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NEWS
July 8, 2011
Regarding Baltimore schools CEO Andrés Alonso's handling of the cheating scandal in which test scores were altered by school personnel, when these devious practices became public the guilty teachers should have been charged with committing a crime, brought to trial and punished accordingly — through reductions of salary, probation or firing. Also, it is quite evident that these teachers had absolutely no respect for Mr. Alonso once they believed they could do as they pleased.
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NEWS
October 2, 2014
"This is not West Africa," Texas health commissioner Dr. David Lakey said Wednesday at a news conference designed to dispel Texans' (and Americans') fear of an Ebola outbreak after a man there was diagnosed with the disease. "This is a very sophisticated city, a very sophisticated hospital. " The subtext: All those gruesome photos you're seeing of people dying in the streets in West Africa — that's something that happens over there, to other people, not here, not to us. But what the events of the last few days have shown is that it's exactly that kind of hubris that puts us most at risk, and that for all the sophistication of the U.S. health system, it only takes a simple lapse to create the conditions for a broader outbreak.
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NEWS
April 13, 2010
Police crack down on Frostburg binge drinking Maryland State Police say they are joining local law enforcement in a springtime crackdown on binge drinking in Frostburg, home to Frostburg State University. Capt. James Pyles said the effort began Friday and will continue through the spring. Besides increased patrols and visibility, police say they are collecting and analyzing intelligence on house parties held by unrecognized fraternities that are little more than drinking clubs.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
When : Friday, 7 p.m. Coaches : Anthony Burgos, Franklin; Donald Davis, Calvert Hall Last meeting : Calvert Hall won, 28-14, last season KEY PLAYERS TO WATCH Calvert Hall : DB-WR Dionte Austin, Sr.; RB Damien Farmer, Sr.; WR Lawrence Cager, Sr.; WR Morgan Scroggins, Sr.; RB D.J. Watson, Sr.; QB Kenji Bahar, Sr.; DB Bryan Marine, Sr.; LB Jaire Dorsey, Jr.; OL Drew Devanney, Sr. No. 3 Franklin : WR/DB Steven...
NEWS
October 13, 2010
What is the matter with Maryland where the abuse of animals is tolerated? I am not a native of Maryland and am ashamed to say that I now live here. The reports of people abusing animals and the law doing nothing is appalling ("Task force works to end cruelty to animals," Oct. 12). Caroline Griffin, who is leading a Baltimore task force on animal cruelty, is trying, so let us support her with her request for three police officers dedicated to animal abuse. This must stop. It is criminal.
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2011
An Abingdon man faces drug and traffic charges after police say he tried to flee a crash along U.S. Route 40 Wednesday and Harford County Sheriff's deputies recovered several grams of crack cocaine nearby. A deputy on Route 40 westbound near Abingdon Road tried to pull over a black 1993 Lexus about 9:15 p.m., according to a release from the sheriff's office, when the vehicle crashed into a barrier, hit a traffic sign and "went airborne" onto the other side of the highway. The Lexus hit a 2006 Honda Accord traveling east with four occupants, police said.
NEWS
December 6, 2011
The U.S. Attorney's Office approves reduced sentences for criminals who deserve them, but with the caveat that some crack cocaine dealers seeking early release from federal prison are violent. The Sun obscures the issue by claiming that federal crack guidelines led to convictions of "hundreds of thousands of petty offenders who were sentenced to long prison terms" ("Crack and the courts," Dec. 1). The truth is that only a few hundred Maryland drug dealers are eligible for sentence reductions.
NEWS
December 12, 2009
A 31-year-old Curtis Bay man was sentenced to more than 21 years in federal prison Friday for dealing crack cocaine, the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office announced. Lonnie Bivins' sentence was enhanced after the judge found him to be a "career offender" with two prior drug convictions. Bivins and his conspirators sold $500 to $4,000 worth of crack and powder cocaine per day in the Curtis Bay area of Baltimore from 2005 through 2008, according to court records. Law enforcement authorities witnessed Bivins making drug transactions for a year before arresting him in February 2008.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2011
Dwuan Dent and Antwan Askia were on opposite sides of an East Baltimore drug turf war in the 1990s that killed at least four people, according to federal prosecutors who charged Dent with murder and conspiracy and Askia with various drug counts. Both were convicted only of drug distribution charges, but because of tough-on-crime guidelines that imposed greater penalties for crack than powder cocaine, Dent was sentenced to more than 17 years in prison and Askia to 20. Now Dent and Askia are among scores of prisoners across the country who are being released early — the beneficiaries of efforts to change those sentencing guidelines that critics say disproportionately affected low-income people and minorities who faced longer prison terms for crack-cocaine charges.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | October 9, 1990
THE future of America's cities is lying in isolettes in the neonatal intensive care unit of Bronx-Lebanon hospital.The bright room is filled with baby misery: babies born months too soon; babies born weighing little more than a hardcover book; babies that look like wizened old men in the last stages of a terminal illness, wrinkled skin clinging to chicken bones; babies who do not cry because their mouths and noses are full of tubes.Some of these babies' mothers are never coming back. The little boy born in June, the one who has had two operations, two major infections, and who has the enormous head and shrunken limbs of famine children, has had no contact with his mother since the cord was cut.A little girl is the second child born this year to one woman.
