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By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2002
Q. We had a very difficult time with crabgrass in our yard last year, and we are concerned that it will come back again this year. Is crabgrass a perennial plant? A. No, crabgrass is actually an annual plant, but it is a prolific seeder and tends to come back year after year once it is established. This is why many people apply crabgrass preventer in early spring. Crabgrass preventer is a pre-emergent herbicide that kills the seeds as they germinate. If you do not wish to use an herbicide, you will need to keep the crabgrass pulled before it goes to seed next summer.
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NEWS
August 25, 2013
Fall is approaching and this summer, with all the rain, has been kind to my lawn. What should I be thinking about doing as the seasons change? Carrie Engel of Valley View Farms in Cockeysville says now is a good time to get rid of any perennial weeds. She recommends Crab-E-Rad. Then, in a few weeks when the weather is cooler, it will be safe to seed. "Don't worry about the crabgrass," she said. "It's an annual and if you apply pre-emergent crabgrass preventer next spring, it will take care of it. " But the summer rains have given the other weeds what they need to thrive.
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NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | October 5, 2003
I have a small front lawn that has been completely taken over by crabgrass. What can I do to get my lawn back? The summer rains have helped produce a bumper crop of crabgrass this year. Crabgrass is an annual grass that dies out in the winter. However, it is a prolific seeder and returns each summer from overwintering seed. To get your lawn back will require two steps. First, you must get rid of the crabgrass you already have so that you can reseed the area. And second, you must prevent the crabgrass from returning next summer.
NEWS
By Janine Wood | December 18, 2007
DEERFIELD, ILL. -- My neighbor, an elderly woman, hung up on me a few weeks ago. "Your leaves are blowing into my yard," she told me during our final conversation. "If you can afford to live in this area, surely you can afford a weekly landscaping service." Click. She and I weren't the best of friends, but we were neighborly, cordial, and we had often talked over her backyard fence. My son walked her dogs, and I checked on her house when she traveled. Her spare key is in my kitchen drawer.
NEWS
March 4, 2001
Q. I have quite a bit of English ivy under some trees in my yard that seems to be diseased. There are small round spots on many of the leaves. Others look like they are thinly coated with black tar. I never noticed this before. Is there anything I can do? A. You have two separate problems, neither of which is life-threatening to a healthy stand of English ivy. The spots are caused by bacterial leaf-spot disease. The disease causes more noticeable injury during wet, humid summers. Prune out and discard the badly infected leaves and stems.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to the Sun | August 4, 2007
Some rhizomes of my bearded iris smell rotten. When I dig them up, they're like mush. Leaves are dying, or gooey or fine. What do I do? Iris borers are pale, hairless caterpillars of a moth. In early spring, the moth's eggs hatch into tiny caterpillars that chew inside leaves, causing brown streaks and brown tips in the plant, though the entire iris seldom dies. By midsummer, borers tunnel into the rhizome. Their feeding allows entry of a bacterial soft rot that makes rhizomes slimy, soft and foul-smelling.
NEWS
August 25, 2013
Fall is approaching and this summer, with all the rain, has been kind to my lawn. What should I be thinking about doing as the seasons change? Carrie Engel of Valley View Farms in Cockeysville says now is a good time to get rid of any perennial weeds. She recommends Crab-E-Rad. Then, in a few weeks when the weather is cooler, it will be safe to seed. "Don't worry about the crabgrass," she said. "It's an annual and if you apply pre-emergent crabgrass preventer next spring, it will take care of it. " But the summer rains have given the other weeds what they need to thrive.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | August 17, 2003
What is the purpose of deadheading flowers, and should all flowers be deadheaded? Plant seeds are produced in the ovaries of flowers. When the flowers are removed by deadheading, the plant stops producing seeds and instead uses that energy to produce more flowers. So the goal of deadheading is to encourage plants to produce more flowers. It works on a number of plants, especially those perennial plants that have long bloom periods in the summer and fall. Some of the plants that benefit from deadheading are coneflowers, blanket flowers, black-eyed Susans and garden mums.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2005
A new grass is invading our property. It's very prevalent along streets. On a Web site database, it looks like Mary's Grass. How can I control this invasive grass? Stiltgrass (also called Vietnamese or Japanese stiltgrass) is a non-native weed spreading quickly in Maryland, overtaking forests and wetlands as well as home landscapes. This annual's shallow root system can be easily hand pulled before it goes to seed. Plants with seed heads should be bagged and put out with the trash. For your lawn, a spring application of crabgrass pre-emergent herbicide can prevent seed germination for the year.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 23, 2001
Q. We planted grass seed several weeks ago, but it has still not germinated. Do you think there is something wrong with the seed or is there another problem? A. The seed could be stale, but the seed on most store shelves is fresh and should germinate. I would check the date on the label, but this is an unlikely cause of the germination failure. Another unlikely cause is low temperature. Grass seed will not germinate properly when temperatures are consistently below 60 degrees; however, that would rarely be a problem this time of year.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to the Sun | August 4, 2007
