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NEWS
June 3, 2013
Abandoned crab pots can be a serious issue in the Chesapeake Bay. As long as there is bait in them they will continue to catch crabs. A dead crab in an abandoned pot becomes bait. But a recent article in The Sun refers to crab pots and crab traps interchangeably, and they are not the same thing ("Building a better crab trap," May 30). Traps are used primarily by recreational crabbers. It is a square trap made of wire such as chicken wire with bait such as salted eel tied inside. When it lands on the bottom the four sides are open.
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NEWS
June 3, 2013
Abandoned crab pots can be a serious issue in the Chesapeake Bay. As long as there is bait in them they will continue to catch crabs. A dead crab in an abandoned pot becomes bait. But a recent article in The Sun refers to crab pots and crab traps interchangeably, and they are not the same thing ("Building a better crab trap," May 30). Traps are used primarily by recreational crabbers. It is a square trap made of wire such as chicken wire with bait such as salted eel tied inside. When it lands on the bottom the four sides are open.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus | The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
Those trying to celebrate what is traditionally considered an annual rite of summer - catching crabs to feast on - are reminded that those tasty critters typically can be found in the same waters as the state's reptile, the diamondback terrapin. That's why officials from the Department of Natural Resources and the National Aquarium are asking recreation crab pot owners to include turtle excluders in their pots. Without the excluders, the equipment can accidentally trap and drown the diamondbacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
April 1 is the official start to the blue crab harvest in Maryland. But don't reach for your mallet just yet. "It's not time for crabs," said Jessica Borowski, a manager at Midtown BBQ and Brew. "It's too cold out. " The crabs seem to agree. The Chesapeake Bay's water temperature hasn't risen enough for the crabs to become active - and catchable. Consumers set on Maryland crabs will see limited availability for now - and prices to match. Prices for Chesapeake Bay crabs are typically high at the start of the season, and people who want them in April will have to pay even more than usual.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2012
This year, the Crab Pot hockey tournament is truly a Chesapeake Bay affair — all four teams are from Maryland. The men's collegiate tournament — in its 35th year — is hosted by the U.S. Naval Academy and was intended to be a face-off among state teams, but has frequently been won over the years by schools from Michigan, Pennsylvania and Virginia. Only in the past few seasons has the two-day event become Maryland-focused, bringing a new level of pride to the winners of the trophy, an enameled crab pot mounted on a tiered base.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,Staff Writer | February 1, 1993
After a furious second period that featured five goals -- three in 1 minute, 16 seconds -- Eastern Michigan University's defense tightened up in the third period and held on to beat Navy, 5-4, in the championship game of the 16th annual Crab Pot Ice Hockey Club Tournament at Dahlgren Hall in Annapolis.Making its first appearance at the Naval Academy, the Eagles (15-10) got a goal from junior forward Scott Ruffing with 14:29 left in the game and it held up.Navy coach Jim Barry, whose Mids (9-4-2)
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1997
It's not the Beanpot, but in Annapolis at the Naval Academy, the Crab Pot means as much to hockey fans as the Beanpot does in Boston. This year is significant -- the 20th Crab Pot Ice Hockey Tournament in 27 years of the club sport at the academy.On Saturday, in Navy's picturesque Dahlgren Hall, Buffalo and Drexel start things off at 1 p.m., followed by two-time defending champion Navy and Marquette at 4 p.m. The winners advance to Sunday's 3 p.m. championship game with the black, 25-gallon crab pot at stake.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,Sun Staff Writer | February 7, 1994
Powerful Eastern Michigan University repeated as champion of Navy's 17th annual Crab Pot Ice Hockey Tournament in Annapolis yesterday, skating to an 8-4 victory over Towson State University.Host Navy was shut out in the two-day event, losing its opener and yesterday's consolation.Ranked No. 5 this week by the American Collegiate Hockey Association, Eastern Michigan was appearing for the second time in as many years under coach Mike Donnelly.For years, Donnelly had harbored thoughts of visiting the Academy in Annapolis and he takes pleasant memories home.
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,Staff writer | February 4, 1991
Navy's 10th-ranked Club Ice Hockey team (10-3-1) won the 14th annualCrab Pot Tournament yesterday, defeating 9th-ranked West Chester College (Pa.), 5-3.Navy's win virtually assures the team's first-ever trip to the national Club Hockey Championships, to be played this year in Tempe, Ariz.Set for Feb. 27-March 2, the nationals will feature the top eightteams as ranked by Club Sports magazine.Coach Jim Barry's Mids had split a pair of games with West Chester (15-4) this season, each winning at home.
SPORTS
By PAT O'MALLEY | February 4, 1994
A lot of high school and college basketball is on tap again this weekend, but for those of you looking for other types of sports entertainment, the U.S. Naval Academy and the Severna Park YMCA are the places to be tomorrow and Sunday.The 17th annual Crab Pot Ice Hockey Tournament is set for tomorrow and Sunday at Navy's Dahlgren Hall, and the second annual Parents for Swimming in Anne Arundel County High School Championships begin 3 p.m. Sunday at the Severna Park YMCA pool.And guess what?