NEWS
August 8, 2014
It's seafood time, dear readers! Enjoy the 33rd Havre de Grace Seafood Festival in Tydings Park, today through Sunday, (Aug. 8-10) Friday 3 to 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sample seafood delicacies from near and far, while enjoying live entertainment, artisans and crafters. Welcome to 3 Dog Night, live in concert, tonight, Aug. 8. Phone 410-939-1525 for more information or visit http://www.hdgseafoodfestival.org . The American Legion Post 47 will sponsor second and third Saturdays (of the month)
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Hundreds more problem properties in Baltimore are finding new buyers as the city steps up the use of decades-old law designed to root out negligent owners. The law, which community groups pioneered in the early 1990s, allows property owners to be sued for code violations and lose their buildings if they fail to make repairs. But until recently, transferring homes to new owners through a court-appointed receiver happened in just a few dozen cases each year. Now as part of its Vacants to Value initiative, the city is putting more focus on the law, swelling the auction lists.
NEWS
By Duncan Hill | June 17, 2014
Like many fans and casual observers around the world, my life has been inundated with soccer (or fútbol) over the past few days. This is not a complaint; I really love watching the World Cup. Generally speaking, I have never been able to get excited about watching soccer, especially American Major League Soccer, because the matches usually consist of about 800 completed passes and 0 goals. However, the World Cup is different; it's that special time every four years that we get to see some of the best athletes from around the globe compete for a gold trophy that they get to borrow until the next cup (and yes, I believe soccer players are some of the best, if not the best, athletes)
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
The consumption of alcohol at this year's Baltimore Pride festivities will be confined to two designated beer gardens within the larger event footprint, organizers said Thursday. "City officials are trying to crack down on alcohol consumption," said Kelly Neel, executive director of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore, or GLCCB, which organizes the events. "They told us we had to fence in the entire perimeter of everything and have it manned by police, or have the beer gardens, which was their preference.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
A Cherry Hill crack dealer admitted in federal court Wednesday to killing two rivals as part of a long-running feud between two neighborhood drug crews. Davon Martin, 25, was a member of a group known as Little Spelman, which was locked in a bitter war between 2011 and 2012 with another group, called Up Da Hill. His guilty plea to racketeering conspiracy highlights the interwoven nature of violence in some city neighborhoods. "Many of the shootings and murders in Baltimore City result from disputes between rival drug gangs," said U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
" The Onion " took a jab at Baltimore's long struggle with drugs in a story this week. The satiric site reported that Oriole Park at Camden Yards would no longer sell crack after the seventh inning. “From now on, fans who have been hitting the pipe all afternoon can take a bit of a breather to come down and stop tweaking out long enough to stagger home safely," the site quotes a stadium official as saying. "That's what Orioles baseball is all about.” The story concludes by saying that stadium workers "would continue to check IDs for everyone seeking to purchase crack, noting that - per Baltimore city regulations - sales of the drug are prohibited to anyone 14 years of age or younger.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
" The Onion " took a jab at Baltimore's long struggle with drugs in a story this week. The satiric site reported that Oriole Park at Camden Yards would no longer sell crack after the seventh inning. “From now on, fans who have been hitting the pipe all afternoon can take a bit of a breather to come down and stop tweaking out long enough to stagger home safely," the site quotes a stadium official as saying. "That's what Orioles baseball is all about.” The story concludes by saying that stadium workers "would continue to check IDs for everyone seeking to purchase crack, noting that - per Baltimore city regulations - sales of the drug are prohibited to anyone 14 years of age or younger.
NEWS
September 21, 2012
In his cavalier dismissal of the 47 percent of the population he describes as "people ... who don't take personal responsibility for their lives," Mitt Romney conveniently forgets about the large number of his own low-income, marginally educated but fervent supporters ("Remarks may haunt Romney," Sept. 18). These are people who Republican operatives have persuaded to demonize taxes, science, sensible gun control and women's reproductive rights rather than consider which candidate's approach would be in their own best interests.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
In baseball, it turns out, making a perfect schedule can be as elusive as throwing a perfect game. There are a lot of rules, starting with the basics: For each major league team, 81 games must be on the road and 81 at home, with 13 home weekend series and 19 games against divisional opponents. With any wiggle room left, a team such as the Orioles might ask for a home game on Father's Day or an away game when a concert is scheduled at nearby M&T Bank Stadium. But any special request from one team can lead to a lot of eraser smudges for the rest.
HEALTH
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
This spring, a group of college students will go about their usual campus routines, but with a voice only they can hear calling them names and making other distracting, disturbing sounds. In their case, the voice will come from a recording playing through earbuds as part of a research study. But researchers say the exercise could ultimately help increase awareness and break down the stigma that prevents those who suffer from auditory hallucinations and other symptoms of mental illness from getting the help they need.
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