Some rhizomes of my bearded iris smell rotten. When I dig them up, they're like mush. Leaves are dying, or gooey or fine. What do I do? Iris borers are pale, hairless caterpillars of a moth. In early spring, the moth's eggs hatch into tiny caterpillars that chew inside leaves, causing brown streaks and brown tips in the plant, though the entire iris seldom dies. By midsummer, borers tunnel into the rhizome. Their feeding allows entry of a bacterial soft rot that makes rhizomes slimy, soft and foul-smelling.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2005
A new grass is invading our property. It's very prevalent along streets. On a Web site database, it looks like Mary's Grass. How can I control this invasive grass? Stiltgrass (also called Vietnamese or Japanese stiltgrass) is a non-native weed spreading quickly in Maryland, overtaking forests and wetlands as well as home landscapes. This annual's shallow root system can be easily hand pulled before it goes to seed. Plants with seed heads should be bagged and put out with the trash. For your lawn, a spring application of crabgrass pre-emergent herbicide can prevent seed germination for the year.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | October 5, 2003
I have a small front lawn that has been completely taken over by crabgrass. What can I do to get my lawn back? The summer rains have helped produce a bumper crop of crabgrass this year. Crabgrass is an annual grass that dies out in the winter. However, it is a prolific seeder and returns each summer from overwintering seed. To get your lawn back will require two steps. First, you must get rid of the crabgrass you already have so that you can reseed the area. And second, you must prevent the crabgrass from returning next summer.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | August 17, 2003
What is the purpose of deadheading flowers, and should all flowers be deadheaded? Plant seeds are produced in the ovaries of flowers. When the flowers are removed by deadheading, the plant stops producing seeds and instead uses that energy to produce more flowers. So the goal of deadheading is to encourage plants to produce more flowers. It works on a number of plants, especially those perennial plants that have long bloom periods in the summer and fall. Some of the plants that benefit from deadheading are coneflowers, blanket flowers, black-eyed Susans and garden mums.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2002
Q. We had a very difficult time with crabgrass in our yard last year, and we are concerned that it will come back again this year. Is crabgrass a perennial plant? A. No, crabgrass is actually an annual plant, but it is a prolific seeder and tends to come back year after year once it is established. This is why many people apply crabgrass preventer in early spring. Crabgrass preventer is a pre-emergent herbicide that kills the seeds as they germinate. If you do not wish to use an herbicide, you will need to keep the crabgrass pulled before it goes to seed next summer.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 23, 2001
Q. We planted grass seed several weeks ago, but it has still not germinated. Do you think there is something wrong with the seed or is there another problem? A. The seed could be stale, but the seed on most store shelves is fresh and should germinate. I would check the date on the label, but this is an unlikely cause of the germination failure. Another unlikely cause is low temperature. Grass seed will not germinate properly when temperatures are consistently below 60 degrees; however, that would rarely be a problem this time of year.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | March 19, 1993
When the circus rolls into town for a one-day performance tomorrow, its cast of characters will include High Flying Hydrocarbons, Notorious Nitrogen Oxides and an earth in the balance.The inventive Save-the-Earth Circus, a production of the Connecticut-based Crabgrass Puppet Theatre, should prove a hit with parents, as well as children, thanks to its blend of funny-bone humor, fast-paced puppet action and serious lessons aimed at changing wasteful habits."One thing I really look for before booking a performance is whether it will offer children the humor and action needed to keep them interested, as well as some element of education," says Barbara Lett, special events assistant for the Howard County Department of Parks and Recreation, which is sponsoring the show.
NEWS
December 22, 1995
YOU WOULD THINK they'd just saved Flipper and his children judging from the way biologists went all giddy this week after finding 57 brook trout in the Jabez Branch, that piddling little creek that runs near Route 97 in Anne Arundel County. So what, you ask. Why should anyone care about 57 fish too little to make a decent snack even if you ate them all at once? And why is the state spending our money to protect the unimpressive waterway that is their home?Like most disputes over flora and fauna, this one looks like a hullabaloo over nothing to some people.
NEWS
March 4, 2001
Q. I have quite a bit of English ivy under some trees in my yard that seems to be diseased. There are small round spots on many of the leaves. Others look like they are thinly coated with black tar. I never noticed this before. Is there anything I can do? A. You have two separate problems, neither of which is life-threatening to a healthy stand of English ivy. The spots are caused by bacterial leaf-spot disease. The disease causes more noticeable injury during wet, humid summers. Prune out and discard the badly infected leaves and stems.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | April 13, 2000
AS EVERY AMERICAN male homeowner knows, the sweetest ritual of spring is firing up the weed-whacker and defoliating vast expanses of one's yard. Running a heavy, cumbersome power tool along an uneven sidewalk, sparks flying everywhere, dirt and gravel spraying dangerously into the eyes of passers-by, the machine's unearthly wail disturbing every neighbor within a two-block radius -- it just doesn't get any better than that. Sadly, women, as a general rule, don't appreciate the joys of weed-whacking.
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