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 23, 2012
I have lived in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed for more than 30 years, and I have cracked dozens of crabs in the summertime, but I am embarrassed to say that until recently, I had never been crabbing. I don't mean tying a chicken neck to a piece of string and hanging it off the side of a dock while sitting next to a cooler of beer and a boom box. I mean real crabbing, like a real waterman. Over the years, almost all the crabs I have eaten have been from a pile in the middle of my friend Betsy's dining room table, straight from the crab pot in her back yard, the rewards of regular Sunday morning crabbing trips.
NEWS
By Joseph Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
A kayaker fell out of his craft into the Chesapeake Bay on Saturday night but reached shore safely, Maryland Natural Resources Police reported Sunday. Sgt. Art Windemuth, NRP public information officer, said Christopher Drott, 52, of Edgewater, was able to grab onto a paddle and a cooler to keep himself afloat after he fell out of the boat at about 7 p.m. Saturday. NRP issued a release Saturday requesting the public's help in locating the kayaker. The boat was found floating unattended near the mouth of the West River in Anne Arundel County, officials said, adding that a search was conducted using vessels and a helicopter.
SPORTS
By Don Markus | The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
Those trying to celebrate what is traditionally considered an annual rite of summer - catching crabs to feast on - are reminded that those tasty critters typically can be found in the same waters as the state's reptile, the diamondback terrapin. That's why officials from the Department of Natural Resources and the National Aquarium are asking recreation crab pot owners to include turtle excluders in their pots. Without the excluders, the equipment can accidentally trap and drown the diamondbacks.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2012
This year, the Crab Pot hockey tournament is truly a Chesapeake Bay affair — all four teams are from Maryland. The men's collegiate tournament — in its 35th year — is hosted by the U.S. Naval Academy and was intended to be a face-off among state teams, but has frequently been won over the years by schools from Michigan, Pennsylvania and Virginia. Only in the past few seasons has the two-day event become Maryland-focused, bringing a new level of pride to the winners of the trophy, an enameled crab pot mounted on a tiered base.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | March 6, 2010
On a day when he could have been out oystering, waterman Mike Edwards trolled the Chesapeake Bay south of Annapolis on Friday for a different quarry. Sitting at the wheel of his workboat, the Miss Renee Two, he felt a "nudge" on the line he was towing astern and winched it in to discover he'd hooked a mucky but otherwise intact crab pot. A lone oyster toadfish lay trapped inside. "I got one this time," said Edwards - meaning the pot, rather than the fish. Edwards, 53, of Grasonville is part of a small navy of watermen who have been hired by the state Department of Natural Resources this winter to pull derelict crab pots from the water.
NEWS
September 11, 2008
Tolls help recoup the cost of driving Before citizens get up in arms over the potential $200 per week cost of new high-occupancy toll lanes (HOT), it's important to remember that driving is not a cost-less transaction ("Driven away?" Sept. 7). From wear and tear on the roads and damage to the environment to added sprawl and added consumption of finite resources, the cost to the world of highway driving is much greater than the cost of a gallon of gas. HOT lanes help people to understand the true cost of driving.
SPORTS
By PAT O'MALLEY | January 29, 1993
It won't be quite the show they're having Sunday in Pasadena, Calif., but to local ice hockey fans, the Crab Pot Championship is just as super.The Buffalo Bills and Dallas Cowboys will be kicking off Super Bowl XXVII right around the time (6:18 p.m.) Navy's ice hockey club team hopes to be celebrating the championship of the 16th annual Crab Pot Tournament at Dahlgren Hall.Last February, fifth-year coach Jim Barry and his Mids attempted to repeat as Crab Pot champs for the first time since 1980-81 and take their sixth Pot overall since the inception of the tournament in 1978.
NEWS
By PAT O'MALLEY | February 1, 1991
It's been seven long years since freshman goalie Steve Bowen turned back 35 enemy shots by Penn State and took MVP honors as Navy's club ice hockey team won its own sixth annual Crab Pot Tournament by 6-2 over the Nittany Lions.That was an especially sweet victory because it avenged an embarrassing 11-2 loss to Penn State the year beforein the Crab Pot final. It was also the last time Navy's ice hockey team won its own tourney.Those were the days of the most successful Navy coach in the 21-year history of the club ice hockey program, Steve Gordon (93-29-6, 1975-1983)
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | September 16, 2007
As a veteran diver and recreational fisherman, Skip Zinck is used to dodging junk that dots the surface of the Chesapeake Bay and the mouths of its rivers. But there's one kind of debris lurking below the surface that really spooks him: ghost pots. Tens of thousands of derelict crab pots - enough to fill every bleacher seat at Camden Yards for 23 games - litter the shallows of the main stem of the bay. The traps, usually set adrift by storms, are potential deathtraps for fish, terrapins and crabs - and a threat to the bay's fragile ecology.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | May 1, 2006
Although Maryland sailors won 11 of the 18 classes of competition at the Lands' End National Offshore One Design regatta, they were quick to dismiss any thoughts that local knowledge gave them a leg up. The great equalizers, they said, were stiff current ripping through the four race courses just south of the Bay Bridge, lumpy seas and winds about eight knots with puffs in excess of 10 knots. "Being local wasn't an advantage," said Annapolitan Peter McChesney, who slipped from second to third on the last of three days of sailing and could not repeat as J/22 winner.
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