's so much interest in local beers right now. We hope to open our own brewery in a couple years. " It's heady time for Maryland brewers like Baumiller and Fertig.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 26, 2013
Someone forgot to tell Patrick Beille that French guys are supposed to make wine, not beer. Hard cider would fit the French profile more than beer. But that's what the fellow does - he makes beer. The story of how Beille ended up in a brewery in the Waverly section of Baltimore starts in an idyll of the Old World, a little farm near a medieval village. I know: Farming is hard, especially as a start-up. But when you're young, daring, energetic and ambitious, then what this fellow had near Martel, in Midi-Pyrenees, sounds too awesome to leave.
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