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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
The menu at Rosario's Italian Kitchen covers everything from fried shrimp to breakfast all day, but as the restaurant's name implies, for many, dinner time here means Italian. And at this friendly Rosedale spot that opened in 2012, those Italian dinners are very good. Scene & Decor The restaurant is open nearly around the clock - from 7 a.m. until 4 a.m. every day. Those hours and the menu's dizzying array of options scream "diner. " Rosario's is mostly casual but its warm decor and professional service elevate it above diner level.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
Patricia Jones of Catonsville was in search of the recipe for the crab imperial that was served at the Garrison Grill, a restaurant located near Walbrook Junction in West Baltimore during the 1950s. No luck tracking down the owner or anyone else who might have the specific recipe from the Garrison Grill, but several readers saw Jones' request and sent in their favorite recipes for crab imperial. Ester Marsiglia of Pikesville sent in a recipe that comes from the "Seafood Cookery" booklet published by Home Services of Baltimore Gas and Electric in the 1950s, and it is an excellent example of a traditional Maryland recipe.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
Standing over a large tub, Gary Moree sorted crabs and stocked his walk-in cooler Friday at Bay Island Seafood, preparing for the onslaught of Memorial Day weekend customers. The cooler was stacked to the ceiling with bushels of Maryland and Delaware crabs and boxes of the oversized Louisiana variety. A barrel of Moree's Bay Island seasoning - a secret blend of rock salt, spices and pepper - stood nearby. "Everyone wants their crabs," said Moree, president of the family owned business that's been a mainstay in Southwest Baltimore since 1952.
NEWS
May 11, 2014
I'd like to put in my two cents worth on the blue crab situation in the Chesapeake Bay. In his letter, Richard Anderson made a valid point as to the size of the industry and number of people that would be affected ( "Crabbing moratorium isn't the answer," May 7). However, Mr. Anderson should be more aware of the full choice between losing business for one year and losing it forever. One female crab can repopulate the entire species, and they should be protected and banned from harvesting.
NEWS
By Gerald W. Winegrad | May 8, 2014
The recent bad news on the serious decline in female blue crabs (" May 1) and the subsequent editorial ("Singing the blues," May 5 ) calling for much tighter harvest restrictions should be a wake-up call for all who care about the Chesapeake Bay. The winter dredge survey found one of the lowest crab levels in 25 years of sampling. The harvest in 2013 was the lowest in more than 20 years. At the root of this decline are two factors: overharvest and poor environmental conditions.
NEWS
May 8, 2014
As summer draws near, Americans anticipate coming delights - a cabin in the woods, a blanket on a beach, a boat on a river. In Maryland, that iconic image is a table laden with steamed crabs. Thus has it been for generations in the "land of pleasant living. " It was with heavy hearts, then, that Marylanders took in the news last week from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater that they could expect another season of relatively scarce, and therefore expensive, blue crabs.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
While I seldom agree with columnist Dan Rodricks , his commentary on the Chesapeake Bay's declining crab population hit the nail on the head ( "It's time to stop tinkering and just ban crabbing for one year," May 3). My family is from the Eastern Shore, and I grew up appreciating the marvelous bounty that comes from the Chesapeake Bay. However, the bay needs a rest. A three-year moratorium on crab harvesting would be ideal, but I'll take whatever I can get. Additionally, there should be a permanent ban on commercial harvesting of female crabs.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
As I have written before, no one will mention one of the major solutions to the problem of preserving the state's crab population, which I believe stems from a fear of offending the commercial waterman ( "Singing the blues," May 5). At least five years ago recreational crabbers had our catches reduced from two bushels to one, a 50 percent reduction. Nor can recreational crabbers any longer keep female crabs. Yet commercial crabbers are still allowed to catch and keep female crabs, and their catches haven't been reduced by half.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
In response to Dan Rodricks ' article, "Stop tinkering: Ban crabbing for a year" (May 4) I must say that his solution to the Chesapeake Bay's crab shortage, placing a moratorium on crab harvesting, is too simple and elementary for this complex and multi-faceted problem. The Chesapeake Bay blue crab industry makes up $700 million of the state of Maryland's economy. There are many individuals and businesses involved in this economy, starting with watermen, marinas and boat repairs, bait and tackle supplies, truck drivers, fuel companies, crab wholesalers, crab picking houses, carry-out crab houses, sit down restaurants, refrigeration services, boiler services, and the list could continue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
The Valley Inn, a landmark property on Falls Road near the city-county border, is back in business. Now operated by Ted Bauer, owner of the of the popular Oregon Grille in Hunt Valley, the Valley Inn has been revealing itself, quietly, in stages. First came a clubby bar, which opened in late January with an introductory menu of sandwiches and bar snacks. In late February, a traditional, wood-paneled dining room began serving a full dinner menu. Bauer acquired the Valley Inn in 2011 from John "Bud" Hatfield Jr., whose family had operated it for nearly 90 years.
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