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NEWS
June 13, 1993
Marylanders have always kept a close eye on the health o King Crab, but usually only after he has been properly steamed and seasoned.Market prices and available sizes at restaurants, seafood markets and carryout shops have been the primary public measures of change to the prodigious populations of these beautiful swimmers of the Chesapeake.Some years the delectable crustaceans are huge and abundant, other times they're scarce and small and costly. But that has always been the way with the cycle of nature.
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NEWS
December 16, 1990
The county liquor board has ruled that the owners of Spittel's Crab House in Sykesville cannot apply for a liquor license again for six months because they violated county law.The restaurant, at 1043 Liberty Road, was closed from Sept. 14 through Oct. 12. County liquor law says an establishment cannot be closed for more than 10 consecutive days without notifying the board.Betty S. McGuirk testified at a hearing in November that her family had been operating the business because she was ill.Co-owner Patricia M. Prediger testified she had not been aware the business was closed for that period.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun reporter | May 8, 2008
CAMBRIDGE - Nearly 200 watermen packed the pavilion at Sailwinds Park last night to hear details of new harvest rules that they fear will ruin commercial fishermen whose business depends in large part on catching female blue crabs, the Chesapeake Bay's signature fishery. The number of crabs has dropped so sharply that Maryland and Virginia imposed restrictions last month that are aimed at reducing the annual harvest of females by one-third. About half of the blue crabs harvested in Maryland waters are females, officials say, and many are caught in warm fall waters.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | March 30, 1994
Maryland is lowering the boom on Smith Island's unlicensed crab pickers, warning watermen's wives and widows of stiff fines if they continue their decades-old tradition of selling crab meat in violation of state health laws.In letters mailed last week, the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene informed 22 residents of this isolated, marshy island in the lower Chesapeake Bay that after tomorrow they may no longer pick crab meat for sale to the public unless they comply with the state's strict -- and costly -- food processing guidelines.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 27, 2000
The A-1 Crab Haven at the corner of Old Eastern Avenue and Back River Neck Road may not have the landmark status that Haussner's did, but for many Baltimoreans its closing tomorrow after 54 years will be every bit as sad. The owner, Mike Pangalis, has decided to retire and has sold the property to a private developer. Known locally for its steamed crabs and traditional Maryland seafood dishes, A-1 also has an art collection: some 1,000 clown figurines, portraits and other clown memorabilia that will be auctioned off tomorrow at the restaurant, starting at 5 p.m. A-1 has been family-owned and -run since Pangalis took over the restaurant in 1955.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
With Maryland's crabbing season getting under way Friday, the state is making a new bid to buy back commercial fishing licenses, particularly from the 650 license-holders officials estimate are no longer active on the Chesapeake Bay. The Department of Natural Resources mailed buyback offers last month to all 2,258 people with unlimited tidal fishing or crab harvester licenses. The amount offered ranges from a base of $4,000 for the crab harvester license, which allows the holder to fish with up to 300 crab pots, to $12,000 for a tidal fishing license with authorization for 900 crab pots in the bay. State officials say the buyback is intended to keep pressure on the bay's rebuilding crab population from soaring if all the holders of unused licenses were to go back on the water.
NEWS
July 16, 2010
Your article, "Abuse of crab pickers is alleged" (July 15), prompted me to respond. I am an immigrant who used to prepare employment and family-based visas. The U.S. has millions of low-skilled unemployed workers and able-bodied welfare recipients. Why don't we give them incentives to take crab picker jobs and other positions currently held by illegal migrants? Should the federal government continue to borrow from China and other countries to create jobs, or should we immediately enact some sort of immigration moratorium and seriously enforce our immigration laws across the board, as stricly as China and Mexico do, so that we can first put legal immigrants and U.S.-born citizens to work?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
The Barn Crab House, the longtime Carney destination for steamed crabs and live music, has closed.  The Facebook page for the venue was boiling over with concern on Tuesday morning, and later in the day, Paul Wisner, one of the Barn's current co-owners, sent out an email confirming the news: "I regret to inform everyone that due to circumstances beyond my control, management and extenuating circumstances over the past year that has just recently...
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
For years, environmentalists and watermen have been searching for a way to deal with the Chesapeake Bay's "ghost pots" - derelict crab traps that are too deep to retrieve and too problematic to co-exist with marine life. Though the traps have been abandoned, they continue to ensnare and kill crabs. Now two Anne Arundel County high school seniors have developed a possible solution: a trap held together with zinc rings that decay, making abandoned traps fall apart at the bottom of the bay. "Leave it kids to find a great solution for a serious problem," said Tony Friedrich, executive director of the Coastal Conservation Association of Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2011
Along most of America's coastline, crustaceans get boiled. Sometimes in plain old Yankee water. Sometimes in spicy Cajun stock. Whatever the liquid, there's a whole pot of it bubbling away. Whatever the seafood - Maine lobster, Carolina blue crab, Louisiana crawfish - it takes the plunge. And that's just wrong. Ask anyone in Maryland, where there's just one way to cook a crab. That way is steaming. "I think we're pretty much the main steamers as far as I know," said John Shields, chef-owner of Gertrude's restaurant and author of several books on coastal cooking, including "The Chesapeake Bay Crab Cookbook.
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