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NEWS
July 16, 2010
Your article, "Abuse of crab pickers is alleged" (July 15), prompted me to respond. I am an immigrant who used to prepare employment and family-based visas. The U.S. has millions of low-skilled unemployed workers and able-bodied welfare recipients. Why don't we give them incentives to take crab picker jobs and other positions currently held by illegal migrants? Should the federal government continue to borrow from China and other countries to create jobs, or should we immediately enact some sort of immigration moratorium and seriously enforce our immigration laws across the board, as stricly as China and Mexico do, so that we can first put legal immigrants and U.S.-born citizens to work?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
The Barn Crab House, the longtime Carney destination for steamed crabs and live music, has closed.  The Facebook page for the venue was boiling over with concern on Tuesday morning, and later in the day, Paul Wisner, one of the Barn's current co-owners, sent out an email confirming the news: "I regret to inform everyone that due to circumstances beyond my control, management and extenuating circumstances over the past year that has just recently...
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
For years, environmentalists and watermen have been searching for a way to deal with the Chesapeake Bay's "ghost pots" - derelict crab traps that are too deep to retrieve and too problematic to co-exist with marine life. Though the traps have been abandoned, they continue to ensnare and kill crabs. Now two Anne Arundel County high school seniors have developed a possible solution: a trap held together with zinc rings that decay, making abandoned traps fall apart at the bottom of the bay. "Leave it kids to find a great solution for a serious problem," said Tony Friedrich, executive director of the Coastal Conservation Association of Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2011
Along most of America's coastline, crustaceans get boiled. Sometimes in plain old Yankee water. Sometimes in spicy Cajun stock. Whatever the liquid, there's a whole pot of it bubbling away. Whatever the seafood - Maine lobster, Carolina blue crab, Louisiana crawfish - it takes the plunge. And that's just wrong. Ask anyone in Maryland, where there's just one way to cook a crab. That way is steaming. "I think we're pretty much the main steamers as far as I know," said John Shields, chef-owner of Gertrude's restaurant and author of several books on coastal cooking, including "The Chesapeake Bay Crab Cookbook.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | June 20, 1991
Gunning's Crab House has escaped the claws of public auction.The owners of the South Baltimore landmark at 3901 S. Hanover St. reached an agreement with their mortgage holder yesterday and averted an auction that was scheduled next week for the property.That means Gunning's will not be forced to close next week and will continue to sell its award-winning crab cakes and fried pepper rings covered with powdered sugar."I'm very happy. This is wonderful news," said Edward Gunning, who started the crab house with his dad 22 years ago.Laurel Federal Savings Bank agreed yesterday to accept installments through the summer from the Gunning family to pay off its $160,000 mortgage, Gunning's lawyer, Howard Heneson, said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
Despite its name, there is nothing dire about the Dead End Saloon in Fells Point . In fact, it is quite a lively spot, even on a weeknight. The establishment's name stems not from its atmosphere, nor its clientele, but from its location. It sits on a cobblestone way, Fell Street, that ends abruptly at the water. If you attempted to travel beyond Fell Street, you would meet an unfortunate watery demise. When the saloon added a kitchen in the late 1990s, the "Pelican Grille" was added to its full name.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 13, 1992
I won a crab picking contest. Me, a guy who was born in Kansas, and grew up believing "seafood" was fish sticks. Me, who once thought a crab hammer was something you put in your tool box. Me, who wouldn't know a crab knife from a putty knife, pulled 7 1/4 ounces of meat and some shell from about four crabs in three minutes to win the First Annual Preakness Crab Picking Contest Monday at Harborplace.I have the placard for my wall, and the cuts on my hand to prove it.I should remember that this was not a contest for crab-picking pros.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1994
Smith Island's crab pickers have won a reprieve from a threatened state crackdown on their traditional but unlicensed cottage industry. Now all they need are some crabs to pick.Nelson J. Sabatini, the state health secretary, announced yesterday that the state had signed a consent order with 17 women from Tylerton, the smallest of three villages on the Chesapeake Bay island that depend on crabbing and fishing for a livelihood.The agreement, filed this week in Somerset County Circuit Court, allows the women -- watermen's wives and widows -- to continue picking crab meat at home, provided they build a processing plant by Oct. 15 that will comply with state rules.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam and Brian Sullam,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1997
Dining at the Cheshire Crab reinforces the notion that appearances often can be deceiving.Our object lesson began with the drive to the restaurant. As we turned off Fort Smallwood Road and drove down a series of residential streets, my dinner companions expressed doubts about my navigational skills. However, when the restaurant's well-lighted sign appeared on our right, they immediately became believers.When we walked onto the expansive deck of the restaurant, which overlooks Main Creek and a marina, and saw people in shorts at picnic tables picking at piles of crabs, we had the feeling we were in the wrong place.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1995
Warning of a "crisis brewing" over dwindling female blue crabs in Chesapeake Bay, Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday called for emergency restrictions on crabbing starting this fall.He proposed regulations effective Sept. 15 that would limit recreational and commercial crabbing to five days a week, banning catch on Wednesday and Sunday. He also proposed closing the crab season six weeks early, on Nov. 15.Crabbing is now allowed seven days a week from April 1 through Dec. 31.Next year, the governor said, he would seek to ban crabbing one day a week all season long and halt the recreational and commercial harvest even earlier, on Oct. 31.Taken together, he said, the new restrictions should reduce the harvest of female crabs by 40 to 45 percent, bringing the catch back to 1990-1992 levels.
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