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Crack Cocaine

NEWS
December 2, 1990
Baltimore County police seized an estimated $25,000 of crack cocaine Friday night and arrested four women in a drug raid at a Middle River apartment, a police department spokesman said.Undercover agents, acting on tips from residents at the Cove Village Apartments, began making $50 purchases of crack from a unit at the complex beginning in October, police said.About 8 p.m. Friday, they returned to the apartment with a search warrant.The drugs seized by detectives were packaged in small, $20 vials containing two or three "rocks" of crack, a cheap, highly addictive form of cocaine that is smoked by the user.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2000
A Carroll County Circuit Court judge rejected yesterday a defense attorney's motion to rule the arrest and search of a suspect in a drug case in Westminster were illegal because they were made without probable cause. "There clearly were some innocent and negligent inconsistencies [in police reports and testimony], which are not uncommon," said Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr., after hearing several hours of testimony at the pretrial hearing. "But there was probable cause to make the arrest and search."
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2002
Through a combination of planned drug raids and a search that came after a driver ran a red light, Anne Arundel County police have seized more than $4,000 worth of marijuana, crack cocaine and cash in recent days. In two days, eight people have been charged with drug violations around the county, police said yesterday. Narcotics officers made their biggest seizure of the week Tuesday in Glen Burnie. Police said officers watched two men sell marijuana to another man, then stopped the van in which the two men rode a short distance away.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 8, 1998
When it comes to getting busted by the police, crack cocaine is the riskiest drug, because crack smokers tend to buy it outdoors, in their own neighborhoods and from a variety of dealers, making them more conspicuous. But powder cocaine can be bought more discreetly, often indoors from a single dealer who caters to regular customers.Such insights into the drug trade highlight the federal government's first study to compare illicit heroin and cocaine markets in six U.S. cities from the consumer's perspective.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2003
Federal authorities said yesterday that they had shut down a crack cocaine ring operating on Maryland's Eastern Shore for more than seven years that collected more than $2 million in profits, which allegedly were laundered through the purchase of homes, cars and jewelry. Indictments unsealed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore described a far-reaching operation, with a steady customer base in rural Eastern Shore counties and inroads into some of the densely populated suburbs near Washington.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1996
Baltimore health officials are working to contain a syphilis outbreak -- linked to increased crack cocaine use -- that they fear could foreshadow a future rise in AIDS cases.Warnings are being sent to local physicians and health care providers, cautioning them to be on the alert for symptoms of the contagious disease, such as painless genital sores or rashes on the hands and face.The latest figures show that the number of city cases has soared by 83 percent in one year, from 192 cases in 1994 to 351 cases in 1995, putting Baltimore's rate among the highest of large U.S. cities last year.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1997
A Silver Spring woman was found guilty of stealing money from three severely retarded senior citizens she was supposed to be caring for in a group home in Columbia and abandoning them to buy drugs.Katherine Marie Matthews, 37, of the 900 block of North Belgrade Road pleaded guilty to reckless endangerment and misdemeanor theft in Howard County District Court on Friday for stealing money, taking a car and leaving the three patients unattended to buy crack cocaine in Baltimore in April.She received a suspended sentence and was ordered to pay more than $2,000 in restitution.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1998
For years, city police say, the Veronica Avenue Boys held the Cherry Hill neighborhood hostage by selling crack cocaine to visiting suburban addicts and shooting people to expand their territory.Yesterday, police said they had put an end to the terror with a series of raids that marked the first action in a new initiative aimed at curbing youth violence."The Veronica Avenue Boys is the most violent organization in our city," said Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier.He said the gang was responsible for shootings that claimed four lives and left 27 others wounded last year in a community of 13,000 residents, 10,000 of whom live in public housing.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2005
A Catonsville man, who helped run a Baltimore County-based drug ring that imported large amounts of cocaine, converted it to crack and laundered the profits through a record company, was sentenced in federal court yesterday to 25 years in prison. Gregory Lamont Wilson, 30, was convicted by a U.S. District Court jury Feb. 17, 2004, of conspiring to distribute crack cocaine and possession of a firearm. Wilson's attorney, Thomas Saunders, said yesterday that his client is considering an appeal.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF The Knight-Ridder news service contributed to this article | September 10, 1997
Baltimore could finish the year with the fewest homicides since 1989, when 262 people were killed -- a sign that drug-related violence might be dropping in neighborhoods accustomed to gunfire.It is the first significant indication that the city's recent violent crime drop might be cutting into the murder rate, which remained stubbornly constant despite a 50 percent reduction in shootings since 1993.Police attribute the fall to a variety of initiatives by Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier, such as going after guns and a downward crime trend in many East Coast urban centers hit hard by the crack cocaine epidemic that broke out in the mid-1980s.
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