Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCrab
IN THE NEWS

Crab

NEWS
By ROB KASPER | July 8, 2009
When you eat steamed crabs are you a dipper, a swiper or a sauce-maker? A dipper removes the crab meat from the shell then drops it in a bowl of liquid, usually apple-cider vinegar or melted butter. A swiper rubs the crab meat quickly over the bits of seasoning clinging to the shell. A sauce-maker combines ingredients, usually mustard, mayonnaise and ketchup, then drags the crab meat through this creation. There is also another option: None of the above. That is, just eating the crab meat as soon as it pops out of the shell.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 6, 2014
Dan Rodricks ' recommendation for a one-year moratorium on the crab harvest is correct ( "It's time to stop tinkering and just ban crabbing for one year," May 3). The members of the Maryland General have a history of not showing courage when faced with the facts. It took them several sessions to really put "teeth" into the laws on seat belts and with laws restricting cell phone use while driving. When it became apparent that the shad population was in danger, they finally took action, and in a couple of years the shad run was again in full swing.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
Blaine Young isn't exactly a household name in Maryland, but the prospective contender for the Republican GOP nomination has to be a bit better known in political circles after the splash he made at the annual political rite of passage known as the J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake in Crisfield Wednesday. Young, president of the Frederick County Board of County Commissioners, brought a busload of supporters to the Eastern Shore fishing port to promote his increasingly credible candidacy.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | August 11, 2011
Bottom of the Bay, the venerable (since 1972) crab joint-cum-seafood restaurant on Route 1 in Laurel, is not easy to describe. It's a one-story, two-room structure that defines what Maine lobster purveyors up "nawth" call "eating in the ruff. " That is, shoes and shirts are required (we think), but that's about it. Boasting about 60 seats, according to manager John Knapp, the main dining room and the bar are roughly equal in size. If you're seeking intimacy, forget it. Individual tables are set up on two sides, against the walls.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
Jack Brooks and other leaders of Maryland's seafood industry have faced the same problem for more than a decade: a shortage of seasonal foreign workers to pick out the morsels of crab meat that wind up on dinner plates across the country. But this summer, Brooks and the operators of other Eastern Shore picking houses are dealing with an entirely different challenge. Brooks has plenty of workers, but he's not sure whether he'll be able to afford to keep them. Seafood processors along the East Coast are steamed about a new Labor Department requirement that would force businesses that use foreign workers to increase their wages by as much as 50 percent.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | July 22, 2011
For millions of years, crabs have been scuttling about the bottom of the world's oceans and bays, but few regions have embraced the mean-spirited, omnivorous crustacean with as much vigor as we have here in Maryland. When I moved here from the Midwest and soon after attended my first crab feast, I remember thinking, "What is wrong with these people?" Sitting in the hot sun for hours at a clip, smashing steamed crustaceans with a mallet and then sorting through razor-sharp bits of shell and crab entrails for a thimbleful of meat seemed more like some sort of torture than a good time.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 20, 2001
YOU NEVER FORGET your first crab fluff. Mine came, like a balloon in the Macy's parade, out of the kitchen at Bud's Crab House in Highlandtown in 1976. (I guess this is the silver anniversary of my first crab fluff.) It looked like a swollen, brown softball with claws and legs. You could start a pretty good argument over how to make a crab fluff, but, from what I remember, Bud's short-order cook stuffed a soft-shell crab with crabmeat, dipped the whole thing in some kind of thick batter and launched the concoction into a deep fryer.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 26, 1994
There are two kinds of crab pickers in Maryland. Those who use wooden mallets to crack the shells of steamed blue crabs, and those who use knives.I'm a mallet man, with aspirations to be a knife-wielder. I feel at home among the noisy, crustacean-clobbering crowds of Baltimore. But as soon as I cross the Bay Bridge, I feel inferior. On the Eastern Shore the knife-wielders work so swiftly and silently, that almost faster than you can say, "I'm not from around here," a crab has been separated from its shell.
NEWS
September 5, 1995
Maryland's plan to limit crabbing comes at the last minute, but not too late for the migrating female crabs it aims to protect. Their peak travel time to the lower bay to bury themselves and their fertilized eggs is in September and October, the time when they are most vulnerable to the crab pot and trotline.By closing the crab fishery two days a week after Sept. 14 and ending the season 45 days early (on Nov. 15), state officials hope to reduce the female crab harvest by 20 percent. Restrictions next year to end the season Oct. 31 and eliminate one day of crabbing a week should result in a 40 percent reduction in the annual female catch.
NEWS
July 28, 1995
Two months ago, crabs were selling for more than $100 a bushel and were relatively scarce even at that price. There was talk of further state restrictions on recreational and commercial crabbing to protect the Chesapeake's most valuable creature, even after the rules had been tightened last year. A gloomy report on declining numbers of blue crabs counted in the annual winter survey added to the pessimistic outlook.Now the succulent crustaceans are in ample supply and prices have dropped. The hungry side-walkers are fighting each other to grab on to chicken bait strung from trotlines or sitting in crab pots.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.