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FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | October 4, 1992
All children love a party and love presents. That basic premise inspired Phil Bundy to found Children's Favorite Things three years ago. This year, there will be 12 Christmas parties held all over the state for about 2,000 children. Bundy, a young entrepreneur who plans international golf outings for corporations, gets his guest list from Maryland Family Support Systems.But 2,000 children means 2,000 toys, so last weekend, more than 100 people arrived at his mother's Monkton farm for a crab feast to kick off the big fund-raiser, the Fred Funk Invitational Golf Tournament at Hunt Valley Golf Club on Nov. 11. Crab feast chair Kris Perkins, (husband Jay owns Jay Perkins Golf Shop)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | August 1, 2002
Love crabs? The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels has got just your thing this weekend. The museum presents its annual "Crab Days" celebration, a two-day festival filled with crab delicacies, crab races, crab-catching demonstrations and more, for all crab-craving types. For the crab-eaters: Indulge in crab cakes, soft-shell crabs, steamed crabs, crab soup and lots more. For the crab-curious: Watch local watermen display their crab-netting skills and make crab pots. For the crab-challenged: Learn to pick crab meat and get tips from local crab pickers.
SPORTS
Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Don Backe and Karl Guerra share more than a love for sailing: After their lives were transformed by tragedy, both men used the sport and the organization they now run to regain their sense of purpose. Backe helped found Chesapeake Region Accessible Boating in 1991, four years after a horrific one-vehicle automobile accident in Crownsville left the former independent private school headmaster a paraplegic at age 51. Guerra is now executive director for the Annapolis-based nonprofit organization that helps those with physical, mental and emotional handicaps - along with others who can't afford financially to sail - gain entrance to a sport Guerra thought he had lost when he suffered a massive stroke in 2000 at age 52. But it could take the dream of a much younger man without any disabilities with the same love of being on the open waters to help keep CRAB afloat.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 20, 2001
YOU NEVER FORGET your first crab fluff. Mine came, like a balloon in the Macy's parade, out of the kitchen at Bud's Crab House in Highlandtown in 1976. (I guess this is the silver anniversary of my first crab fluff.) It looked like a swollen, brown softball with claws and legs. You could start a pretty good argument over how to make a crab fluff, but, from what I remember, Bud's short-order cook stuffed a soft-shell crab with crabmeat, dipped the whole thing in some kind of thick batter and launched the concoction into a deep fryer.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | January 23, 2008
We're not sure where the idea of putting crab meat in marinara sauce came from, though it's been around for a while. The makers of Grandmom Concetta's Original Crab-inara Pasta Sauce say they use a recipe that dates to 1929, from a grandmother who used to serve it to relatives visiting the New Jersey shore. Some Marylanders like to give these bottled sauces as gifts, and Chesapeake Bay expatriates order them for a taste of home. But which crab marinara tastes best over pasta? We boiled a batch of penne and conducted a blind tasting of three sauces to find out. kate.
NEWS
By Rob Hiaasen and Glenn McNatt and Rob Hiaasen and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2005
Long associated with bottom feeding and Old Bay, the crab has commanded little respect in artistic circles. Perhaps its time has come. This month, a call went out for artists with a yen to create crab art. By May, as many as 200 of the 5 1/2 -foot decorated crab sculptures will pop up all over town - the Inner Harbor, City Hall, maybe even at M&T Bank Stadium. "I want to see them all over town. Put them everyplace!" said Nancy Haragan, executive director of the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance, one of several organizations in the Baltimore Crabtown Project, a public art and school fund-raising effort.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | March 18, 1994
Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke weighed in yesterday with his opinion of the giant crab sculpture proposed for Baltimore's Rash Field, suggesting it needs more seasoning."
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | August 8, 2006
Scientists identified yesterday a mysterious crab found more than a year ago in Baltimore's Patapsco River as a Chinese mitten crab, suggesting that the exotic species from Asia could be breeding. The identification comes three days after the state Department of Natural Resources issued an alert for the possible invasive species, saying a Pasadena waterman reported catching a mitten crab in the same river. Researchers want to know if the hairy-clawed, spider-legged creatures will multiply in the Chesapeake Bay and become pests, said Gregory Ruiz, a biologist with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 1998
Bo Brooks, serving steamed hard shells for more than 30 years, satisfies all of Charm City's gastronomic rules for classic crab houses.Rule One: The best crab houses are not fancy.Clearly, Bo Brooks scores on that front. The dining room is open and bright, like a cafeteria. There's lots of room to stretch out for serious crab eating. Plastic abounds, in the bright orange plastic chairs, molded plastic paneling and plastic buckets on the floor for shell overload. Tables are set in classic form, with brown DTC paper, wooden mallets and plastic knives for extracting those hard-to-reach crab bits.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1994
The unlicensed crab pickers on Smith Island have won a three-month reprieve from a state crackdown on their illicit cottage industry, which they feared would require them to leave the traditional Chesapeake Bay watermen's community.At the request of Gov. William Donald Schaefer, state Health Secretary Nelson J. Sabatini agreed yesterday to give a group of women on the marshy island in the lower bay another 90 days to comply with strict, costly rules for commercial food preparation.The state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene began issuing letters last week warning about two dozen watermen's wives and widows on the island to stop picking crabs for sale in their backyard sheds, which the state considers a food-poisoning hazard.
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